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Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards

United States Pckts Offline
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#16
( This post was last modified: 03-03-2017, 03:44 AM by Pckts )

Not a chance... Odd that these hunters all manage to kill 200lb leopards yet 95% of leopards weighed don't pass 80kgs
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-04-2017, 02:27 AM by Ngala )

From The Hunting Report

190-Pound Leopard Taken In Tanzania
(posted September 05, 2008)
Get a load of this! Hunter Marrs Bowman killed this 190-pound leopard in Tanzania while hunting with PH Alistair James of Tanzania Wildlife Company. Bowman hunted in the Lake Natron South GCA area of Maasailand. 

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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Beautiful male from Namibia. Click on the link for watch the video.

Rescuing a Fierce Leopard: See What It Takes
What would you do if you came face-to-face with a 175 pound, agitated leopard? If you're conservation power-couple Marlice and Rudie van Vuuren, you've been on the receiving end of such a scenario about 112 times. 

As conservationists and National Geographic Big Cat Initiative grantees, the van Vuurens are on the frontlines of human-wildlife conflict and have translocated more than one hundred big cats in less than a decade in order to mitigate that conflict. Watch the video to see how one epic leopard translocation unfolds.

National Geographic also sat down with the couple at their wildlife sanctuary, N/a’an ku se, to talk about their work.

National Geographic: How did you get started in conservation work? What was your inspiration?

Marlice: When we started N/a’an ku sê Wildlife Sanctuary ten years ago, we got in cheetahs and leopards, and we realized we could not only take animals in, we had to deal with the source of the problem. Farmers normally would catch cheetahs and leopards with capture cages. It's almost like a farming practice—everybody in Namibia has a capture cage or two. The farmers would start putting the cages out the minute they start losing livestock to the carnivores.

National Geographic: How does your Rapid Response Unit get involved?

Marlice: The rapid response team will get a call, usually it's about either a leopard or a cheetah, and we analyze the problem first—what did this poor animal do wrong? —and then we will make a decision what the next step would be. Does this animal need a collar, or can we release the animal without a collar on the same property, or do we need to remove the animal?

Rudie: The first prize for us is to release that animal on the spot. If we can convince the farmer that this is not really a problem animal and that it's an opportunistic livestock raider, then we sometimes can release it on sight. 

Second prize for us would be if the farmer agrees that we collar and release the animal there and then, and then we get data downloads from the collar every day. The collar has VHF and satellite units and we can see exactly where the animal is. We share that with the farmer and he often shares that with his neighbors. He starts seeing how these animals move, we inform him when we see a kill pattern on the downloads, and ask him to go and look at what is the prey that that animal caught, is it natural prey or is it livestock? This is how we engage with the farmers and how we work with them. Farmers are some of the best conservationists in this country.

One of our last resorts is to translocate that animal to a protected area. If we do that, we have to make sure that animal goes into an area where there's no impact on other predators in the area, where there's enough prey, where there's enough water, where conflict won't reoccur, and that it's at a sufficient distance so that they don't show homing instinct. 

National Geographic: Why is there such high likelihood of having big cats on farmland in Namibia? 

Rudie: Cheetahs and leopards in Namibia occur mostly outside of protected areas, and that is mostly commercial farmland, so the chances of conflict are very high because the farmers, that's their livelihoods. After we've collared and released the cheetah or leopard, we would ask farmers to name their cat. It's that personal relationship that the farmer actually starts building up with the animal. We have a few farmers that if we one day didn't send a data download from the collar, they would phone and say, "Where is my cheetah? Where is my leopard download?" When we talk about human-wildlife conflict we always look at the wildlife side of things, but there's a human component. 

Marlice: Remember, we are both Namibian. We have our own cattle here, we have our own sheep, and our own goats here. We practice what we preach. We don’t go out trying to say, "You shouldn't do it like this and you should do it like that." We basically go there and say, "This is what works, try it or leave it, and speak to your neighbors." We come there as a farmer and somebody that just wants to help. We don't want to tell you what you're doing wrong, we come with options.

Rudie: In the nine years, we've learned more from farmers than we've learned from anyone else. You need to talk to people that are on the ground and know nature.

National Geographic: Why should someone across the world somewhere—who may never see a leopard in the wild—care about this?

Rudie: If we lose these carnivores, it will have severe effects to the ecosystem. We're going to have increased human disease. We've got swine flu, we've got HIV, we've got many other diseases that started because species disappear from the ecosystem. If carnivores disappear from our ecosystem, baboon numbers will go through the roof. If baboon numbers go through the roof, disease transmission between baboons and humans can increase and we could have another disease that could influence the whole world, and people will trace it back to Africa because leopards disappeared. I don't think people realize what the impact is if we lose a species. Everybody is at the disadvantage, not only the people that love them.
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United States stoja9 Offline
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#19

Can we stop with the human assholes posing with their dead kills?
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-07-2017, 11:40 PM by Ngala )

(03-07-2017, 08:21 AM)stoja9 Wrote: Can we stop with the human assholes posing with their dead kills?

I'm the first who doesn't like these pictures, but i find it interesting, not the photo of the leopards killed, but the fact of seeing these specimens from unknown areas, of which there are few details and pictures in nature. 

This is a thread to collect information on weights and measurements, as the title says, to be able to know better and to compare them from various areas of the world. If you search to Google "leopard zimbabwe", for example, you will notice the almost zero number of photos of leopards in the wild, but all hunted and killed. 

Moreover, this is the reality and the situation regarding some animals, and we should not hide ourselves, whether we like it or not. We can also fighting these things with the spread of images, with the indignation of the people so that doesn't happen again.
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United States Pckts Offline
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Credit to @Wildanimals for the original post

GRAPHIC CONTENT

Leopard shot at Frontier Safaris near Alicedale, Eastern Cape Province, SA. Apparently the owner, Barry Burchelle was hunting Jackal with dogs when it attacked the guide Dyan. Luckily Dale Venske shot it before it could kill Dyan. He has some serious damage to his face though. Leopard was big and weighed in at 113 Kg (112)


http://john1911.com/leopard-attacks-jackal-hunting-party/


*This image is copyright of its original author

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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(04-11-2017, 12:25 AM)Pckts Wrote: Credit to @Wildanimals for the original post

GRAPHIC CONTENT

Leopard shot at Frontier Safaris near Alicedale, Eastern Cape Province, SA. Apparently the owner, Barry Burchelle was hunting Jackal with dogs when it attacked the guide Dyan. Luckily Dale Venske shot it before it could kill Dyan. He has some serious damage to his face though. Leopard was big and weighed in at 113 Kg (112)


http://john1911.com/leopard-attacks-jackal-hunting-party/


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


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Fantastic find, what a huge male leopard... This really makes you think about how huge lions, tigers and jaguars can grow
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United States Pckts Offline
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(04-12-2017, 01:12 AM)Pantherinae Wrote:
(04-11-2017, 12:25 AM)Pckts Wrote: Credit to @Wildanimals for the original post

GRAPHIC CONTENT

Leopard shot at Frontier Safaris near Alicedale, Eastern Cape Province, SA. Apparently the owner, Barry Burchelle was hunting Jackal with dogs when it attacked the guide Dyan. Luckily Dale Venske shot it before it could kill Dyan. He has some serious damage to his face though. Leopard was big and weighed in at 113 Kg (112)


http://john1911.com/leopard-attacks-jackal-hunting-party/


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


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Fantastic find, what a huge male leopard... This really makes you think about how huge lions, tigers and jaguars can grow

There's always a "bigger fish."
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Italy Ngala Offline
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It's the same reported by Pckts in reply #11, nothing new. Anyway, is a beautiful specimen.
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-09-2017, 02:47 PM by Ngala )

LEOPARD IN THE CITY
By Kashish Das Shrestha
May 25, 2012
Originally published (May 25, 2012) in Republica national daily.

The rescued male leopard, weighing 42 kilos (92.5lbs), still in a trauma induced aggression, is caged within a cage for security. All Photos: Kashish Das Shrestha

*This image is copyright of its original author

In a corner of the Central Zoo’s office grounds in Jawalakhel is a metal cage covered in half by a sheet of black cloth. Lifting it reveals a second, smaller cage – 10 sq feet. It doesn’t take more than a few seconds to know who is in it: a loud growl, followed by a large charging leopard who hopelessly crashes into the walls of his metal cage. Then, its nose begins to bleed from the powerful impact. The nose had barely begun to heal from the first time it injured it while doing the exact same thing, repeatedly, day before yesterday when it regained consciousness and found itself in the dark alien confinement.

This large common leopard, weighing at 42 kilos (92.5lbs), was first spotted around 6 am in Maharajgunj, just north of Narayan Gopal Chowk on Tuesday, May 22.

By 9 am the authorities had been alerted and the Central Zoo’s Animal Rescue team, along with about 150 police personnel, had arrived at the scene: a large 3-story residence under construction.

At approximately 11 am, it was darted with the first tranquilizer. Then, moments later, the second. Soon, the sedated, and now captive cat, was on its way to the zoo.

The rescued leopard, in its observation cage at the Zoo. It injured its nose by repeatedly charging at the cage walls.

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“We are currently holding it in quarantine,” explained Bal Krishna Giri, the vet officer in the Animal Rescue team. “We have been making sure that he is alright, and conducting some basic tests we need to before it is released.”

“It is important to keep him under observation, and in the dark, so he calms down. His last public experience was being surrounded by hundreds of people,” added Radha Krishna Ghatri, the team’s vet assistant.

The release, however, will not be rehabilitation in its natural setting. Sarita Jnawali, project manager at the Central Zoo, explained that while they release rescued animals back into the wild any time that looks viable for the animal, this male leopard will become a member of the leopard exhibit at the zoo. All the leopards there now are female.

“We rescue almost seven to nine common leopards a year,” she explained. “But unfortunately, most times by the time we get to them they have been severely beaten by locals so quite a number of them end up dying even as we try to save them.”

The rescue team: Bal Krishna Giri and Radha Krishna Ghatri

*This image is copyright of its original author

Where They Come From, and Why

The leopards that appear in Kathmandu, it seems, are mostly coming from the Shivapuri-Nagarjuna forests. “We have encroached on so much of their space. And on top of that, there are very few preys for them in their natural habitat,” she explained. “So, they often end up coming out looking for food.”

“Dogs. They come and attack chicken farms and other smaller preys, but they love dogs,” Giri added. “They are good breeders too, giving birth to almost four to five cubs at a time.”

Leopards are not listed as endangered or threatened in Nepal at the moment, as their population is considered to be quite healthy. “However, we don’t really know if our common leopards are really common. There isn’t enough data on the current status of these animals in the wild here,” Sarita explained.

The Leopard exhibit cage at the Central Zoo in Kathmandu where the newly rescued male leopard will be kept with its current female residents.

*This image is copyright of its original author

With so many leopards being rescued each year, the 6-hectare zoo with a small cage for the leopard exhibit is hardly feasible. So what happens down the road?

“At the policy level, we really need to figure out a more viable solution to taking care of our rescued animals. Not all of them can be released back into the wild, or kept at the zoo,” Sarita said. “We need to develop sites where these animals can then be cared for until their natural death.”

Animals wandering into urban centers are hardly a shocking phenomenon the world over these days. American cities are grappling with wild coyotes. South Asia gets its dose of the scary elephant rampage every so often. It appears leopard population around Kathmandu is growing at a healthy rate. They will always need more space and food. But the Valley’s human population and appetite for real estate is escalating too, pushing the city boundaries further out all the time. Appearance of leopards in the city will seemingly only become more common as the city moves closer, or into, leopard territory.

And while there have been very few cases where they have attacked humans, mostly because a mob is often after the animal, there is no saying that the leopards will not become more aggressive, or show up in larger numbers.

“People easily forget the relationship of humans with natural ecologies, and wild species of all kinds,” Sarita added. “That will never serve us well.”

For now the Zoo says it is doing what it can, and is excited to finally add a healthy male leopard to its collection. How the leopard feels about that, we’ll never know.

A female leopard gets ready for her meat at the Zoo.

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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-25-2017, 03:58 PM by Ngala Edit Reason: Post adjustment )

From AfriCat Namibia:

Yesterday another big male, whom we have named MAWENZI, joined the AfriCat| Okonjima Leopard Density Project.

He is now officially the biggest collared cat in the Okonjima Nature Reserve, weighing in at 77.7kg and beating Madiba's weight by 1.7kg.

We've decided to focus on majestic mountain ranges to help inspire name choices for the next few collared animals. Mawenzi is one of three volcanic cones to make up Mount Kilimanjaro. 

Thanks to all for the great teamwork !!!

#AfriCat #Namibia #conservationphotography #wildlifeconservation #leopard #bigcats #research 
www.africat.org
© Louis Heyns

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( This post was last modified: 07-09-2017, 03:08 PM by Ngala Edit Reason: Post adjustment )

From AfriCat Namibia:

ISASKIA GETS A NEW COLLAR
Isaskia was first collared in 2013 and June 2016 her collar stopped working. She is extremely careful and thus getting her into a box trap was unlikely.

Then beginning 2017 she gave birth to 2 cubs so we put our trapping efforts on hold for the time being. Beginning May 2017 we set another trap but it was still too risky with the 2 cubs being at such a young age.

She started visiting the trap a few times but always with both cubs at her side. So on Saturday 17th June she showed up again and this time we decided to free dart her outside the trap in order to avoid upsetting the little ones.

The darting was a huge success & Isaskia now has a brand new collar and was reunited safely with her two youngsters. She weighed in at 43.2kg's.

#AfriCat #Namibia #wildlifeconservation #leopard #research #Okonjima
www.africat.org
© Richard Zaayman

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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-09-2017, 03:12 PM by Ngala )

Male leopard from N/a’an ku sê Wildlife Sanctuary, Namibia.

Photo and information credits: N/a’an ku sê
"On Friday 10th February our Rapid Response Team took to the roads to attend a carnivore-conflict situation regarding a male leopard caught in a capture cage some 110km outside Windhoek. 
The team worked with the conservation orientated farmers to fit a GPS collar on the 62kg magnificent male leopard so that we can begin gathering crucial data on his movements and assess whether or not he is predating on livestock."

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From AfriCat Namibia:

'The King in the North'
Sefu meaning “The Sword” was first spotted in 2013 on Okonjima around the Villa area. At that time it was Nkosi’s territory and they were seen a few times together. A territorial fight broke out and Nkosi ended up with severe head wounds. A box trap was then set to try and catch this new male but with no luck. Over the next 2 years he was spotted a few times by our guides all over the northern sections of the park. From Dam Lisa to Eland dam and up to North dam. From the start he was very relaxed with vehicles. Through out 2013 and 2014 box traps were set in the areas where he was seen but still luck wasn’t on our side. Our box traps have live camera feeds and he was only seen once at one of the traps. He stuck his head into the trap, pulled back and was never seen near a trap again. Either a super clever cat or maybe he was caught in a trap when he was younger somewhere else, survived it and still remembers that experience.

In February 2015 our fence patrol guys reported that there was a big leopard walking up and down the fence on the outside. We went to inspect and it was Sefu. He managed to slip through an open river swimmer (where the fence crosses over rivers) when the river came down. He wanted to come back in. Unfortunately there was no vet on Okonjima to dart him because it was a good opportunity to get a collar on him and he had an open wound below his right ear. We decided to drag him back in with a bait pulled behind a car through one of the fence gates. With little difficulty he went for the bait and we got him back in. After that he wasn’t seen for a good 6 months.

The reason we wanted to get a collar on him was for research purposes. He was a big male leopard with a huge territory and already relaxed with vehicles. It would have been very interesting to see where exactly he moves in the reserve and how big his territory really was.

Getting him in a box trap became a personal thing for me. How could I outsmart this cat. From different types of bait to heavily camouflaged traps. Big and small traps were used, raised off the ground to help him feel more secure instead of the trap on the ground, where Hyaena’s could surprise him from the behind. We even sprayed the traps with other leopard urine, which normally curates curiosity, but still he would not show himself. Through 2015,2016 and the first half of this year we kept on trying, moving the traps around through his territory but still no show. He was spotted maybe 5 or 6 times by our guides in this time. With our leopard density study in 2016 he only popped up a few times on the cameras, so he wasn’t even comfortable going for an open bait in a tree.

After a 4 year hunt for him our luck finally changed. Yesterday morning 13/08 at 03h15 he went into one of the traps set for him, which was raised off the ground in a tree and we got him. Why suddenly NOW, we will never know. Maybe he was just hungry. All the hard work and lots of patience finally paid off.

It was a very exciting day on Okonjima. He weighed in at 73kg. Body length 104cm and body height was 75cm. He is in a very good condition and in his prime. We estimated him around 8 years old.
Reported by Louis Heyns

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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-25-2017, 03:51 PM by Ngala )

From AfriCat Namibia:

This morning another male leopard was fitted with a VHF radio collar as part of Okonjima Lodge & AfriCat’s Predator Density Study.

'Pp 30' aka NEO was first detected in January 2016 on one of AfriCat’s trail cams and was also an occasional visitor to the steel mesh box traps that are distributed throughout the reserve. That time, NEO was still too young to be collared. Nevertheless he was spotted a few times by AfriCat’s field team as well as the Okonjima guides and always showcased a calm, relaxing aura in the presence of vehicles.

Today, we estimated his age around around 4 years, based on body stature and condition of his teeth. Still being a relatively young cat, NEO will definitely add a few more kilograms to his weight, which currently sits at 64 kgs. His body length was measured 111 cm, his shoulder height was 86 cm. Maxillary and mandibular canine ranged between 33 and 39 mm.

Besides being fitted with a radio collar, NEO underwent a routine check-up, was microchipped for identification purposes and received a preventative rabies shot.

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