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Herbivore dinosaurs...

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#1

Yes I should have started this topic a long time ago... Because the herbivore dinosaurs are also fascinating, and we know clearly and really only a little about them.

Let us begin !

The parasaurolophus : ornithopod of the Late Cretaceous in North America, Alberta, New Mexico, Utah. Only known from a few specimens, it's on of the rarest hadrosaurid although famous through its look (exploited in the "Jurassic Parc" and "Jurassic world"serie of movies).

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#2

A very famous dinosaur: the stegosaurus ! Late Jurassic period in the Western United States and the Portugal (North america and Europa weren't completely separated...). Heavily built, the largest individuals can reach 9 meters long and weigh 7 metric tons.

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#3

Classic face to face during the Jurassic period: ceratosaurus against stegosaurus.

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#4

Ankylosaurus: looking even more indestructible than stegosaurus. Very end of the Cretaceous period (from 68 to 66 millions of years) in Western North America. Measuring between 6 and 8 meters long, weighing between 4,8 and 8 tons.

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#5

Pachycephalosaurus: late Cretaceous in North America, (Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming). Able to reach 4m50 long and and weigh 450 kilograms. He had a short head covered by a bony dome.

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#6

Nice depiction of - feathered ? - pachyrhinosaurus Canadiensis: Alberta and Alaska during the Late Cretaceous. The greatest reached 8m long and weighed 4 tons.

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#7

Brachiosaurus: During a long time, this sauropod was believed as being the biggest dinosaur ever known. Late Jurassic in the Colorado River valley. Size: between 19 and 21 meters long, weight: from 28.3 to 58 metric tons. Hindlimb shorter than the forelimbs.

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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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#8

Dacentrurus, a very large stegosaur from late Jurassic/early Cretaceous Europe
10 meters long, weighs 8 tons average, and has very impressive thagomizers (knifelike as opposed to conical for most other stegosaurs)

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#9

A typical depiction of the old vision of sauropods we had: the brontosaurus (or apatosaurus) were too big to move onto the ground. Thus they lived in the water...
Brontosaurus: 20 meters long, 30 tons, Jurassic, North America...

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#10

The diplodocus (Jurassic) were slim animals: 25-30 meters long, 10-12 tons... Now that we have given up the vision of dinosaurs especially sauropods as being sluggish animals, we depict the diplodocids as being swift and above all as being endowed with a whip, a lash, by way of tail. Very usefull to protect itself from predators...

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#11

3 sauropods (brontosaurus ?) walking on the beach, onto the sandy ground... They have a gait similar to the extant elephants, except that their long neck counterbalances their very long tail...

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#12

Other modern depiction of brachiosaurus...





Old depiction of brachiosaurus: the morphology was good, but the vision of the brachiosaurus's metabolism (too heavy for moving on land...) was wrong.



*This image is copyright of its original author
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#13

Pachycephalosaurus (already seen at #5) in its environment...

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#14

Iguanodon: one of the first dinosaurs ever discovered and known (a pub in Brussels was called "Iguanodon"). Named in 1825, From Late Jurassic to early Cretaceous in Europa and North America (both continents were still united), 10 m long, 3,5 tons... The thumb being a rigid and conical spyke could be used as defense. The little finger, elongated and dextrous, could be served to manipulate some objects (? According to wikipedia...).

Modern depiction :



Old depiction: the tail dragged on the ground, the animal walking straight, right as an "i"...

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#15

Idyllic depiction of a mother stégosaurus with her cub... Something is perplexing me. The mother with her lone cub, like the extant mother rhinos or an other solitary mammal herbivore...  But they were reptile, thus the stegosaures layed eggs. Did they keep their eggs ? In this case, they could be with several cubs after the hatching. If not, they abandoned their eggs and how did the cubs grow ? With their mother too ? How did they find back her ?

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