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Clouded Leopard (Neofelis sp.)

United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 07:55 PM by Ngala )

My cuz wants to know some stuff about it so if you have any data to share I would appreciate it, you can also post pics, vids and what not.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Probably an overlooked understudied cat, but found relatively recently. I haven't found much on them with a few simple google searches, but maybe I'm just lazy. I found this at least.

"Ecology and conservation of Formosan clouded leopard, its prey, and other sympatric carnivores in southern Taiwan

*This image is copyright of its original author

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Date
2007-11-14
Author
Chiang, Po-Jen
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During 2000-2004 I studied the population status of the Formosan clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa brachyurus) and the ecology of its prey and other sympatric carnivores in the largest remaining lowland primary forest in southern Taiwan. My research team and I set up 232 hair snare stations and 377 camera trap sites at altitudes of 150-3,092m in the study area. No clouded leopards were photographed in total 13,354 camera trap days. Hair snares did not trap clouded leopard hairs, either. Assessment of the prey base and available habitat indicated that prey depletion and habitat loss, plus historical pelt trade, were likely the major causes of extinction of clouded leopards in Taiwan.
Using zero-inflated count models to analyze distribution and occurrence patterns of Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis) and 4 ungulates, we found habitat segregation among these 5 herbivore species. Formosan macaques, Reeveâ s muntjacs (Muntiacus reevesi micrurus), and Formosan serows (Nemorhaedus swinhoei) likely were the most important prey species of Formosan clouded leopards given their body size and high occurrence rates in lower altitudes. In contrast, sambar deer (Cervus unicolor swinhoii) tended to occur more frequently as altitude increased. Formosan macaques exhibited seasonal differences in occurrence rates and were absent at altitudes > 2,500m in winter. Only Formosan serows showed preference for cliffs and rugged terrain, while the other 4 species, except wild boars (Sus scrofa taivanus), avoided these areas. Habitat segregation in forest understory and structure were more pronounced among the 4 ungulates. Forest structure rarely affected occurrence rates of Formosan macaques on the ground.
Niche relationships of the other sympatric carnivores were studied through habitat, diet, and temporal dimensions. Resource partitioning by carnivores was observed. Altitude was the strongest factor explaining the composition of the carnivore community in the local study-area scale and in the landscape scale across Taiwan. Carnivores could be divided into 2 groups: low-mid altitude consisting of Formosan ferret badgers (Melogale moschata subaurantiaca), gem-faced palm civets (Paguma larvata taivana), lesser oriental civets (Viverricula indica taivana), crab-eating mongooses (Herpestes urva formosanus), leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis chinensis), and feral cats (Felis catus), and the mid-high altitude group consisting of yellow-throated martens (Martes flavigula chrysospila), Siberian weasels (Mustela sibirica taivana), and Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus formosanus). Carnivore richness was higher at mid altitudes where these 2 groups overlapped (i.e. mid-domain effect). The low-mid altitude carnivores were more nocturnal and tolerant of human activity and forest alteration except crab-eating mongooses, which were diurnal and avoided human encroachment. Similar to crab-eating mongooses, the mid-high altitude carnivores also avoided human encroachment and were diurnal except for Siberian weasels, which were more nocturnal. Diet summary based on their major food items for all sympatric carnivores revealed 3 groups of foragers which foraged on: invertebrates, small mammals, and plant fruits. Felidae, yellow-throated martens, and Siberian weasels preyed on small mammals. Asiatic black bears and gem-faced palm civets ate mostly plant fruits. The other 3 carnivores were mainly invertebrate foragers. These 9 carnivores partitioned resource uses in the 3 niche dimensions except for some overlap in resource use by leopard cats and feral cats.
Prey base for Formosan clouded leopards and the carnivore richness in Taiwan were found to be lower in areas with higher levels of human activity. On the other hand, Formosan macaques and ungulates could become over-abundant without human hunting and top carnivore predation. Mesopredator release may occur because of vanishing top carnivores, causing reduction of the lower trophic level prey species. It is important to assess the cascading impacts of the loss of the Formosan clouded leopards and Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra chinensis) and the declining Asiatic black bears and to consider reintroduction of Formosan clouded leopards, as well as active management of the other larger mammals. These results provided baseline information for reintroduction of clouded leopards and management of their prey and generated new hypotheses regarding the ecology of these large mammals for future investigation.
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http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29674
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"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#2
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 07:56 PM by Ngala )

PAGE 247

https://archive.org/stream/PocockMammali...5/mode/2up
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#3
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 07:57 PM by Ngala )

Size of the Clouded leopard:

Some time ago, I made a table that summarize all the data that I could found at 2012, about the size of the mainland clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa). Here is the table:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Sadly, flesh measurements are very rare, so I included skin measurements too, but they are clearly distinguishable in the table, to avoid confusion.

Sunquist and Sunquist (2002) presents the first table, but I checked all they sources (except two) and I included only those which came from real measurements (in the skin or in the flesh) and not those from simple ranges with no explanation. The only two sources that I could not found are those from Malaysia (1 female) and China (2 un-sexed specimens). I include the table here for reference (read square):


*This image is copyright of its original author


These two tables exhaust all the information about the mainland clouded leopard that I could found.


Latter, I found new weights in a new document from Hearn et al. (2013, attached document) about the Sunda clouded leopard (Neofelis diardi), which suggest that the island species is somewhat larger.

Here is the table, check that all the specimens from Thailand are already included in my table above:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Latter, I also found this beautiful male that weighed 25 kg, the heaviest in record. Here is the link for the article, check the pictures please:
https://www.wildcatconservation.org/firs...-collared/


Here is also a male of 24 kg captured in 2014, check the picture:
"Introducing Raja, the third male clouded leopard collared in the Kinabatangan by DGFC, Sabah Wildlife Department and WildCRU. Raja, a beautiful 24-kg adult male, was caught and collared on 22 March 2014, as part of our project funded by Sime Darby Foundation, the Robertson Foundation, The Clouded Leopard Project and others. The whole collaring operation was supervised by wildlife veterinarian, Dr Laura Benedict, from Wildlife Rescue Unit, and Andrew Hearn, PhD student at Oxford University. "
Link: https://www.facebook.com/147476775319983...331824489/

Here is another female of 9.9 kg captured in 2014, check the link:
"Andrew Hearn from WildCRU and PhD student at Oxford University, said a female Sunda clouded leopard weighing 9.9 kg was caught in one of the traps set up along the Kinabatangan River, in the vicinity of DGFC on Aug 15."
Link: http://www.bernama.com/bernama/state_new...17&cat=sbe

So three adult males from the Sunda are known, of 23.3 kg, 24 kg and 25 kg respectively (Average of 24.1 kg); also there is one adult female of 16.8 kg and two sub-adults of the same sex of 9.9 kg and 12 kg respectively.

This is the data that I have, for the moment, feel free to add more about these two species of clouded leopards.

Attached Files
.pdf   Hearn et al-2013_Ecology of Sunda clouded leopard.pdf (Size: 146.54 KB / Downloads: 10)
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Canada Dr Panthera Offline
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#4

Thank you Guate, it is safe to say that Sunda clouded leopards are a bit larger than the mainland ones ( different species) and the Borneo ones are larger than the Sumatra ones ( top predator in Borneo, competes with tigers in Sumatra).
These two species remain the least studied and least known of all big cats ( since they are not that big anyway, large Lynx may surpass them at times)
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#5

@GuateGojira Great info! My cousin claimed they got up to 50kg which I knew was wrong just common sense wise, but now he can see the full data. Maybe he went to one of the main sources like Nat geo Wild, the "900lb siberian tiger average" seems to have spread to other cats.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#6
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 07:57 PM by Ngala Edit Reason: Fixed the video link )

Such rare footage!



"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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India sanjay Offline
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#7
( This post was last modified: 12-11-2015, 04:01 PM by sanjay )

@SVTIGRIS , When you insert video through editor (by clicking on icon), First remove the pre-existing "http://" text from the textbox under the "Video URL:" and then paste the actual link
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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(12-11-2015, 04:00 PM)sanjay Wrote: @SVTIGRIS , When you insert video through editor (by clicking on icon), First remove the pre-existing "http://" text from the textbox under the "Video URL:" and then paste the actual link


Oh ok, thank you
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#9
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 07:59 PM by Ngala )

http://www.cougarnet.org/sites/original/...louded.pdf
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#10
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 08:00 PM by Ngala )

Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia

Neofelis diardi borneensis

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

All photo and information credits: Alain Compost / WWF-Canon

Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Kalimantan (Borneo), Malaysia

Neofelis diardi borneensis

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

All photo and information credits: Sebastien Kennerknecht - Nature & Conservation Photography
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#11

Regarding the clouded leopards, arent there two species?
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Italy Ngala Offline
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(05-01-2016, 10:45 PM)SVTIGRIS Wrote: Regarding the clouded leopards, arent there two species?

Yes, there are two different species. Previously considered Neofelis nebulosa, they are split into two species, N. nebulosa and N. diardi (this last one subsequently distinguished in two ssp., N. d. diardi and N. d. borneensis).
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#13
( This post was last modified: 05-02-2016, 02:11 AM by Sully )

@Ngala sorry, my younger cousin asked that when I was gone
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#14
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 08:00 PM by Ngala )

The Clouded leopard skull in comparison to the Polar bear skull.

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Italy Ngala Offline
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#15
( This post was last modified: 09-28-2017, 08:01 PM by Ngala )

Neofelis diardi borneensis

Photo and information credits: Chien Lee Wildlife Photography
"Just retrieved one of my dslr camera traps which has been running in Danum Valley Conservation Area (Sabah, northern Borneo) for the past month, and was excited to find this beautiful male Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi) still patrolling the same trail I photographed him at two years ago. This truly is the lord of the Borneo rainforest."

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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