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Evolution of Whales

smedz Offline
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#1




    

Post any data on the evolution of whales, and we shall answer this one big question scientists still debate about. 

Why did their ancestors go into the water in the first place?
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#2

(04-12-2019, 05:23 AM)smedz Wrote:



    

Post any data on the evolution of whales, and we shall answer this one big question scientists still debate about. 

Why did their ancestors go into the water in the first place?

Great video. Cetaceans have always been among my favourite animals together with bears and birds. Its interesting to see cetaceans like the pakicetus walk on land.
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smedz Offline
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#3




    

Found this great video on whale evolution. Would be really weird to see the whale's ancestors.
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#4

Extant cetaceans are too big to walk on land. Extinct cetaceans like the pakicetus do walk on land.
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Malaysia scilover Offline
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#5

(04-15-2019, 06:43 AM)smedz Wrote:



    

Found this great video on whale evolution. Would be really weird to see the whale's ancestors.
Oh wow, I had no idea whales came from land. It'll be definitely weird seeing the whale's ancestors.
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United States bruin Offline
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#6

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200709113518.htm 
  
15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
Date:
July 9, 2020
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
A report offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. The 15-foot-long dolphin (Ankylorhiza tiedemani comb. n.) lived during the Oligocene -- about 25 million years ago -- and was previously known only from a partial rostrum (snout) fossil.
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