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Muscular Differences and Structures in Various Animals

United States Polar Offline
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#1
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As various members saw in the "Animal Art" thread, I did a anatomical drawing of the muscular systems of both the tiger and human (both male and female), respectively. I've done plenty of research about the muscular structures of various animals and the differences in muscular structure. As far as I know, carnivores have a vastly different (and more powerful) muscular structure than primates or herbivores in terms of microscopic differences.

Anyone have any supporting data about muscular systems to put here? 

I will start putting my own data.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

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United States Polar Offline
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#2


*This image is copyright of its original author


The forearm muscles of Smilodon seem to be much thicker than those of the lion, as well as shorter muscle fiber lengths. The "wrist-band" like tendon around the wrist is also thicker than that of the lion. Quite robust in musculature. But no exact muscle fiber (fast-twitch vs slow-twitch) representation.


*This image is copyright of its original author


This particular drawing seems to portray the lion has having a large amount of IIa/x fibers on his upper leg. Same should be true of other felines.


*This image is copyright of its original author


The biceps, triceps, and upper leg areas of this camel are either drawn particularly light or are made to represent fast-twitch fibers. Makes sense as camels are known to abduct their legs upwards in much quicker motion than horses.
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United States Polar Offline
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#3


*This image is copyright of its original author


The gorilla here looks to have a calf muscle of extreme fast-twitch IIb disposition, and some extremely white IIb fibers are also on the forearm area. 

But the rest of him is red since primates in general have a very near-equal proportion (50/50 with minimal difference) of slow versus fast-twitch fibers, including the strongest representations of us.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

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United States Polar Offline
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#4

Here are several pictures of Rhino, Elephant, and Hippo muscular anatomy:

RHINO


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


HIPPO


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


ELEPHANT


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

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United States Polar Offline
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#5

Notice that the rhino has a thick muscle connecting its elbow joint to its torso, indicating greater backwards limb mobility. And actually, the hippo has more robust (shorter, yet thick) limbs, my bad.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#6
( This post was last modified: 01-27-2017, 05:23 AM by Pckts )

I tried to order the tiger from Jun's collection but unfortunately he was having manufacturing problems and was unable to get it out to me in time so I decided to cancel the order. Very unfortunate as they were something that really interested me and I would of loved to have it on display.
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United States Polar Offline
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#7

I was planning on buying the whole animal set, but the Smilodon and tiger ones were out of stock...
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India brotherbear Offline
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*This image is copyright of its original author
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India brotherbear Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-07-2017, 11:38 AM by brotherbear )

Lion, Tiger, Smilodon, and others one sixteenth scale models. Most of you younger guys probably have no idea what a scale model is. They were very popular during the '50's and '60's. https://www.junsanatomy.com/
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Canada HyperNova Offline
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#10
( This post was last modified: 01-13-2018, 11:45 AM by HyperNova )

Interesting comparison between the human type I, type IIa and type IIax muscle fiber, the lion type I and type IIx muscle fiber and the caracal type I and type IIx muscle fiber.

Type I is a slow twitch muscle fiber and type IIa, IIax and IIx are fast twitch.

*This image is copyright of its original author

B = maximum absolute force (how much force they can exerce)
C = maximum specific force (how much force they can exerce relative to their size.)
F = maximum power output

Comparison between human type IIax, lion type IIx and caracal type IIx :

*This image is copyright of its original author

Source : Lion (Panthera leo) and caracal (Caracal caracal) type IIx single muscle fibre force and power exceed that of trained humans
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United States Polar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-02-2018, 10:59 AM by Polar )

One thing I've noticed is that heart disease and cardiac arrest is the second-leading natural highest death for many humans and both wild/captive apes. On the other hand, bears have much stronger hearts, with polar bears able to move with extremely high intensity (for a prolonged period) even at 60% bodyfat.

Even accounting for body size, hearts of primates seem to be weaker?

I'll provide the data later today. Right now 1 A.M and have to get some sleep.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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United States Polar Offline
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#12

From CarnivoraForum, someone posted sources for bodyfat percentages and muscle mass percentages from a wide array of animals.

Primates:

   

   
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- Roy T. Bennett
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United States Polar Offline
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#13

Carnivores:

   

   
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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United States Polar Offline
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#14

Even-toed unglates:

   
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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United States Polar Offline
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#15
( This post was last modified: 04-16-2018, 05:20 AM by Polar )

Odd-toed ungulates, rodents, xenarthans, whales, and marsupials:

   

   

   

   
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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