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Prehistoric Sharks

India brotherbear Offline
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#1

Big Texas Sharks:  http://www.livescience.com/52506-texas-supershark.html
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Kenya Jamarion Offline
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26 feet is extremely huge. Thumbs up for however managed to preserve the fossils for all that long. Can I find exact pics of the Texas Supershark anywhere? The fossils look interesting and i think an actual pic shall be interesting to look at.
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India brotherbear Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-02-2016, 05:33 PM by brotherbear )

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/a...s-ago.html

Megalodons were wiped out when killer whales invaded: Competition for food drove 60ft sharks to extinction 2 million years ago


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/a...z44fbMfFWW
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-27-2017, 04:10 AM by epaiva )

Carcharodon Megalodon

Credits to @dinosaurologia


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*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-06-2018, 04:44 AM by epaiva )

Carcharodon megalodon compared to Great White Shark

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-09-2018, 04:30 AM by epaiva )

Credit to Prehistoric Times

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India brotherbear Offline
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https://www.livescience.com/63361-megalodon-facts.html 
 
"Original calculations greatly overestimated the size of megalodon," William Paterson University Professor of environmental science, Marty Becker, a paleontologist who specializes in shark research, told Live Science. "This is in part related to the fact that the megalodon fossil record is dominated almost exclusively by teeth. Current calculations indicate that megalodon may have achieved lengths up to 10 meters [around 33 feet] and nothing like what is currently featured in the summer 2018 movie 'The Meg.'"
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United States genao87 Offline
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(09-08-2018, 04:22 PM)brotherbear Wrote: https://www.livescience.com/63361-megalodon-facts.html 
 
"Original calculations greatly overestimated the size of megalodon," William Paterson University Professor of environmental science, Marty Becker, a paleontologist who specializes in shark research, told Live Science. "This is in part related to the fact that the megalodon fossil record is dominated almost exclusively by teeth. Current calculations indicate that megalodon may have achieved lengths up to 10 meters [around 33 feet] and nothing like what is currently featured in the summer 2018 movie 'The Meg.'"


whoah,  only 33 feet/10 meters is the average?   way smaller than what was given.  He said current calculations...so its him and who else that calculated Meg to be this size.  so it is basically the size of a whale shark.
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India brotherbear Offline
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whoah,  only 33 feet/10 meters is the average?   way smaller than what was given.  He said current calculations...so its him and who else that calculated Meg to be this size.  so it is basically the size of a whale shark. 
 
*I don't think we will ever really know. I'm leaning more towards an average of about 40 feet (  12.19 m ). 
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India brotherbear Offline
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTPcq2Hc...9dR7KgiXNg
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India brotherbear Offline
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https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases...-xQ6ze4dDQ   
 
Was Megalodon The World's Largest Scavenger?

Author Max Hawthorne reveals surprising research from his Kronos Rising series.
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India brotherbear Offline
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...l9J21D1xYI   
  
What it takes to be a giant shark
Date:
January 24, 2019
Source:
Swansea University
Summary:
Have you ever wondered why the Megalodon shark became to be so big? Or wondered why some other sharks are much smaller? 
 
In a paper published by Evolution, research led by Swansea University's Dr Catalina Pimiento and co-authored by an international team of scientists from the UK, Europe and the USA examined the biological traits of all sharks and rays before running a series of evolutionary models to seek how gigantism evolved over time.

The results showed that for a shark to be giant, it would need to first evolve adaptations that enhance feeding such as the ability to control -- at least to some degree -- their own body temperature or become a filter feeder.
One of the most famous giant sharks, Megalodon -- the topic of 2018 Hollywood film The Meg -- was an active predator that could measure up to 18 metres in length and became extinct around two million years ago.
Meanwhile, the whale shark -- which is still around today -- can also reach 18 metres but isn't an active predator. Instead, it is a filter feeder and eats tiny plankton from the sea.
These two subjects formed key parts of the research, which centred on the tree of life for sharks, where the authors mapped characteristics relating to body size, like their thermo-regulatory capacity, feeding mechanism and diet

 
Researchers then found that sharks could become giants by following one of two possible evolutionary pathways; the mesothermic pathway, which consists of evolving the ability to self-control the temperature of their most important organs -- or the filter-feeding pathway, which consists of evolving the ability to feed on microscopic plankton.

The mesothermic adaptation allows sharks to live in different types of habitats -- including cold waters -- and also hunt more effectively. The filter-feeding adaptation allows sharks to eat the most abundant food in the ocean -- plankton.

However, there are risks involved for any shark following the evolutionary pathways that lead to gigantism. The mesothermic species need to consume big prey to maintain their high energetic demands, but when these prey are scarce, giant sharks are more susceptible to extinction. The scarcity of large prey in times of rapid climatic change was the most likely cause of the extinction of Megalodon.

While the filter feeders have shown more resilience, they are at risk of eating large volumes of toxic micro plastics that now can be found in the world's oceans -- thus threatening their extinction.

Dr Catalina Pimiento, lead researcher and Postdoctoral fellow at Swansea University, said:
"Sharks provide an ideal case study to understand the evolutionary pathways leading to gigantism in the oceans because they display contrasting lifestyles and adaptations, and because they have an evolutionary history of at least 250 million years."
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United States brobear Offline
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https://uwosh.edu/today/72140/uwo-biolog...QLl9EytlmA  
  
UWO biologist part of team that discovers ‘megalodon’ shark went extinct much earlier than previously thought

by Natalie Johnson | Feb 13, 2019 | Campus NewsResearchResearch News Home Page
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: Yesterday, 10:15 PM by epaiva )


*This image is copyright of its original author
Reimagining the Megalodon, the worlds most terrifying sea creature
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsoni...JSLl7By.01
Credit to Gary Staab
@GuateGojira
This a new exhibit of Carcharodon in DC
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-06-2019, 08:36 AM by epaiva )

Carcharodon Megalodon jaws displayed in Smithsonian Museum 
Credit to @iphotographsharks
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