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The Heaviest and Largest Elephant Tusks

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#31

Beautiful specimens, hopefully those poachers could stay away from them and leave them alone.
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#32

Photo and information credits: Nimit Virdi's Photography
"Tusker's Habitat || April 2016" Nagarhole National Park, India

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#33

Photo and information credits: Alex Kirichko
The Big Boy.
Male Asian Elephant.
India, Nagarhole Tiger Reserve. July 2016.

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#34

Photo and information credits: Piper Mackay
"Hopefully in a few days, we will have the opportunity to see Tim again, the biggest tusker in Kenya. There was a time when numerous elephants with big tusk freely roamed across the African continent, but sadly, many of the biggest tuskers have been poached. There is a new trend in which many elephants are now being born without tusk. The elephants are so smart and are adapting to survive in their tragic environment. I am so glad I chose not to put off all the travel I have done throughout Africa. Sadly I have experienced so much more than my niece and nephew will ever get to experience on this magical continent, however with the constant fight to save them and their own ability to adapt, there is great hope the elephants will not become instinct. However, if you want to see large herds of these amazing animals, then move Africa to the very top of your bucket list!!! Have an extraordinary 2017!"

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United States Pckts Offline
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#35

Sharath Venky

It Isn't Mammoth

It's Mr Bhogeshwara

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-Oscar Wilde
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#36
( This post was last modified: 03-29-2017, 11:46 PM by GrizzlyClaws )

Impressive bull, he does look like a mini Palaeoloxodon.



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India Rishi Offline
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#37
( This post was last modified: 08-18-2017, 10:01 PM by Rishi )

A dozen tuskers...Starting with the oldest.

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Tusker & truck...for guesstimation of size.

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This is a famous one from Kabini.
Said to be 12-13 feet high...Note how puny mugger crocodile at his feet looks like despite​ being much closer to the camera!!!

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"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#38

@Rishi 


About #280: Really beautiful specimens ! I would have never believed that some extant asiatic elephants could be such "big tuskers". Which proves that it's possible if they can be left quietly throughout their lives.

I also notice, compared to the african elephants, their spinal column plunging from the pelvis, particularly at the first and fourth photo. Their morphology is more curved.
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India Rishi Offline
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#39
( This post was last modified: 08-18-2017, 09:40 PM by Rishi )

(08-18-2017, 06:50 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Rishi 


About #280: Really beautiful specimens ! I would have never believed that some extant asiatic elephants could be such "big tuskers". Which proves that it's possible if they can be left quietly throughout their lives.

Truely... Unlike African ones who have it hollow, Asian elephants have solid tusks that need many years to grow. 

Indian & Sri Lankan elephants see a lot of conflict with people, especially along the migratory routes, which are fragmented. The prospect of an easy meal get them to raiding crops, which is much more nutritious than leaves & bark & roots.

But, usually the killer isn't direct conflict...It IS, sometimes (Marauding elephant that killed 15 might be shot as last resort) But mostly there's some chasing each other, cracker bursting, stuff crushng..but the primary reasons of premature deaths are ELECTROCUTION (visit for stats) from sagging electricity lines, or electrified farm fencing by connecting it illegally to live wires...
Quote:WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT


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..& RAILWAYS (visit for stats). Collisions have reduced after proper identification of migration corridors, but electrocution from Railway power lines are rampant as India is trying to phase out polluting diesel engines...

Quote:WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT


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Actually, the best specimens are the Forest Department employees (they get food & care as salary, retire at 60, & draw pension). They live a safer life, are allowed to roam into forests & mate.

In Mudumalai Tiger Reserve of Tamil nadu, there's this big guy called Santosh, who's 11 feet tall & 50 years old. His tusks are 5½ feet in length & got worned away at the lower ends!!!..

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"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#40

@Rishi :

About #282: Thank you for answering and sharing the linky about the stats concerning animal deaths by railways and electrocution. I appreciate the tone of the articles and the importance they give to protect the wildlife, particularly the iconic species (elephants, tigers, leopards, lions...).

But I would believe the Republic of India is becoming a small country (3.287.000 square kilometers according to Wikipedia) regarding its population (1,252 billion inhabitants always according to Wikipedia) i.e. 381 inhabitants per square kilometer. It's a lot ! Under these conditions, protecting some animals like tigers, elephants, lions, sloth bears, indian rhinos, leopards and so on that need some big wild spaces, is a permanent challenge.
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#41
( This post was last modified: 11-19-2017, 05:04 AM by epaiva )

Incredible Bull Elephants with huge tusks

Taken from the Book Great Tuskers of Africa (Johan Marais and David Hadaway)


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#42
( This post was last modified: 11-19-2017, 05:00 AM by epaiva )

World Record Elephant Tusks
5 Bigger Elephant Tusks on Record
Taken from the Book Great Tuskers of Africa (Johan Marais and David Hadaway)
Picture of Letaba Elephant Hall located in Kruger National Park


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-19-2017, 05:32 AM by epaiva )


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Taken from the Book Great Tuskers of Africa (Johan Marais and David Hadaway)
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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Canada Wolverine Offline
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#45

(11-19-2017, 03:17 AM)epaiva Wrote: Incredible Bull Elephants with huge tusks

Taken from the Book Great Tuskers of Africa (Johan Marais and David Hadaway)


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The REAL King of the beasts - African bush elephant!!
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