There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Predator Bite Force

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators
#1

https://www.scribd.com/document/22302099...Carnivores
 > GRIZZLY ( Ursus arctos horribilis ) the AMERICAN BROWN BEAR <  
  
             
1 user Likes brotherbear's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
****
#2

@brotherbear :

About #1: Do I dream ? But in your final table, the lion exemplary is always ahead of the tiger exemplary.

By making a copy/paste of the respectives numbers:



M. masseter :

Panthera leo:
Area: 12137.2    Force: 4490.8


Panthera tigris:

Area: 7968.1    Force: 2948.2


M. temporalis:

Panthera leo
Area: 13833.2    Force: 5118.3

Panthera tigris
Area:16345.5    Force: 6047.8


Bite force at:

Carnassial:
Panthera leo: 3405.4
Panthera tigris: 3007.2

Canine:
Panthera leo: 2152.3
Panthera tigris: 1859.3


Just saying... Perhaps a big lion and a small tiger.
2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#3
( This post was last modified: 12-06-2018, 09:45 AM by Pckts )

(12-06-2018, 06:34 AM)Spalea Wrote: @brotherbear :

About #1: Do I dream ? But in your final table, the lion exemplary is always ahead of the tiger exemplary.

By making a copy/paste of the respectives numbers:



M. masseter :

Panthera leo:
Area: 12137.2    Force: 4490.8


Panthera tigris:

Area: 7968.1    Force: 2948.2


M. temporalis:

Panthera leo
Area: 13833.2    Force: 5118.3

Panthera tigris
Area:16345.5    Force: 6047.8


Bite force at:

Carnassial:
Panthera leo: 3405.4
Panthera tigris: 3007.2

Canine:
Panthera leo: 2152.3
Panthera tigris: 1859.3


Just saying... Perhaps a big lion and a small tiger.

From taking a quick scan of the study I did notice the lion skull used was 57mm or nearly 2.2" larger.
The Total skull length for the lion is slightly over 14", that is a normal skull length for a Male lion while the Tiger skull is under 12", that would be a small Male skull or maybe a female's skull.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
3 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators
#4
( This post was last modified: 12-06-2018, 03:06 PM by brotherbear )

I often discover information that I don't really understand ( from same site ): https://www.scribd.com/document/22302099...Carnivores
I wish to know how the predators stack-up against each other in terms of bite force. 
 
 
144 P. C
HRISTIANSEN AND
 J. S. A
DOLFSSEN
Table 7.
 Muscle cross sectional areas of the main jaw adductors and bite force estimation for the included carnivores. All cross-sectionalareas are given as mm
2
, and all bite force values as Newtons. All areas and forces are for one side of the skull only
 M. masseter M. temporalis
 Bite force atSpecimen Area Force Area Force Carnassial Canine
 Ailurus fulgens
 1038.1 384.1 1375.2 508.8 335.9 225.7
Mustelidae
 Meles meles
 973.2 360.1 2521.0 932.8 255.2 184.2
Taxidea taxus
 1129.4 417.9 1592.9 589.4 322.8 217.9
Gulo gulo
 1106.8 409.5 2100.6 777.7 408.3 254.3Procyonidae
 Nasua nasua
 481.6 178.2 882.3 326.4 87.1 53.2
 Procyon cancrivorus
 1022.4 378.3 2129.3 787.9 267.5 180.8
 Procyon lotor 
 797.8 295.2 881.2 326.1 176.4 119.5
Ursidae
Tremarctos ornatus
 3588.5 1327.8 7187.3 2659.3 1536.8 1197.2
Ursus malayanus
 4995.1 1848.2 8116.1 3003.0 1441.7 1131.5
Ursus ursinus
 3168.1 1172.2 5632.8 2084.1 708.9 550.4
Ursus americanus
 3858.6 1427.7 9684.7 3583.3 1174.1 869.9
Ursus thibetanus
 3534.3 1307.7 8192.4 3031.2 819.8 607.4
Ursus arctos
 4974.3 1840.5 12164.1 4500.7 1417.6 1068.6
Ursus maritimus
 7558.4 2796.6 16859.9 6238.2 2403.9 1730.1
Canidae
 Nyctereutes procynoides
 564.3 208.8 880.4 325.8 108.9 74.8
Otocyon megalotis
 492.1 182.1 2478.1 176.9 86.6 59.4
 Fennecus zerda
 257.3 95.2 226.2 83.7 55.8 32.5
 Alopex lagopus
 707.1 261.6 1102.9 408.1 203.7 120.1
Vulpes vulpes
 957.9 354.4 1535.3 568.0 298.4 170.3
 Lycaon pictus
 2297.2 850.0 4905.9 1815.2 854.0 550.5
Speothos venaticus
 847.4 313.5 1035.2 383.0 272.0 170.1
Chrysocyon brachyurus
 2817.5 1042.5 3977.7 1471.8 725.3 435.6
Cuon alpinus
 1209.2 447.4 2735.6 1012.2 379.0 237.0
Canis lupus
 3940.6 1458.0 5097.2 1886.0 1262.3 743.0
Cerdocyon thous
 834.7 308.8 1109.0 410.3 182.7 113.3
 Dusicyon gymnocerus
 695.0 257.2 1269.2 469.6 205.4 120.1
 Lycalopex vetulus
 539.7 199.7 916.6 339.1 130.5 86.0
Viverridae
 Nandinia binotata
 215.9 79.9 400.9 148.3 54.1 38.0
 Arctictis binturong 
 1492.9 552.4 2181.7 807.2 356.7 256.7
Genetta genetta
 310.4 114.8 617.6 228.5 88.4 50.0
Civettictis civetta
 511.4 189.2 1059.6 392.1 148.4 104.7
Viverricula indica
 293.4 108.5 435.5 161.1 75.5 44.0
Hyaenidae
Crocuta crocuta
 3735.0 1381.9 8183.4 3027.9 1421.6 782.7
 Hyaena hyaena
 2745.4 1015.8 5890.0 2179.3 1041.5 576.5
 Hyaena brunnea
 2743.9 1015.2 7167.6 2652.0 1222.8 656.2
Felidae
 Neofelis nebulosa
 1628.0 602.4 3362.0 1244.0 587.8 337.3
 Panthera uncia
 2071.1 766.3 6957.1 2574.1 884.8 559.2
 Panthera pardus
 2528.0 935.4 7917.3 2929.4 1376.8 841.5
 Panthera leo
 12137.2 4490.8 13833.2 5118.3 3405.4 2152.3
 Panthera tigris
 7968.1 2948.2 16345.5 6047.8 3007.2 1859.3
 Panthera onca
 2521.3 932.9 8909.0 3296.3 1253.6 765.9
 Leopardus pardalis
 824.2 305.0 2142.5 792.7 256.9 164.8
 Leopardus wiedii
 447.8 165.7 977.4 361.6 112.6 73.5
 Leopardus tigrinus
 333.3 123.3 573.3 212.1 110.4 72.4
 Leopardus geoffroyi
 584.6 216.3 1151.4 426.0 180.8 118.3
 Lynx lynx
 1274.7 471.6 2623.9 970.9 454.9 286.4
 Acinonyx jubatus
 2584.4 956.2 3858.2 1427.5 635.1 434.6
 Puma concolor 
 2073.4 767.1 5450.7 2016.8 905.6 584.3
 Herpailurus yagouaroundi
 449.7 166.4 700.4 259.2 104.6 66.1
 Pardofelis marmorata
 558.5 206.6 802.3 296.9 151.4 96.5
 Felis chaus
 703.2 260.2 2149.0 795.1 294.6 183.4
 Ictailurus planiceps
 543.9 201.3 1045.5 386.8 172.4 106.2
 Prionailurus bengalensis
 412.7 152.7 951.6 352.1 93.7 58.5
 Leptailurus serval 
 704.7 260.7 1822.3 674.2 223.2 151.4
Caracal caracal 
 853.0 315.6 2338.0 865.1 203.8 136.4
 Profelis aurata
 1052.5 389.4 2158.9 798.8 281.5 185.2
 > GRIZZLY ( Ursus arctos horribilis ) the AMERICAN BROWN BEAR <  
  
             
2 users Like brotherbear's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#5

Another:
Comparative bite forces and canine bending strength in feline and sabretooth felids: implications for predatory ecology 

PER CHRISTIANSEN

https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/arti...23/2630862

RESULTS

The average values for the extant felids are shown in Table 1, and the sabrecat values are shown in Table 2. The tiger has, as expected, the highest average values, both in terms of bite forces and canine bending strengths, but its bite forces are virtually identical to those of the lion (Table 3). However, the large canines of tigers appear sturdy compared with those of lions, despite being proportionally slightly longer. The jaguar also has sturdy canines, whereas the very long canines of the clouded leopard (Nnebulosa) are proportionally more slender compared with the estimated bite forces (see also below). There is a strong relationship between bite forces at the canines and carnassials and body mass among extant felids (Fig. 2; see eqns 3, 4, above), and both regression slopes are distinctly allometric (P < 0.001).




@brotherbear 
These two are good studies that will help with understanding the muscle and skull functions.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.22518


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932386/



If we're looking for a definitive "bite force" winner then we may never know, a lot of factors come into play that can change the results but regardless you can pretty much assume that a 200kg Panthera will have far more than enough of a bite force to get the job done.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
5 users Like Pckts's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB