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Modern Weights and Measurements of Wild Lions

United States Pckts Offline
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#1

Not quite wild but Kevin Richardsons Male lions average between 190kg and the heaviest was 210kg
"Thank you for your interest shown in our lions.

Aslan’s operation was a success thank you and I am sure he is in a lot less pain having had his teeth repaired.

They were on average between 190 kg and heaviest if I recall was 210 kg.

No not really difference in the tawny vs white

Best Wishes,
Mandy"




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Koch's 272kg lion

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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United States Pckts Offline
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#2

A big male lion immobilized by the CKLR project, possibly the 222kg specimen.
"Central Kalahari Lion Research Project. On their old website it was stated that the biggest of the 4 males they had collared at the time (about 3 years ago) weighed 222kg. Also, in the book “Cry of the Kalahari” written by researchers, Mark and Delia Owens it is stated that a pair of young adult males each weighed over 450lbs (205kg). The Owens did collar some of the lions they studied but it’s not clear whether these lions were actually weighed or whether this was an estimate."



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Excerpt from “Cry of the Kalahari” pertaining to the weight of 2 young adult males from the Central Kalahari GR in Botswana.

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..Puyol is some of the largest lion I’ve ever seen; his tail base as thick as my arm, and he weighs (if we can trust a non-perfect scale) around 235 kg. Mind you, perhaps 25% of that was his latest large meal.

http://www.africadreamsafaris.com/blog/?p=18361



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Early on one Saturday morning the GVI research team helped to locate two adult lions (Panthera leo) living on Karongwe Private Game Reserve. Zero the dominant male and Maggie a mature female had to be found for a darting to re-collar them with new radio collars. Karongwe’s two research focus lions are huge animals. While sedated and lying at rest, Zero took up the entire length and width of a pick-up truck bed, his shoulder stands over a meter in height and he weighs in at 230 kilos, just less than 450 pounds. We helped to pour and rub cool water over his coat to keep his body temperature down while the veterinarian monitored his vital signs. Another wildlife veterinarian set out to dart Maggie, who arrived later in another pick-up on a huge mattress with handles. The volunteers helped unload Maggie from the truck and gently position her in the shade so her health could be quickly checked and she could be re-collared before her sedative wore off.

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Zero and Maggie are gorgeous and spectacular animals when awake, it is so amazing to look into their golden eyes as they stare you down at close range, but to rub and touch them while they were sedated was amazing. Zero’s whole body is solid, magnificently contoured muscle, covered by a sleek coat of shiny fur that is more course and short than I would have imagined. My favorite were his paws; each front paw is literally bigger than my face, but looks exactly like that of a house cat, right down to the rough pads made for silent stalking and retractable claws set on their bony knuckles.

I felt elated and amazed to be present and have the chance to get so close to an animal I’ve been admiring for the past four weeks of my expedition. My excitement was only matched by the joy I felt at seeing Zero and Maggie the next morning, less than 24 hours after awaking from their re-collaring. They and the rest of the pride had taken down a large female Kudu and by the time we found them in the morning sun just before 8:00am, they had consumed about 50% of their most recent meal. Zero was dragging the heavy carcass through the tall golden grass into the shade of an Acacia tree to finish off his breakfast.

Amber Herzog Lyman, Volunteer, USA


http://gvisouthafrica.blogspot.com/2009/...lions.html
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Pckts Offline
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#3

AfriCat Namibia 

THIMBA’S mother was poisoned when she left the Etosha National Park in search of easy prey on a neighbouring farm. THIMBA was trapped by a farmer who felt compassion for this cub. The farm-owners called AfriCat North and on 10 November 2007, THIMBA and his 3 siblings were transported to the Foundation’s Lion Sanctuary. He had a few injuries due to the cage-trap, but was in a good condition.

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NAME: Thimba
GENDER: Male
AGE: (2016) 8 turning 9 this years
WEIGHT: (2013) 160Kg (2014) 195Kg (2015) 177Kg
ORIGIN: Northern Namibia, bordering Etosha National Park.
SIBLINGS: Shavula
COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Shavula
REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Captive reared, habituated and now too old for release.
THIMBA means lion hunter in Swahili, and was born in the wild, but his mother was killed. He was approximately 6 months old when he was caught in a cage trap on a cattle farm, along the borders of the Etosha National Park.

#AfriCat #namibia #carnivore #conservation #endangered #lions #ambassadors #saveourlions #thimbathelion #RIP

His brother SHAVULA is still in our care at the AfriCat Carnivore Care Centre & continues his work as AfriCat Lion Ambassador for those of you who would be INTERESTED IN ADOPTING SHAVULA, please see link below for further instructions.

THANK YOU!

http://www.africat.org/index.php?option=...3Aadoption
— at Okonjima Lodge.

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INTRODUCING SHENZI
GENDER: Male
AGE: (2016) 8 years
WEIGHT: (2013) 181.9Kg (2014) 182Kg (2015) 189Kg
ORIGIN: Etosha National Park. (on a farm bordering ENP)
SIBLINGS: None
REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Captive reared, habituated and now too old for release.
Shenzi is one of our lions at AfriCat's Carnivore Care Centre.
Shenzi (meaning 'leader of the pack') was found weak and near death, at a waterhole on a cattle farm, bordering the world-renowned Etosha National Park. As we have no precise record of how Shenzi lost his mother, we suspect that the lioness left the confines of Etosha to hunt on neighbouring farmland.
Here, she gave birth to two known cubs: one cub of the same size was found dead at the very same waterhole, 2 weeks prior to Shenzi’s rescue. As farmers cannot tolerate these large predators amongst their livestock, they make use of gin traps and poison; we suspect that Shenzi’s mother was poisoned.
AfriCat North drove approx. 150 km to collect Shenzi from these compassionate farmers. Shenzi spent his first month at AfriCat North in a small enclosure, as de-worming medication as well as a dose of antibiotics, were administered.
Each day he would devour a piece of fresh meat; Shenzi grew so fast that after the first 2 weeks we had difficulty holding him whilst administering the medication. From the start, Shenzi kept his distance from humans and would not become any tamer – as AfriCat does not wish to habituate wild lions, after a month Shenzi was released into a 1 hectare enclosure, next to a group of 4 larger cubs who had been rescued from farmland adjacent to the Etosha NP, 6 months prior...
To continue reading up on Shenzi's life and all his most recent news please follow the link below ...
#AfriCat #Namibia #carnivore #conservation #lions #savelions #humanwildlifeconflict #wildlifeconservation
http://www.africat.org/index.php…


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Shenzi with his new adopted pride, a few months after his arrival...

To continue reading up on Shenzi's life and all his most recent news please follow the link below ..

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States chaos Offline
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#4

A couple of inconsistencies noted in post # 2. Lions don't consume 25% of their body weight, and 230 kgs is over 500 lbs, not just under 450 lbs.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#5

Uganda Carnivore Program
Lioness Anna
We are sorry to report that Anna was euthanized last Sunday, 28 December, after she attacked a woman in Hamukungu.
When we arrived at the scene, UWA was thankfully already there along with the park’s law enforcement warden. UWA had already darted Anna in the kraal of the woman who was attacked. Apparently it started earlier that morning when the woman and her two grandsons went to the kraal to check on the cows. This is when they encountered Anna. The boys managed to run back into the house, but Anna attacked the woman, injuring her leg.
Anna had become increasingly frail the last several months and her condition was deteriorating rapidly the last week. She had just entered a kraal on Christmas Eve and killed a cow and injured another.
It was clear she was becoming an increasing danger to the entire community of Hamukungu, in her weakening state.
After careful consideration and much discussion about all possible alternatives, a joint decision was made to euthanize Anna.
Anna was 17 years old and was the longest-monitored lion in the park. We have learned a lot about human-lion conflict through our many years of monitoring her movements. Anna was one tough lioness. She somehow managed to survive the poisoning of her close sister and 8 other pride members back in 2009 after they preyed on Hamukungu cattle. We lost track of her for over a year and feared the worst until we found her again in August 2013 and managed to replace her radio collar.
Here is one of the last photos of Anna – taken Christmas Eve afternoon. At the time of her death, she weighed only 90kgs, down from 130kgs in August 2013 when we darted her to replace her collar. We also include a photo of her from that day.
Her one-year-old cubs will be OK with Anna’s 2 adult daughters and their offspring. The cubs spent most of their time with these lionesses anyway as Anna frequently went off on her own the last several months. Fortunately, the rest of her pride was not nearby when this attack happened.
The woman who was attacked remains in hospital in Kasese. We are closely following her recovery, and our thoughts and concerns are with her and her family.



Anna - after recollaring her on 28 August 2013.


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Last photo of Anna - 24 Dec 2014.

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#6

A 30% weight change shows how rapidly and drastically cat weights can change, great find @Pckts .
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#7
( This post was last modified: 01-27-2017, 10:26 AM by Kingtheropod )

(01-27-2017, 01:23 AM)tigerluver Wrote: A 30% weight change shows how rapidly and drastically cat weights can change, great find @Pckts .

True, but you need to keep in mind that lioness looks very underweight in the December photo. She should have gained at least 20 kg in order to be healthy. I think that led her to hunt in populated areas. RIP
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United States Pckts Offline
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#8


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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Pckts Offline
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#9

AfriCat Namibia
Well done to our AfriCat North team for successfully re-collaring Liluli (Hpl-7)!

If you want to know more about our Lion Research conducted up north on the south western boundary of Etosha, please follow the AfriCat Foundation page!


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LILULI (Hpl-7) COLLAR REPLACEMENT
Hpl-7 was first collared in June 2015, at the Etosha Roadside waterhole. LILULI, (meaning ‘Dust’ in the Lozi language) is one of three known lionesses of the Roadside Pride aka – Hobatere Campsite Pride, totaling 10, with her three cubs (one male, 2 females).
The GPS-Satellite function of Hpl-7’s first collar, generously donated via Stichting SPOTS, lasted approx. 15 months, with the VHF component still accessible until we replaced it on Sunday 07 May 2017.
Big thanks to our Dutch Charity group, Stichting Spots for once again, sourcing our latest sponsors who funded the new GPS-Satellite collar fitted on Liluli at 05h30 this past weekend.
The bait was set against a huge Combretum tree, soon to be discovered by Liluli’s very hungry 3-some; they had been left on their own for a day or 2, probably out of harms way whilst Liluli was on the hunt. By approx. 3am, Liluli’s call could be heard in the distance, the cubs followed, in a hurry to meet up with their Mom; at that point, we thought that we had seen the last of them, but after tracking, we found that Liluli had most likely not been successful and all seemed interested in the last morsels left by the cubs. Wary, as all lionesses should be, we had to take the first best opportunity to dart her before she disappeared into the fading moonlight.
The dart hit home at 05h30; approx. 20 minutes later we eventually found her lying in the long grass amongst dense Mopane trees. The immobilization went well, her vitals were satisfactory, bloods and various other samples were stored, she weighed in at 148 kg.
Hpl-7 recovered from her ordeal approx. 2.5 hours after she was sedated, to her entire pride calling and encouraging her to join them. As she tried to stand, her three cubs began licking her and purring, a sight that brought tears to most of us looking on.
Another great moment for Lion conservation!
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States chaos Offline
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#10

That's a nice sized lioness
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United States Pckts Offline
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#11

AfriCat Namibia

DAY 2
Day 2 began with an early morning release of two cheetah from the previous day, Mulder and Abbey, just as the sun peeked over the horizon. These two cheetah were kept overnight for observation.
As the day progressed we darted and immobilized four cheetah, namely Spitfire, Sniper, Peanut and Curly. They all underwent a routine health check and dental check, and were all found to be in excellent health.
This brought us to the end of a busy morning.
After lunch we darted and immobilized one of our male lions, Shenzi. It took an army to get him onto the scale and then onto the table for the checks, not surprising since this large male weighs a whopping 190kgs!!! Shenzi was also found to be in great health.
Following this our lovely leopard, Lewa was darted, immobilized and checked, she too was found to be in good health, apart from a possible trace of arthritis in her front right elbow. The veterinarians felt best to treat her with anti-inflammatories and they will continue to observe her in her camp over the next couple of days for any improvement.
Another successful day finally came to a close and we all gathered for dinner at The Main Camp, where we bid farewell to our outgoing group of volunteers from Ultimate Safaris, USA, who did an excellent job in assisting us over the past couple of days!
We also welcomed our new group of volunteers joining us from Steppes Discovery travel, UK. They will start assisting us from tomorrow onwards with this very important work which would not be possible without the help from these wonderful volunteers.



"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States TheLioness Offline
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#12
( This post was last modified: 01-17-2018, 11:18 PM by TheLioness )

TheAfricatfoundation "lioness spots - we weighed her (158 kg)"

Hpl-6 lower broken jaw male 200 kg
Hpl-7 154 kg
Hpl-9 weighed 244kg
Hpl-10 weighed 213kg

A lot of great information in here.
http://www.africat.org/projects/africat-hobatere-lion-research-project/ahlrp-update-2016
The lioness has rejoined her cub, and all is right in the jungle.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#13

(01-17-2018, 11:11 PM)TheLioness Wrote: TheAfricatfoundation "lioness spots - we weighed her (158 kg)"

Hpl-6 lower broken jaw male 200 kg
Hpl-7 154 kg
Hpl-9 weighed 244kg
Hpl-10 weighed 213kg

A lot of great information in here.
http://www.africat.org/projects/africat-hobatere-lion-research-project/ahlrp-update-2016

Lions were baited 

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Visual 1 (left): unknown female (capture ID Hpl-8), Visual 2 (right): unknown male (capture ID Hpl-9); (camera trap photographs showed them together with an adult female (pers comm. W.Mare, farm Arendsnes)

Immobilization time of both
17.08.2015: at 22h42  
The male (Hpl-9) was anaesthetised at 23h05

Large cats none the less, them being cattle killers as well, I wonder how everything turned out for them. We discussed these guys a while back, if I remember correctly, it was Vokel who was the most impressive Lion but his weight was unknown. 
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States TheLioness Offline
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#14

Yes lions were baited, not sure the weight one would adjust for them. large lions indeed though.
The lioness has rejoined her cub, and all is right in the jungle.
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#15

It looks like the Hpl-9 244 kg male may only be 3-4 years old. Even if we assume 10-20 kg of bait that won't be assimilated to maintain his frame, he's probably going to hit the 240 kg mark in a few years comfortably. Might be another one for the modern record books.
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