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Musteloids and Mongoose

Canada Kingtheropod Online
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#1
( This post was last modified: 02-17-2017, 09:16 AM by Kingtheropod )

Hello, this topic will contain information relating to some of the smallest members of carnivora, Weasels, Mongooses, and other relatives of this group.

Mustelidae (The Weasel family)


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http://www.lynxeds.com/hmw/plate/family-...-relatives

Mongoose (Herpestidae)



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http://indianmongoose.weebly.com/species...ption.html
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Canada Kingtheropod Online
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#2

Fisher spotted in Iowa state for first time in 150 years


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http://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/wonder/tr...spartanntp
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Canada Kingtheropod Online
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#3

Mongooses live longer after growing up in tough conditions, research shows

Quote:Growing up in tough conditions can make wild animals live longer, new research suggests.
Scientists found that male banded mongooses that experienced poor conditions in their first year had longer lives, suggesting those born into a challenging environment "live slow, die old", while those with an easier first year "live fast, die young".
However, there was no difference in the number of offspring they fathered.
The males that fathered the most pups were those that grew up when conditions were highly variable. These males also lived long lives, like those born into poor conditions.
"Growing up in a poor or unpredictable environment isn't necessarily bad - it can have advantages," said lead author Dr Harry Marshall, of the University of Exeter.
"It's not clear why variable early-life conditions were the best for male mongooses in terms of longevity and reproduction.
"It might be that male mongooses that experience different challenges in their first year are better prepared for those challenges later on."
The researchers used 14 years of data on wild banded mongooses in Uganda.
Rainfall was used as the measure of conditions, as the researchers found that more rainfall means more invertebrate prey for mongooses to eat.
Variable conditions were defined as those with large fluctuations between wet and dry periods.
Early-life conditions appeared to have no impact on the chance that individuals survived their first year. There was also no impact on females' longevity or reproductive success.
"It is surprising that early-life conditions affected males but not females," Dr Marshall said.
"We know that female mongoose survival is more sensitive to ecological conditions later in life, perhaps due to the greater demands pregnancy brings.
"This may hide any effects of conditions experienced during their first year.
"Studying these effects helps us understand how animals might be affected by future environmental changes."
Professor Michael Cant, who leads the long-term banded mongoose study, said: "In banded mongooses, as in humans, survival and health in later life depends on the conditions experienced during growth and development.
"Deciphering why these effects evolved through studies on wild animals has implications for human health."
:: The paper, Lifetime fitness consequences of early-life ecological hardship in a wild mammal population, is published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.




http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/vie...rch.639577
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India brotherbear Offline
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#4

Closely related to the Mustelidae are the Mephitidae:
                                                                           
*This image is copyright of its original author
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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India brotherbear Offline
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Carnivore Phylogeny: 
                              
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 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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India brotherbear Offline
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Which is really the largest mustelid, wolverine or sea otter?
 

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Canada Kingtheropod Online
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#7

Wolverine preservation project underway in Montana

Quote:HELENA -
One of the rarest animals in Montana gets a fresh look as Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks reports new efforts to conserve the wolverine.
Bob Inman of FWP says the agency will produce the first ever documentation of where wolverines presently occur in the lower 48 states.
“They are fierce. They are an animal that a lot of people find interesting. There’s mystery to them because they are so rare and so little had been learned about them,” Inman said. 
FWP’s Winston Greely said wildlife managers from across Wyoming, Montana, Idaho and Washington set out this winter to get a more accurate picture of wolverines in the west.
The multi-state, multi-agency monitoring project is part of a broader conservation program focusing on preserving wolverines along their southern range, Greely said.
The monitoring project conducted by federal and state agencies and volunteers is currently underway, but the main goal of the wolverine conservation program is to preserve the animal before it is too late.
“We know we need to connect the current existing populations of wolverines. We know we could make a positive benefit for the species by restoring them to places where they existed in the past, but haven’t for the last 100 years. And then we need to monitor the population to have some idea of whether the population is stable, increasing or decreasing,” Inman said.
Inman says the project is designed to make progress for the species on the ground and he’s excited see a group coming together to move forward in that way.
The monitoring project will continue through April.


http://www.krtv.com/story/34366386/wolverine-preservation-project-underway-in-montana
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-19-2017, 02:34 AM by Ngala )

Great initiative.

Beech marten (Martes foina) from Iran.

From My Journey with Persian Leopards:
"Stone marten in Salouk National Park, martens are very difficult to see in wild. Before camera traps, almost no image of a live marten was available in the country of thse very elusive and shy creatures."

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Canada Kingtheropod Online
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#9
( This post was last modified: 02-19-2017, 06:07 AM by Kingtheropod )

This picture was posted back in 2015 by Martin Le-May where a least weasel apparently got a ride on a woodpecker. The weasel apparently was trying to kill the bird, but failed. Fake or real?


*This image is copyright of its original author
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India brotherbear Offline
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Fake or real? So much fakery these days. However, stranger things have been known to happen.
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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India sanjay Offline
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#11

This is real, I have seen this image on FB
"There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, there is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not Man the less, but Nature more" --Lord Byron
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#12

Weasel Rides Woodpecker in Viral Photo—But Is It Real?
By Jason Bittel, National Geographic 
PUBLISHED MARCH 4, 2015
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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India brotherbear Offline
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#13

Nice find Ngala.
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#14

Photo and information credits: Dave Pusey Photography
Not something you see every day, a Cape Clawless Otter close to Lower Sabie this week.
A female and a sub adult were scouring the rock pools for food, they are in the same family as Honey Badgers and boy do they have the same swagger and attitude!


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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#15

(02-17-2017, 12:35 PM)brotherbear Wrote: Which is really the largest mustelid, wolverine or sea otter?
 

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

Not really a mystery. Male wolverines are 11.3-18.2 kg, male sea otters are 21.8-45 kg.
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