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The Heaviest and Largest Elephant Tusks

United States Pckts Offline
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#16

I do know that when I compare Asian to African Elephants, the Asians be more "legs" while the Africans have more Body mass. But Im not sure how their weight compares at parity.
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#17
( This post was last modified: 03-12-2015, 06:54 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

(03-12-2015, 02:10 AM)'tigerluver' Wrote: I can't say either way if 18th century records are completely reliable. At the same time, I don't want to throw out data. 

Does anyone know reliable dimensional measurements of the elephants? Off height only on Wikipedia, the Asian elephant seems more dense kg/cm^3 wise, opposite to the tusk comparison. 

 

The Asian elephant got a denser body proportion, but in term of the density about the tusk, the African elephant definitely got an edge here.

The same analogy can be applied for the lightly built Amur tiger who got the heaviest canine tooth of all big cats.
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#18

(03-12-2015, 03:26 AM)'Pckts' Wrote: I do know that when I compare Asian to African Elephants, the Asians be more "legs" while the Africans have more Body mass. But Im not sure how their weight compares at parity.

 

It is the African elephant who is more leggy, while the Asian elephant is bulkier in proportion.

I think we can have a weight chart for both species, and maybe Guate or tigerluver could do a favor here for us.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#19

Here is what I mean by "Leggy"

Asian Elephant (Notice the length of his front limbs compared to his body)

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and here through the Tall grass

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and this guy

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Compared to Africans

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Now when I look at both, Africans have very long legs as well. You know what I notice about the Asian Elephants, they seem to be almost "lifted" in front end. Like their front limbs are quite taller than their back limbs. Image a car who is lifted in the front only. Kind of like that, if it makes sense to you?

 
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#20

The attached sources states the longest tusk ever found are of Mammut borsoni, at 4.58 m and 5.02 m, measured over the outer curvature. 
 

Attached Files
. lo   18. Tsoukala, E. & Mol, D. (W. van Logchem) 2010 - Poster - The Milia Mammut borsoni (Grevena, Macedonia, Greece) ... lo (Size: 1.69 MB / Downloads: 13)
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#21

@tigerluver

Yes beautiful tusks... During Pleistocene the Earth really belonged to big mammals.
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#22

(03-22-2015, 06:21 PM)'Spalea' Wrote: @tigerluver

Yes beautiful tusks... During Pleistocene the Earth really belonged to big mammals.


 

Yep, everything was bigger back then, so it was not surprising at all.
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Canada Shardul Offline
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#23
( This post was last modified: 09-03-2015, 06:39 AM by Shardul )





A great video of the Duar Elephant. The elephants from the Duars and Terai seem to have a larger forehead and a more pronounced twin domed head than Southern Indian elephants.
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Canada Shardul Offline
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#24





One More
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United Kingdom Sully Online
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#25

I went to the museum the other day (natural history museum) and they claimed they had the record tusks. They were about 12 ft (from my observation) and 95kg each (confirmed)
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Malaysia JawaRumbia Offline
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#26


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"The tale as Bell tells it:


On our arrival at Mani-Mani we were met by one Shundi--a remarkable man. Karirono by birth he had been captured early in life, taken to the coast and sold as a slave. Being a man of great force of character he had soon freed himself by turning Mohammedan. Thence onward fortune had smiled upon him until at last he was, the recognised Tajir (rich man) of all the traders. Having naturally the intelligence to recognise the value of bluff and from his primitive ancestors the nerve to carry it off, he was at this time the greatest of all traders. Just as he had been a leader while slave-raiding was the order of the day, so now he led when ivory had given place to slaves as a commodity. One other thing that makes him conspicuous, at any rate, in my mind, and that he had owned the slave who who had laid low the elephant which bore the enormous tusks, one of which now reposes in the south Kensington museum. these tusks are still, as far as I know, the record. The one we have in London scales 234lb. or thereabouts. According to Shuundi his slave killed it with a muzzle-loader on the slopes of Kilimandjaro."


Any further info of the gargantuan Kilimanjaro tusk or where it been kept?
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United Kingdom Sully Online
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#27

(11-08-2015, 06:41 AM)JawaRumbia Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author





*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author


"The tale as Bell tells it:


On our arrival at Mani-Mani we were met by one Shundi--a remarkable man. Karirono by birth he had been captured early in life, taken to the coast and sold as a slave. Being a man of great force of character he had soon freed himself by turning Mohammedan. Thence onward fortune had smiled upon him until at last he was, the recognised Tajir (rich man) of all the traders. Having naturally the intelligence to recognise the value of bluff and from his primitive ancestors the nerve to carry it off, he was at this time the greatest of all traders. Just as he had been a leader while slave-raiding was the order of the day, so now he led when ivory had given place to slaves as a commodity. One other thing that makes him conspicuous, at any rate, in my mind, and that he had owned the slave who who had laid low the elephant which bore the enormous tusks, one of which now reposes in the south Kensington museum. these tusks are still, as far as I know, the record. The one we have in London scales 234lb. or thereabouts. According to Shuundi his slave killed it with a muzzle-loader on the slopes of Kilimandjaro."


Any further info of the gargantuan Kilimanjaro tusk or where it been kept?


those first ones are the ones i was talking about
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Malaysia JawaRumbia Offline
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#28

@SVTIGRIS oh.. So the first pic of the elephant tusk is in Natural History Museum.. Also from your observation, do you think the tusk from first pic is the same size as the tusk in the third pic?
I think they are the same tusk..
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United Kingdom Sully Online
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#29

(11-08-2015, 07:06 AM)JawaRumbia Wrote: @SVTIGRIS oh.. So the first pic of the elephant tusk is in Natural History Museum.. Also from your observation, do you think the tusk from first pic is the same size as the tusk in the third pic?
I think they are the same tusk..


yea the natural history museum

and i think the first tusk is bigger, it was about double the size of everyone in the museum, but the second one isn't...just imo
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#30
( This post was last modified: 03-08-2016, 02:00 AM by Ngala )

All photo and information credits: Richard Moller of the Tsavo Trust

Tsavo East National Park, Kenya

“When I used to spend time with Satao, he never ceased to amaze me for he must have endured so much over his long life span of approximately 50 years. From witnessing the poaching holocaust of the 1970’s and 80’s (where many of his friends and relatives would have lost their lives for their teeth), to the many droughts over the years and even poaching attempts on his life. The fact that an elephant with such magnificent ivory and stature even existed until this time last year staggers me….” 

Satao
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*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


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*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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