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Stray & Feral animals

United States Pckts Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 12-21-2018, 12:07 PM by Rishi )

Credit to Vickey Chauhan

The Bloodbath
Dogs attacking a bluebull
Gandhinagar | Nov 11


*This image is copyright of its original author


" stray dogs kill many wild animals in Mudumalai... how to check the dogs is a moot question...they kill all the babies & young ones of animals as spotted deer, sambar , mouse deer etc...a grave threat to wildlife..."
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#2

This is terrible! Feral dogs are a big menace for wildlife. I could sound harsh, but those dogs most be destroyed immediately, for the sake of the ecosystem health.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#3
( This post was last modified: 11-05-2015, 12:45 AM by Pckts )

Unfortunately its not the dogs fault this happened, its our own. But that being said, I wonder how their genes would effect the rest of the animals. Maybe dhole and these dogs breed and create a dhole like dog that contribute to dholes decreasing numbers?
But who knows, hunting these dogs may allow hunting of other species by "not so trustworthy individuals" I:E: Tigers so its a tough situation for sure.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#4

A mix between dholes and feral dogs will directly affect dholes genetic and could leave to its extinction.

Yes, to kill "all" those dogs could be practically impossible, especially with the resilience of those canids. A similar case happened in the Holocene in Australia, the feral dogs became in dingoes and the native fauna suffered losses.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#5

(11-05-2015, 12:51 AM)GuateGojira Wrote: A mix between dholes and feral dogs will directly affect dholes genetic and could leave to its extinction.

Yes, to kill "all" those dogs could be practically impossible, especially with the resilience of those canids. A similar case happened in the Holocene in Australia, the feral dogs became in dingoes and the native fauna suffered losses.

The dingo have no natural predators, so they obviously impacted kangaroo and emu and other natural fauna quite a bit. But who knows, maybe these dogs will become a nice supplemental prey item for tigers and leopards. I wonder how they interact with Dhole as it is? Its a new problem that I have observed, but its obviously been going on for years.
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#6

The dog and dhole don't belong to the same species or even the same genus, so I don't think they gonna breed in the wild.

BTW, the tiger and leopard are notoriously known as the "dog killers", so they might be effective to control the population of the feral dogs that return to the wild.

As long as the tiger and leopard have a sufficient number, then this new structure for the ecosystem might work.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#7

I know dholes are canids though, shouldn't they be able to bread with other canids?
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#8
( This post was last modified: 11-05-2015, 01:23 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

They are too distantly related in the family of the canidae.

A feral dog could breed with the wolf in the wild, or maybe even with the coyote, but not with the dhole who belongs to a different genus of the family canidae.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#9

Really? I had no idea, I would think it would be same same as in big cats.
Thanks for the info, I wonder how they will coexist with Dhole then. Much like Jackal and Wolf I am sure, but they are probably a little behind the evolutionary curve so It would probably take some time to work things out.
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#10

The dog/wolf/coyote are Canis, while the dhole is Cuon.

So they are not the same.
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United Kingdom Sully Online
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#11

I agree with Guate, the Eco-system could take a grave hit.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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#12

more than 10 dogs corner a bluebull




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Bluebull chased by dogs and Indian wild asses watching

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Mother and fawn of Indian wild ass being attacked, Rann of kutch, India

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Dogs trying to take on Kiang- Tibetan wild ass, Ladakh, India

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chasing a blackbuck

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Dog predates a blackbuck fawn

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Feral dog chasing a fox

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In Africa, like nilgai in India, feral dogs chasing a wildebeest

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Feral dogs cornering a brown bear in China

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Rage2277 Offline
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#13


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 Deer Fighting for Life and Domestic Dog Fighting for Food... It's a Nutures Circle no one can Relief . 

@Jonona Lake , Chandrapur 2018 Rahul Kuchankar
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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Rage2277 Offline
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#14
( This post was last modified: 10-01-2018, 04:08 PM by Rage2277 )


*This image is copyright of its original author
 Ambar Chakraborty - It was in a group of 7-8 golden jackal. Is it a crossbreed of dog and jackal ?
Expert opinion is needed.
|
●Uluberia outskirts,Howrah,Bangla●
September-2018.
.Youtube Link for Better understanding. 



"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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India Sanju Offline
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#15
( This post was last modified: 02-10-2019, 10:16 AM by Sanju )

Pablo Escobar's hippos keep multiplying and Colombia doesn’t know how to stop it
CBS News February 9, 2019, 12:39 PM

Fishing villages, small boats and children at play dot the landscape along the shallow waterways of Colombia's Magdalena River. But an invasive species left behind by one of the country's most infamous figures is threatening the ecosystem and, possibly, a way of life.
That species? Hippos. The giants, native only to Africa, are now running wild in Colombia, reports CBS News' Manuel Bojorquez.

The story of Colombia's hippos starts in Villa Napoles, the former estate of Pablo Escobar, who in his heyday had four hippos smuggled there for his private zoo.
Escobar's ranch housed hundreds of exotic animals including rhinos, elephants and giraffes. By the 1980s, his cocaine empire made him the wealthiest and most feared drug lord in the world. For Colombia, it was a reign of terror. He's said to be responsible for some 7,000 deaths.
Around the time Escobar met his death in the early 90s, the government relocated most of the animals but not the hippos who were basically allowed to roam free.
"People forgot the hippos," said biologist David Echeverri, who works with CORNARE, the environmental agency in charge of tracking and managing the hippos in the region. He estimates there are about 50 or more of them now.

The area where they roam is a paradise for the animals who have no predators and ample food and water. But they're getting too close to people. It's not uncommon to spot a three-ton hippo walking around town. Locals call them the "village pets," but Echeverri said the "dangerous" and "territorial" species is anything but. 
In Africa, hippos cause more human deaths than any other large animal. So far, there are no known attacks in Colombia.
The majority of the hippos still live inside Escobar's former estate, which was turned into a theme park in 2007, but the issue is that they can't keep them contained. Some have been able to get out which is how they are turning up in other areas.

Oberdan Martinez runs a theme park there, where the hippos are a main attraction. According to Martinez, Colombia's the only place you'll see a pack of hippos in the wild outside of Africa. He also said it's more common to see a hippo in that area than a pig.
There's concern the hippos have already started to displace native wildlife, like the manatee, and keep getting too close for comfort.
In the past year, fisherman Pablo Jose Mejia has come across five hippos that ventured outside of the theme park. But he said they're like dogs – if you know how to deal with them, you'll be fine.

But Echeverri fears, with an ever-growing hippo population, it's only a matter of time until someone gets hurt and killing the animals has proven highly unpopular.
"We can't just kill the hippos and the other solution is relocating hippos, sterilizing hippos," Echeverri said, although he acknowledged that would be an expensive and dangerous process.
 
With limited funds, it's a solution unlikely to stem the tide on a legacy that just keeps resurfacing.     
© 2019 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/pablo-escob...o-stop-it/

Invasive Potential


In the late 1980s, Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar kept four hippos in a private menagerie at his residence in Hacienda Nápoles, 100 kilometres (62 mi) east of Medellín, Colombia, after buying them in New Orleans. They were deemed too difficult to seize and move after Escobar's death, and hence left on the untended estate. By 2007, the animals had multiplied to 16 and had taken to roaming the area for food in the nearby Magdalena River.

In 2009, two adults and one calf escaped the herd and, after attacking humans and killing cattle, one of the adults (called "Pepe") was killed by hunters under authorization of the local authorities. As of early 2014, 40 hippos have been reported to exist in Puerto Triunfo, Antioquia from the original four belonging to Escobar.

As of 2018 the growing population was estimated at 50-70. Without management the population size is likely to more than double in next decade. The National Geographic Channel produced a documentary about them titled Cocaine Hippos. A report published in a Yale student magazine noted that local environmentalists are campaigning to protect the animals, although there is no clear plan for what will happen to them.

In 2018, National Geographic published an article on the hippos, citing disagreement among environmentalists on whether they were having a positive or negative impact, but that conservationists and locals - particularly those in the tourism industry - were mostly in support of their continued presence.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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