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Javan Leopard (Panthera pardus melas)

Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2017, 02:35 PM by Ngala )

This thread is dedicated to the Javan Leopards. Share photos, videos, data and all information about these leopards.

The Javan Leopard (Panthera pardus melas) is a leopard subspecies that live only in the dense tropical rainforest of the Java Island, Indonesia. After the extinction of the Javan Tiger (P. tigris sondaica), it has become the largest carnivore in the island. In this population the melanic form is very common. It's a small leopard, the second smallest after the Arabian Leopard.

Classified "Critically Endangered" by "The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species", the population is estimated in 350-525 specimens, with <250 mature breeding adults (Ario et al., 2008); however, population is in rapid decreasing due to habitat loss, poaching, and prey base depletion.

Many photos, from Javan Leopard Release Programme - JLRP:

Javan Leopard (Panthera pardus melas) in Gunung Ciremai National Park, West Java, Indonesia. 
© TN Gunung Ciremai & CI-Indonesia 2013


*This image is copyright of its original author

Javan Leopard (Panthera pardus melas) on Mount Papandayan, West Java, Indonesia. 
© Agung Ganthar Kusumanto


*This image is copyright of its original author

A pair of rarely-seen juvenile Javan Leopards (Panthera pardus melas) pass by one of the Eye on the Forest camera traps set up by Chevron - Conservation International in Indonesia’s Mount Halimun-Salak National Park. 
© Chevron - Conservation International 


*This image is copyright of its original author

Javan Leopard (Panthera pardus melas) in the protected forest of Gunung Malabar, West Java. 
© Indonesia - Conservation International


*This image is copyright of its original author

Male Javan Leopard (Panthera pardus melas) captured by one of the camera traps positioned on the slopes of Mount Ciremai, West Java. 
The cameras had been installed by the Gunung Ciremai National Park's authority in order to confirm the presence of various animal species in the mountainous area. 
© Gunung Ciremai National Park's Biodiversity Assessment Team

*This image is copyright of its original author

A melanistic (or black) Javan Leopard (Panthera pardus melas) passes in front of a camera trap in Ujung Kulon National Park. 
Spotted and melanistic Javan Leopards (Panthera pardus melas) are both found in the park. 
© WWF 

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Two melanistic Javan Leopards (Panthera pardus melas) caught by a camera trap whilst walking through the forest of Gunung Halimun-Salak National Park.
© Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Great initiative Ngala, good pictures and info.
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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India sanjay Offline
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Very good thread @Ngala 
Keep it up
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2017, 02:33 PM by Ngala )

Javan Leopard caught on a camera trap installed in the forest of Gunung Halimun-Salak National Park.
© Age Kridalaksan / CIFOR

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*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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Two melanistic Javan Leopards caught with camera trap in Mount Tilu Nature Reserve. Credits to Erwin Wilianto.
"This two Javan Leopard footage captured in Mount Tilu, West Java, Indonesia. First he was scratching his claw on Puspa tree (Schima wallichii). after that he's leaving. And the second was captured just one and a half hour later. Seems he just patrolling on his territory."



"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2017, 02:33 PM by Ngala )

Camera traps reveal undiscovered leopard population in Javan forest
10 February 2017 / Hariyawan A. Wahyudi
Translated by Philip Jacobson

In an area where the big cats were long thought to have disappeared.
  • Government camera traps spotted three individuals in the Cikepuh Wildlife Reserve, along the southern coast of Indonesia's main central island of Java.
  • The environment ministry says 11 leopards are thought to exist in the sanctuary.
  • The Javan leopard is listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN.
In the Cikepuh area of Indonesia’s most-populated island of Java, leopards vanished long ago.

Or so people thought.

This week, the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry announced that hidden cameras had confirmed the presence of Javan leopards (Panthera pardus melas) in Cikepuh, a wildlife sanctuary along the island’s southern coast.

The animals, listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, were previously believed to have died out there in the early 2000s.

Only some 250 Javan leopards are thought to still roam throughout the island’s forests. Habitat loss, prey-base depletion, poaching and conflict with humans have decimated their numbers.

The species is still holding on in Cikepuh. The government’s camera traps spotted three individuals: two with yellow fur and black spots, and one with an all-black coat.

Eight more leopards are believed to inhabit the sanctuary, according to the ministry.

“The return of this species indicates that the sanctuary has been successfully restored,” ministry spokesperson Djati Witjaksono Hadi said in a statement.

This Javan leopard was caught on camera in the Cikepuh Wildlife Reserve in August 2016. Photo courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry

*This image is copyright of its original author

A black leopard spotted in Cikepuh last August. Photo courtesy of the environment ministry

*This image is copyright of its original author

Encroachment has been a problem in the area since the fall of strongman President Suharto in the late 1990s.

Before 2014, the presence of leopards in Cikepuh had never been comprehensively studied, said Erwin Wilianto, project officer at Forum HarimauKita, an NGO.

It was the previous year that reports of leopard sightings began to gain traction. Nearby cattle farmers said big cats emerging from the forest had attacked their calves.

A series of studies, including one by Bogor Agricultural University students, reinforced the notion that leopards might still exist the sanctuary. Researchers from International Animal Rescue, an NGO, found what appeared to be leopard footprints and droppings.

Last summer, the Natural Resources Conservation Agency, an arm of the environment ministry, installed the camera traps. Over 28 days, the three leopards were spotted seven times.

“The leopards’ presence in Cikepuh has finally been confirmed,” Wilianto told Mongabay.

Encroachment in some parts of Cikepuh isn’t as bad it once was, and the forest has begun to reclaim some areas, which makes for “very good for leopard habitat,” said Hendra Gunawan, head of the Javan Leopard Conservation Forum, an NGO.

“As long as it’s not encroached upon, the leopard population will be able to develop nicely,” he told Mongabay.

The leopards compose a small, isolated population. The next closest one is more than 200 kilometers away in Mount Jampang. The corridor that once connected the two areas is mostly farms now.

This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on October 14, 2016.
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2017, 02:34 PM by Ngala )

Male Javan Leopard caught with camera trap in Gunung Gede Pangrango National Park, West Java. Credits to Cl Indonesia.

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-18-2017, 12:07 AM by Ngala )

Male Javan Leopard caught with camera trap in Baluran National Park, East Java. Credits to Taman Nasional Baluran.
"Satu kata yang bisa kita ucapkan melihat foto satwa yang satu ini "Gagah". Ya, Taman Nasional Baluran merupakan salah satu habitat penting bagi Macan Tutul Jawa (Pathera pardus melas). Ditengah habitat dan populasi yang mengalami tekanan, upaya konservasi harus selalu kita lakukan demi kelestarian si Macan tutul Jawa ini."

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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Black perfection.

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Belgium Luipaard Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-02-2019, 11:41 PM by Luipaard )

Despite being small, they're quite robust


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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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Though the Javan leopard isn't as fierce a man-eater as its South Asian or African cousins, cases of man-eating or attacks on humans have been recorded. Hoogerwerf, Ujung Kulon: The Land of the Last Javan Rhinoceros, pages 399–401: https://books.google.com/books?id=pc4UAA...&q&f=false
   
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