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Carnivorous dinosaurs other than the famous t-rex and spinosaurus..

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#1

I inaugurate a new topic about the numerous carnivorous dinosaurs other than the famous T-rex and Spinosaurus.

Rather friendly, isn't ? Coeluosaurus yes, but what else ? Raptor, deinonychosauridae ( perhaps, but the hindlegs are missing... )... ? If they are extracted from the Jurassik Park movies, there are deinonychus.

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#2

Carnotaurus ? A theropoda dinosaur in any case... With the extant graphical techniques, the diversity of the artistic depictions seems to be without limit.

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#3

Here, because of the big claw on each foot, I affirm it's a deinonychus !

Deinonychus... It is known since the end of the sixties. This dinosaur fascinates me very much. The felids have invented the retractable claw. The deinonychus inaugurated the "folding claw" (I don't find a better word). In both cases in order to preserve them intact.


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#4

A diplophosaurus, a carnivorous dinosaur of the early Jurassic period. Dimensions : till 6 meters long, 500 kilograms. Their teeth don't allow to affirm that it enjoyed a strong bite force. Thus, perhaps it was a scavenger.

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#5

I am a little bit perplexed in front of this draw. Because of the small arms, it would be a tyrannosauridae. But because of the rectilinear jaw, we can tell that this dinosaur doesn' t enjoy a powerful bite force. Thus it isn't a tyrannosauridae. But the representation is nice...

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#6

Acrocanthosaurus: big-sized theropoda, 11,50 meters long, weighs till 7,2 tons. It roamed in North America (Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming...) during the early Cretaceous. Quite bipedal predator best known with its high neural spines. Certainly the Apex predator of its ecosystem which preyed on ornithopods, sauropods and ankylosaurs.


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#7

Abertosaurus: theropoda tyrannosauridae of the Late Cretaceous (70 millions years ago). Nine to ten meters long, 2 tons. Remains from Alberta, hence its name. Might hunt in pack. Like other tyrannosauridae, it enjoyed a powerful bite force: 42.000 newtons (approximately 4,3 tons).

Two albertosaurus against a deinosuchus on the ground:

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#8

Albertosaurus hunted probably ceratopsids.

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#9

During the late cretaceous, the tyrannosauridae dominated the nothern hemisphere whereas the abelosauridae dominated the southern hemisphere. Among them the Majungasaurus, perhaps the most hideous predator of all time, in Madagascar. 8 meters long, 3 meters high, 1 ton.




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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#10

Cryolophosaurus: big theropoda abelisauridae from the Early Jurassic of Antartica. 6m50 long, 465 kilograms. But the only one known specimen was a subadult. Thus we can think they were larger in size and weight. This animal is famous too for its "Pompadour" crest (term from Wikipedia) over its head. One think it was used for the intra-specie recognition...


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#11

Coelophysis: famous dinosaur of the late triasic period and Early Jurassic (216-196 millions years), from the southern part of the United States to the Zimbabwe and South Africa. Small and slendery-built dinosaur, growing up to 3 meters long and weighing 20 kilos. Narrow head measuring 270 mm long with a stereocospic vision giving it an excellent depth perception.

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#12

Allosaurus: perhaps the most famous theropoda, carnivorous dinosaurs, of the Late Jurassic. Reaching from 9 to 12 meters long and weighing 2 - 2.5 tons. But weight estimations are very debattable. It could have roamed in North America to Portugal  and Tanzania. Could hunt in pack large sauropods like antrodemus, other name for the famous brontosaurus. Its bite force wasn't very impressive, but the skull could withstand 55.000 Newtons of vertical force against the tooth row, sugggesting allosaurus could used his skull like a machete against its preys: sauopods, ornithopods and stegosaurids.

Reconstitution from the famous BBC serie "Walking with dinosaurs":

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#13

I believe that the word dinosaurs mean "huge lizards" because the first thing that amazed their first discoverers was their huge size. I like this picture a lot, because dinosaurs too could be incredibly small. I Imagine this small dinosaur specimen with a very good sense of vision. With a beak it could crunch any insect it met on its path, thus a predator...

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#14

Irritator and some suchomimus fishing... Both are spinosaurid dinosaurs. Irritator reached 8 meters long, 3 meters height and 2 tons weight. Lived during the Early Cretaceous (110 million years) in Brasil. Suchomimus: 11 meters long, weight between 2,5 and 5,2 tons, found inside tenéré desert. Thus perhaps this drawing isn't real...
Question: were the different spinosaurids social enough for having fished so together ? A little bit like the extant bears in Siberia and Alaska ?

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#15

Surely a tyrannosaurid, because big head, powerful jaws, front leg very small. But what can i add any more ?

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