There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---
Original post series Tigerluver has shared first original post series on WildFact.

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Largest Carnivourous Dinosaur Ever Found in Europe

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#1

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - In Europe 150 million years ago, this dude was the biggest, baddest bully in town. Two scientists in Portugal announced on Wednesday that they have identified the largest carnivorous dinosaur ever found in Europe, a 33-foot-long (10-meter-long) brute called Torvosaurus gurneyi that was the scourge of its domain in the Jurassic Period.
 
"It was indeed better not to cross the way of this large, carnivorous dinosaur," said paleontologist Christophe Hendrickx of Universidade Nova de Lisboa and Museu da Lourinhã in Portugal.Torvosaurus gurneyi was an imposing beast. It was bipedal, weighed four to five tons, had a skull almost 4 feet long, boasted powerful jaws lined with blade-shaped teeth four inches long, and may have been covered with an early type of feather, Hendrickx said."Torvosaurus gurneyi was obviously a super predator feeding on large prey like herbivorous dinosaurs," Hendrickx said.Remains of the new species were unearthed in Portugal by an amateur fossil hunter in 2003 in the rock cliffs of Lourinhã, a small town about 45 miles north of Lisbon, Hendrickx said. He said fossilized embryos probably belonging to this species were identified last year in Portugal.The findings were published in the journal PLOS ONE.At the time that Torvosaurus prowled the landscape, the region was a lush river delta with abundant fresh water and vegetation. The area teemed with dinosaurs and flying reptiles known as pterosaurs, primitive birds, crocodiles, turtles and mouse-sized mammals, according to paleontologist Octávio Mateus, also of Universidade Nova de Lisboa and Museu da Lourinhã.Plant-eating dinosaurs living in the area included the huge, long-necked Lusotitan, the armored, tank-like Dracopelta and the spiky-tailed Miragaia, Mateus added.The two scientists said this is the second species of the genus Torvosaurus. The other one, Torvosaurus tanneri, lived at the same time in North America. It was known from the states of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming and was identified in 1979.Its genus name, Torvosaurus, means "savage lizard." Its species name, gurneyi, honors James Gurney, the author and illustrator of the popular "Dinotopia" book series.Torvosaurus gurneyi was not the only meat-eating dinosaur in its neighborhood. For example, there was a European species of the well-known North American Jurassic predator Allosaurus, but the Torvosaurus found in Portugal was larger.Torvosaurus gurneyi not only is the largest known meat-eating dinosaur from Europe, but is the biggest land predator of any kind ever found on the continent, they added.There were larger dinosaur carnivores elsewhere, however.Tyrannosaurus in North America, Carcharodontosaurus and Spinosaurus in North Africa and Giganotosaurus in Argentina all were bigger, but appeared on Earth much later than Torvosaurus, during the Cretaceous Period that followed the Jurassic Period."This animal, Torvosaurus, was already a fossil for 80 million years before the T. rex ever walked the Earth," Mateus said.During the Jurassic Period from about 200 million years ago to 145 million years ago, carnivorous dinosaurs generally were medium-sized, with an average length of about 7 to 16 feet. Larger ones like Torvosaurus, Allosaurus and Saurophaganax arrived in the late Jurassic Period.(Reporting by Will Dunham; Editing by Grant McCool)
1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#2

Largest Carnivorous Dinosaurs Ever

*This image is copyright of its original author
Reply

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
#3
( This post was last modified: 09-16-2014, 11:22 AM by GuateGojira )

This image is no longer accurate. Check this topic:
http://wildfact.com/forum/topic-spinosaurus-news

There is the new image of Spinosaurus.
 
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#4

I don't see much of a difference, I used it more for scale than anything else.
Reply

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
#5
( This post was last modified: 09-17-2014, 10:08 AM by GuateGojira )

In length, you are probably right, although there is a significant reduction from 19 m long from Dal Sasso to the new 15 m long of the new estimation.

Also, the weight of 20 ton most be discarded completely, this giant was at the best between 6 to 9 tons. Very long but also light.

Finally, the old image show it as a tall animal, while the new reconstruction show him at barely 3 m tall at the hips.

For scale is good, but the old image is still inaccurate.

 
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#6
( This post was last modified: 09-17-2014, 11:52 PM by Pckts )

If you have better scales available, feel free to post them. I am certainly not as knowledgeable in Dinosaurs as I am in big cats.

 
Reply

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
#7
( This post was last modified: 09-18-2014, 10:29 AM by GuateGojira )

That will be hard, especially by the fact that there are already a group of "hard-core-spinosaurus-fans" that don't agree with the new form, and that sadly, swarm the popular places like Wikipedia (from where you get that old scale).

The good thing is that I can do it, after all, we have the new reconstruction of Spinosaurus and the amazing T.rex (and other predators) draws from Scott Harman. So, give me a few days and I will present the new image, although it will be just to be used here and not in other places.

If you want to know more on dinosaurs, just tell which ones do you need and I can get information about them.
 
1 user Likes GuateGojira's post
Reply

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
#8

I found this "new" image from Wikipedia:

*This image is copyright of its original author

It still show the bipedal form of Spinosaurus, but it show now its hip height. On the T.rex issue, I think that Sue was in fact, just slightly smaller than 4 m at the hip, so this image seems accurate, although should be a little taller.
 
1 user Likes GuateGojira's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB