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Grouper fish (Epinephelinae)

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 12-01-2019, 11:52 PM by BorneanTiger )

Groupers are fish of any of a number of genera in the subfamily Epinephelinæ of the family Serranidæ, in the order Perciformes. Not all serranids are called 'groupers'; the family also includes the sea basses. The common name 'grouper' is usually given to fish in one of two large genera: Epinephelus and Mycteroperca. In addition, the species classified in the small genera Anyperidon, Cromileptes, Dermatolepis, Gracila, Saloptia, and Triso are also called 'groupers'. Fish in the genus Plectropomus are referred to as 'coralgroupers'. These genera are all classified in the subfamily Epiphelinæ. However, some of the hamlets (genus Alphestes), the hinds (genus Cephalopholis), the yellow-edged lyretails (genus Variola) and some other small genera (Gonioplectrus, Niphon, Paranthias) are also in this subfamily, and occasional species in other serranid genera have common names involving the word "grouper". Nonetheless, the word "grouper" on its own is usually taken as meaning the subfamily Epinephelinæhttps://books.google.com/books?id=cE_IQgAACAAJ&dq

Unusual sighting of grouper eating a shark:



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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#2

Australians in Queensland have been eating a kind of grouper fish known as the 'rockrod', which wasn't scientifically named until recently. The new scientific name for the rockrod is Epinephelus fuscomarginatus. It inhabits reefs at depths of up to 220 m (721.79 feet), and is found in the central portion of the Great Barrier Reef. The type specimens were found in the Capricorn Channel near Swain Reefs National Park, Queensland: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/scien...84371.htmlhttps://biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view...a.4674.3.2

Credit: Queensland Museum

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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#3
( This post was last modified: 12-01-2019, 11:55 PM by BorneanTiger )

In my area, the GCC, the Brown spotted reef cod (Epinephelus chlorostigma), which besides at least 2 similar-looking or related species is locally known as 'Hamour' or 'Hammour' (and locally managed under the scientific name Epinephelus coioides), is popular: https://www.timeoutabudhabi.com/restaura...ng-hammourhttps://www.thenational.ae/uae/environme...t-1.100390, https://gulfnews.com/uae/education/three...-1.1637759, https://www.aramcoexpats.com/articles/wi...-stand-up/

Daisy Carrington

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Credit: New York University, Abu Dhabi

*This image is copyright of its original author


Credit: Gulf News

*This image is copyright of its original author











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