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Small Wild Cats

India brotherbear Offline
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#31

(08-31-2014, 07:15 PM)Siegfried Wrote: Caracal and bobcat housed together.

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/wi...e-caracal/
 

Interesting to see these two getting along so well together.
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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India brotherbear Offline
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#32

Northwest Florida Daily News - Wednesday, June 1, 2016.
Bobcat suspected in attack on woman. Authorities believe a woman might have been attacked by an adult bobcat Tuesday morning on the Eglin reservation in Walton County.
The woman was taken to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Emerald Coast after the attack, which was called in shortly after 8 am.
"The best guess is that it could have been an adult male bobcat," said Mike Spaits, a spokesman for Eglin Air Force Base. "But we're not completely sure because the information was sketchy." 
He said there are bobcats on the reservation, but they don't know how many because officials don't track their population.
He called Tuesday's attack "a very unusual occurrence" and said he never had heard of a local bobcat attack.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is investigating the incident.
FWC spokeswoman Bekkah Nelson said they could not confirm the type of animal that attacked the woman, but that it wasn't a bear.
The victim had injuries to her head and stomach that were not life-threatening, Nelson said.
The attack occurred south of Freeport in a secure area of the reservation. The woman is a contractor for Eglin, Spaits said.
"She came out of one of the buildings and that's when it occurred," he said.
Walton County sheriff's deputies also responded to the incident, which was originally called in as a bear attack, according to spokeswoman Corey Dobridnia.
"The victim was in shock," she said. "She didn't know what had attacked her."
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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India brotherbear Offline
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#33

A follow-up of the story on post #9. The lady tells more about the incident. She had walked out onto her front porch to discover several tomcats there because her female was in heat. The biggest of them had a short tail and so she assumes it was a bobcat. When she tried to "shoo" it away, that is when it attacked her, clawing and biting. Yesterday, the "bobcat" returned and was again on her front porch. This time the lady goes back inside and returns with her .22 pistol and kills the strange cat. Then she wrapped it in a plastic bag and puts it in the trash. 
I did not hand-copy this as the news article is quite long. But, I have some serious doubts that the cat was indeed a bobcat.
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#34

Earliest “Domestic” Cats in China Identified as Leopard Cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) Vigne et al., 2016

*This image is copyright of its original author

Fig 1. Modern distribution of wild felid species, archaeological site location and mandible shape relationship between modern wild felid species and domestic cat.
(A), Modern Old World distribution of the different wild cat subspecies (Felis silvestris) and the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis), and location of the three Middle-Late Neolithic sites of the Shaanxi and Henan Provinces (China) analyzed in this paper: 1, Quanhucun, 2, Wuzhuangguoliang, 3, Xiawanggang (Redrawn from [http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=60354712] and [http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=18146] under a CC BY license, with permission from IUCN Red List of Threatened Species; S1 Text.; CAD I. Carrère); (B), Phenotypic relationship (unrooted neighbour joining tree) built on mandible shape distances between modern domestic cat (F. catus), leopard cat (P. bengalensis) and the two relevant sub-species of wild cat (F. s. silvestris; F. s. lybica) from our analyses.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Fig 2. Geometric morphometric analyses of the five archaeological Chinese cat mandibles.
Left column: lateral view of the mandibles—the first and the fourth specimens being transposed right side left, the scale bare represents 1cm. Middle column: Boxplot comparison of centroid size of the archaeological specimen (A), with those of modern: domestic cat (Dom), leopard cat (Pb), European wildcat (Fss) and SW Asian wildcat (Fsl). Right column: species identification of the specimen based on discriminant analyses computed on mandible shape variables. Percentages within brackets correspond to the probability of being identified as Pb.

Abstract:
"The ancestor of all modern domestic cats is the wildcat, Felis silvestris lybica, with archaeological evidence indicating it was domesticated as early as 10,000 years ago in South-West Asia. A recent study, however, claims that cat domestication also occurred in China some 5,000 years ago and involved the same wildcat ancestor (F. silvestris). The application of geometric morphometric analyses to ancient small felid bones from China dating between 5,500 to 4,900 BP, instead reveal these and other remains to be that of the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). These data clearly indicate that the origins of a human-cat ‘domestic’ relationship in Neolithic China began independently from South-West Asia and involved a different wild felid species altogether. The leopard cat’s ‘domestic’ status, however, appears to have been short-lived—its apparent subsequent replacement shown by the fact that today all domestic cats in China are genetically related to F. silvestris."

Other articles related:
Earliest Cat Domesticated in China Was the Leopard Cat, Scientists Say
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#35

Rediscovering the Arabian sand cat (Felis margarita harrisoni) after a gap of 10 years using camera traps in the Western Region of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Ahmed et al., 2016

*This image is copyright of its original author

Credits: Environment Agency - Abu Dhabi

Abstract:
"We provide confirmed sightings of the elusive Arabian sand cat (Felis margarita harrisoni) using trail camera traps in Baynouna Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. A total of 46 photographs were obtained using five camera traps, during 278 trap nights, between March and December 2015. A total of three individuals were recorded of which one was confirmed as a male. About 80 % of the sightings were between 00:00 and 06:00 h, and 39 % were recorded during the full moon phase. These are the first confirmed sightings of the presence of Arabian sand cat in the Western Region of Abu Dhabi Emirate after an unconfirmed sighting reported in 2005."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#36

Photo and information credits: Brendon Cremer Photography
"An African Wild Cat photographed on a recent photo tour to Namibia with @tuskphoto."

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#37

From Sabi Sabi Private Game Reserve:
"We were very privileged to have a sighting of a very relaxed African Wild Cat."

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#38

Two species of Southeast Asian cats in the genus Catopuma with diverging histories: an island endemic forest specialist and a widespread habitat generalist Patel et al., 2016

*This image is copyright of its original author

Figure 1.
Geographical distribution of samples from Asian golden cats and bay cats used in the analyses of molecular data and pelage colour data. Pie charts represent coat colour proportions found in the population of that geographical area. White numbers on pie charts denote sample size used in pelage colour data analysis for that population. Black dots indicate populations used for mitogenome analysis. Initials of populations (SIK: Sikkim, India, TIB: Tibet, SIC: Sichuan, YUN: Yunnan, CH: China, FU: Fukien, TH: Thailand, VI: Vietnam, MA: Malaysia, SU: Sumatra) are given together with sample size.

Abstract:
"Background. The bay cat Catopuma badia is endemic to Borneo, whereas its sister species the Asian golden cat Catopuma temminckii is distributed from the Himalayas and southern China through Indochina, Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra. Based on morphological data, up to five subspecies of the Asian golden cat have been recognized, but a taxonomic assessment, including molecular data and morphological characters, is still lacking. Results. We combined molecular data (whole mitochondrial genomes), morphological data (pelage) and species distribution projections (up to the Late Pleistocene) to infer how environmental changes may have influenced the distribution of these sister species over the past 120 000 years. The molecular analysis was based on sequenced mitogenomes of 3 bay cats and 40 Asian golden cats derived mainly from archival samples. Our molecular data suggested a time of split between the two species approximately 3.16 Ma and revealed very low nucleotide diversity within the Asian golden cat population, which supports recent expansion of the population. Discussion. The low nucleotide diversity suggested a population bottleneck in the Asian golden cat, possibly caused by the eruption of the Toba volcano in Northern Sumatra (approx. 74 kya), followed by a continuous population expansion in the Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene. Species distribution projections, the reconstruction of the demographic history, a genetic isolation-by-distance pattern and a gradual variation of pelage pattern support the hypothesis of a post-Toba population expansion of the Asian golden cat from south China/Indochina to Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra. Our findings reject the current classification of five subspecies for the Asian golden cat, but instead support either a monotypic species or one comprising two subspecies: (i) the Sunda golden cat, distributed south of the Isthmus of Kra: C. t. temminckii and (ii) Indochinese, Indian, Himalayan and Chinese golden cats, occurring north of the Isthmus: C. t. moormensis."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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India Vinay Offline
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#39
( This post was last modified: 11-19-2016, 07:07 PM by Vinay )

Small cats from different regions ..... Please add entire Asia and Europe cats ??

America's!! 


*This image is copyright of its original author


Africa - 10 cats


*This image is copyright of its original author


India is home to world's biggest cat-Bengal to Smallest cat -Rusty spotted.Total 15   Lol


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Italy Ngala Offline
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#40
( This post was last modified: 11-29-2016, 06:18 PM by Ngala Edit Reason: Add binomial name )

Caracal (Caracal caracal) from Masai Mara, Kenya. Credits to Sammy Kaleku.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#41
( This post was last modified: 11-29-2016, 06:18 PM by Ngala Edit Reason: Add binomial name )

Serval (Leptailurus serval) with her cubs from Masai Mara, Kenya.

Photo and information credits: Gkpixels
"Nature always gives you in abundance. Serval cat with her litter."

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#42
( This post was last modified: 12-09-2016, 03:08 PM by Ngala )

Pallas's Cat (Otocolobus manul) from Tibet mountains.

Photo and information credits: Vincent Munier - Photographer
Live from Tibet!
The rare and unknown Pallas’s cat (or manul): I spent a whole afternoon lying on the ground, covered in snow, very well hidden to take this shot.
We don’t know much about the biology of this cat, because it is so hard to find and observe, in very remote places…

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#43
( This post was last modified: 12-11-2016, 06:04 AM by peter )

NEW ANDEAN CAT POPULATION DISCOVERED

Apart from pumas, Patagonia has four other small cats:

- Geoffroy's cat (Leopardus geoffroyi);
- Pampas cat (Leopardus pajeros);
- Jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi), and
- Andean cat (Leopardus jacobita).

The Andean cat was thought to live high up in the Andes, but it was recently found at an altitude of 650 m. in Patagonia. This small cat heavily depends on the mountain vizcacha (Lagidium viscacia), which is related to the chinchilla.

I thought the jaguarundi was a typical jungle cat, but it's also seen in Patagonia:

http://www.zmescience.com/other/new-andean-cat-population-discovered-2955523/

http://wildcatsmagazine.nl/conservation/huellas-footprints-in-argentina/
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India brotherbear Offline
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#44

Great Soul of Siberia by Sooyong Park - 2015.
Along with the leopard and the tiger, the Siberian lynx is one of the three large cats of Northeast Asia. It's the smallest of the three, weighing a maximum of about thirty-kilograms, but also the fiercest. An Udege hunter named Tipui once saw a lynx kill a Manchurian red deer ten times its size. He told me the story.
One autumn, during the Manchurian red deer mating season, Tipui had been hiding near a deer trail when a medium-sized lynx came along. The lynx took a running start, sprung off the ground, and clung to the trunk of a Siberian dwarf pine with its sharp claws. It climbed the tree, scratching the bark with its claws on the way up, and hid itself among the trees branches that extended above the deer trail. After a long wait, a herd of Manchurian red deer, each about the size of a horse, came along. The lynx jumped down onto the back of a deer. The deer jerked about, trying to get the lynx off its back. But the lynx had a firm grip on its prey, using its sharp claws to dig into the flesh, and no amount of jerking or kicking made the slightest difference. The lynx rode the deer like a rodeo cowboy, and when the exhausted deer paused for a second, the lynx sunk its fangs into the deer's neck. It clung to the deer's throat for thirty minutes. 
In the end, the deer gave in, even though it was nearly ten times bigger than the lynx. When the deer hit the ground, the lynx clamped down on the throat and shook even harder to finish off the job. Only when the deer was completely still did the lynx let go and raise its head. The gray fur on its intense face was stained red. Tipui said the lynx must have been exhausted, too, because it took a long nap afterward, using the deer as a pillow.
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#45
( This post was last modified: 12-14-2016, 11:23 PM by Ngala )

Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) from Pantanal, Brazil.

Photo and information credits: Wim van den Heever Wildlife Photographer
Perfect Ocelot
Word came through from a few researchers that wild Ocelot were frequenting a small fishing village deep in the heart of the Pantanal. 
I stuck it out night after night with a barrage of cameras and lights ready for action. When the cat eventually pitches I was photographing with 3 cameras at the same time. All connected with Pocket Wizards, remote flashes, ground pods etc. 
It was worth every mosquito bite

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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