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Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia)

Italy Ngala Offline
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#46
( This post was last modified: 09-19-2017, 10:32 PM by Ngala )

Photo and information credits: Sebastian Kennerknecht Photography
Sarychat-Ertash Nature Reserve, where Panthera's snow leopard team is doing their research, was established in 1995. Due to the active patrolling by anti-poaching rangers, the Reserve boasts a healthy population of snow leopards. A genetic study conducted in 2009 in the Reserve showed a minimum of 18 snow leopards in a 1,341 km2 area (Jumabay et al., 2013), whereas results from systematic camera trapping conducted by SLT/SLF in 2014 revealed a minimum of 15 snow leopards in the same area,

This is an old bruiser, a male probably around 7-8 years old. You can see that it is a male from all his scars on his face, results of him fighting with other males over territory (females are too classy for such things). This was taken via a camera trap, which was set-up on a ridge that this male liked to frequent.

This was taken on assignment for Panthera, photographing their Snow Leopard project in Kyrgyzstan, led by principal investigator Shannon Kachel. Shannon's work in the Tian Shan Mountains is the first telemetry research on Snow Leopards in Kyrgyzstan, giving him insight into snow leopard ecology and their role in the ecosystem. If you want to support his work and Panthera's in general, please check out their page and give them a like (and donate if you can)!
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Snow Leopards are currently classified as endangered. Their global wild population is estimated to be between 4,500 and 10,000 (though new methods are determining that their numbers are probably higher). The important thing to note is that their population is decreasing.

Their main threat is the illegal wildlife trade, for which they are captured and killed. Their magnificent fur is used for coats and hats. Their bones are used as a substitute to tiger bones in traditional Asian medicine, believed to cure joint and back pain. Cubs are captured illegally and are sold to public and private zoos.

Panthera's conservation activities include conducting surveys, assessing threats, securing habitat, mitigating human-wildlife conflict by collaborating with local communities, and helping governments establish and implement National Snow Leopard Action Plans. They are fighting for the survival of snow leopards. If you have a chance, check out the Panthera page and donate if you can.

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#47

Photo and information credits: Vinod Bartakke
Snow Leopard! 
Kibber WLS, Himachal Pradesh 
March 2017

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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India parvez Offline
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#48







Wisdom of third eye
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#49

Abundance, Distribution and Conservation of Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) in Humla District, Nepal Lama, 2015
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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India parvez Offline
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#50

Their distribution,

*This image is copyright of its original author
Wisdom of third eye
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Russian Federation AlexE Offline
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#51




Wolf and snow leopard
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United States Roflcopters Offline
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#52
( This post was last modified: 02-06-2018, 08:30 PM by Roflcopters )

what a beautiful animal! 





Jan/2018 sighting from Urumqwi, North West China.





watch from 00:20 - 1:18, incredible sighting..
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Russian Federation AlexE Offline
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#53

This is perhaps the FIRST ever Ultra High Definition 4K sequence of a Snow Leopard attacking and killing its prey - a Bharal or wild Himalayan Blue Sheep. The Snow Leopard unwittingly leaps off a 400 foot high cliff, locked in a death embrace with the sheep. The two tumble down a 85 degree slope, falling onto rocks with deadly ferocity. The Snow Leopard ultimately wins and stays on to enjoy its quarry over the next few days.





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India sanjay Offline
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#54

@AlexE This is amazing, What a superhero he is ? Superman ??? WOW.....  shocked Confused
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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#55

@AlexE  [Image: mygod.png] Man! i thought jaguar hauling a caiman was incredible, and now this. Snow leopard is becoming my personal favorite. just to think that they live in such hostile environment and hunt wild sheep and goats, these things must be happening for most part of it's life. Snow leopard chase is the ultimate i feel they live in such uncompromising terrain and goes for the mad rush it cannot change its momentum whatever happens, happens. Tfs, and btw these are Himalyan ibex - bigger species than Blue sheep.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#56

@AlexE :

About #53: The snow leopard are hunting on vertical grounds as the other felids are doing on level grounds... So what ? No seriously I'm quite astounded...

I don't know if we early selected this one:




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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#57

(03-30-2018, 07:00 AM)AlexE Wrote: This is perhaps the FIRST ever Ultra High Definition 4K sequence of a Snow Leopard attacking and killing its prey - a Bharal or wild Himalayan Blue Sheep. The Snow Leopard unwittingly leaps off a 400 foot high cliff, locked in a death embrace with the sheep. The two tumble down a 85 degree slope, falling onto rocks with deadly ferocity. The Snow Leopard ultimately wins and stays on to enjoy its quarry over the next few days.





@AlexE
Thanks a lot for sharing it, incredible videos incredible Snow Leopards
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Russian Federation AlexE Offline
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#58

description of the video:
Snow leopard killed yak at Rumbak




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India Rishi Offline
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#59
( This post was last modified: 04-09-2018, 05:27 AM by Rishi )

(03-30-2018, 10:59 PM)AlexE Wrote: description of the video:
Snow leopard killed yak at Rumbak





Wow, how on earth did he kill that?

Those things easily weigh 500kgs & are covered with like, 6inches of fur...
I totally used to underestimate the snow-leopards!
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Russian Federation AlexE Offline
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#60

Snow leopard and wolves


*This image is copyright of its original author
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