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Prehistoric birds

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#1

Let us begin a new topic about the prehistoric birds which appeared after the first mammals, except if we consider that the avian-dinosaurs were in fact some birds...

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Discovered in China in 2002 Jeholornis was one of the first bird, having lived at the Early Cretaceous from 140 to 125 millions years BC. It was in fact a long tailed-avalian, 70 cm long and weighing 20 pounds. A little bit more evolved than the famous Archaeopteryx...
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#2

" Phorusrhacids, colloquially known as terror birds, are an extinct clade of large carnivorous flightless birds that were the largest species of apex predators in South America during the Cenozoic era; their conventionally accepted temporal range covers from 62 to 1.8 million years (Ma) ago.

They ranged in height from 1–3 m (3 ft 3 in–9 ft 10 in) tall. Their closest modern-day relatives are believed to be the 80-centimetre-tall (31 in) seriemas. Titanis walleri, one of the larger species, is known from Texas and Florida in North America. This makes the phorusrhacids the only known large South American predator to migrate north in the Great American Interchange that followed the formation of the Isthmus of Panama land bridge (the main pulse of the interchange began about 2.6 Ma ago; Titanis at 5 Ma was an early northward migrant). It was once believed that T. walleri became extinct in North America around the time of the arrival of humans, but subsequent datings of Titanis fossils provided no evidence for their survival after 1.8 Ma. However, reports from Uruguay of new findings of relatively small forms dating to 18,000 and 96,000  years ago would imply that phorusrhacids survived there until very recently (late Pleistocene). "

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#3

I repeat what it was said at #1, but with an other illustration:

Discovered in China in 2002 Jeholornis was one of the first bird, having lived at the Early Cretaceous from 140 to 125 millions years BC. It was in fact a long tailed-avalian, 70 cm long and weighing 20 pounds. A little bit more evolved than the famous Archaeopteryx... 



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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#4

Discovered in Patagonia (Argentina) in 1999, described in 2007, this bird enjoyed the biggest bird's skull that ever existed: 71,6 cm long. Should have lived during the Miocene. Belongs to the Phorusrhacinae family (essentially inside the South American continent), the "terror birds" having reached up to 3m20 high. This bird could have also been a fast runner.
 



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#5

Aepyornis , "Elephant bird" by Zdenek Burian
Weighing up to 540 kilos, endemic specy of Madagascar, extinct at least since the 11th century...

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#6

" Argentavis magnificens was among the largest flying birds ever to exist, quite possibly surpassed in wingspan only by Pelagornis sandersi, which was described in 2014. A. magnificens, sometimes called the Giant Teratorn, is an extinct species known from three sites in the Epecuén and Andalhualá Formations in central and northwestern Argentina dating to the Late Miocene (Huayquerian), where a good sample of fossils has been obtained. "


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