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The California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)

Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-03-2018, 11:07 PM by epaiva )

Accounts from the mid-19th century indicate that this speciews was scarce even then. Throughout most of the 20th century the California Condor was harrased, shot and even poisoned, and by the 1970s scarcely 30 birds survived. During the 1980s researchers captured the few remaining wild birds and began captive breeding programs. These have been succesful, but it remains not to be seen if reintroduction into natural habitats will ultimately suceed.
45-55" (114-140 cm) A massive black bird with wingspan up to 9 feet (275 cm). Adults show large areas of white feathers on the forward part of the wing. They have reddish-orange, featherless heads and black ruffs or neck collars. They weight from 7 to 14 kg (15 to 31lb), their normal average weight goes from 8 to 9 kg (18 to 20 lb).
Habitat: Mountainsides and open brush country, Nests in cliffside ledges.
National Audubon Society - North American Birds of Prey.
Range: Historically from the Columbia River in Oregon south throught Lower california. During the 20th century, restricted to southern California.

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-03-2018, 11:22 PM by epaiva )

Credit to @forestadjacent

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*This image is copyright of its original author

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( This post was last modified: 09-16-2018, 02:15 AM by epaiva )

Credits to @abc7la and @poodlesandpixiedust

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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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Endangered California condors seen in Sequoia National Park after nearly 50 years

Endangered California condors have been spotted in Sequoia National Park for the first time in nearly 50 years as the giant birds reclaim historic habitat lost when the species teetered on the brink of extinction.

Condors were observed atop the towering granite dome of Moro Rock in late May, the National Park Service said Tuesday.

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Condors fitted with GPS transmitters were also tracked flying around Giant Forest, according to Dave Meyer, a California condor biologist with the Santa Barbara Zoo. 
The birds are scavengers and they almost died out in large part due to ingesting lead in the carcasses of animals shot by hunters.

"Condors were consistently seen throughout the parks until the late 1970s. Observations became increasingly rare throughout the latter portion of the century as the population declined," said Tyler Coleman, a wildlife biologist with Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

In the early 1980s, all 22 birds remaining in the wild were trapped and brought into a captive-breeding program that began releasing condors into Southern California's Los Padres National Forest in 1992. 


That flock has been expanding its range while other condors now occupy parts of California's Central Coast, Arizona, Utah and Baja California. The total wild population now numbers about 340 birds. 
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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