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Carcharodontosaurus saharicus

Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 08-28-2020, 04:44 PM by DinoFan83 )

Carcharodontosaurus is a genus of carnivorous carcharodontosaurid dinosaur that existed during the Cenomanian stage of the mid-Cretaceous period. It is currently known to have been among the largest theropods, larger than Tyrannosaurus and comparable to Giganotosaurus and Spinosaurus.
The genus Carcharodontosaurus is named after the shark genus Carcharodon. itself composed of the Greek karchar[os] ( meaning "jagged" or "sharp") and odōn (ὀδών, "teeth"), and the suffix -saurus ("lizard"). Carcharodontosaurus includes some of the longest and heaviest known carnivorous dinosaurs, with various scientists proposing length estimates for the species. Based on relatives such as Giganotosaurus, Carcharodontosaurus would have been roughly 13-13.5 meters long (42.7 to 44.3 feet) and would have weighed 9-9.8 tonnes (9.9-10.8 short tons).
Carcharodontosaurus were carnivores, with enormous jaws and long, serrated teeth up to eight inches long. A skull length of about 1.62 meters (5.2 ft) has been restored for C. saharicus. In 2001, Hans C. E. Larsson published a description of the inner ear and endocranium of Carcharodontosaurus saharicus. Starting from the portion of the brain closest to the tip of the animal's snout is the forebrain, which is followed by the midbrain. The midbrain is angled downwards at a 45-degree angle and towards the rear of the animal. This is followed by the hindbrain, which is roughly parallel to the forebrain and forms a roughly 40-degree angle with the midbrain. Overall, the brain of C. saharicus[/i] would have been similar to that of a related dinosaur, Allosaurus fragilis. Larsson found that the ratio of the cerebrum to the volume of the brain overall in Carcharodontosaurus was typical for a non-avian reptile. Carcharodontosaurus also had a large optic nerve.
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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-23-2020, 12:27 AM by DinoFan83 )

Carcharodontosaurus by Daitengu on DeviantArt

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Carcharodontosaurus by Dmitry Bogdanov

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Carcharodontosaurus by Fred Wierum

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Carcharodontosaurus by SpinoInWonderland (9+ tonnes)

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Carcharodontosaurus by GetAwayTrike (13.4 meters TL, >9.4 tonnes)

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Carcharodontosaurus based on Giganotosaurus femur scaling by Oktayanhu (ignore the given weights, however; SGM-DIN 1 would have been >9 tonnes at this length)

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Carcharodontosaurus based on skull scaling from Giganotosaurus done by Spinodontosaur4
(However, note that this uses the somewhat underestimated Scott Hartman Giganotosaurus, and using the likely better Giganotosaurus by GetAwayTrike would yield a 9.05 tonne animal)

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Carcharodontosaurus skull by Theropod1

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Carcharodontosaurus skulls by SpinoInWonderland (SGM-DIN 1 is >160 cm here)

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Carcharodontosaurus skull from Sereno et al. 1996 (>160 cm)

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Mounted Carcharodontosaurus skull by Travis on Flickr

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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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Carcharodontosaurus (SGM-DIN 1, 9+ tonnes) and Purussaurus (UFAC 1403, 6.2 tonnes). Skeletals by SpinoInWonderland and Randomdinos.

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Spinosaurus (NMC 41852, 11.7+ tonnes) and Carcharodontosaurus (SGM-DIN 1, 9+ tonnes). Skeletals by SpinoInWonderland.

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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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Carcharodontosaurus tooth by Gyik Toma

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Carcharodontosaurus by EmperorDinoBot

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Carcharodontosaurus from Planet Dinosaur

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Carcharodontosaurus from Dinosaur Planet

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" Carcharodontosaurus saharicus vs Human skull comparison ?

Via University of Chicago
Carcharodontosaurus is a genus of carnivorous carcharodontosaurid dinosaurs that existed during the Cenomanian stage of the mid-Cretaceous Period. It is currently known to include two species: C. saharicus and C. iguidensis, which were among the larger theropods, nearly as large as or even larger than Tyrannosaurus, Giganotosaurus and Spinosaurus.
Length: 8 – 14 m
Mass: 6,000 – 15,000 kg
Lived: 145 million years ago - 72.1 million years ago (Berriasian - Campanian) "


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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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( This post was last modified: Yesterday, 05:26 AM by DinoFan83 )

Here are some scalings I have done for Carcharodontosaurus size, based on Giganotosaurus as well as assuming proportions intermediate to Acrocanthosaurus and giganotosaurines. I've deleted the old post on the matter and redid these from the ground up.

Femur scaling from Giganotosaurus:

According to Carrano et al. 2012, the femur of MUCPv-Ch1 is 136 cm long, compared to 126 for IPHG 1922. As for the size of the Giganotosaurus being used as a base, I'll quote myself from elsewhere:

Quote:On his website, Paul estimates the Giganotosaurus holotype at 6.85 tonnes. However, there are 2 issues with his skeletal likely underscoring the mass: 
-He has used a specific gravity of 0.85 when it should have been about 0.915 following Hartman's 2013 GDI analysis.
-In his skeletal, the preserved scapula is taken as complete when it isn't (the same issue that plagues Hartman's skeletal), thus making the chest much shallower than it would be. The correction factor, following both SpinoInWonderland's GDI of GetAwayTrike's Giganotosaurus as well as the GDI of his own skeletal, is 6.8 to 7.53 tonnes.
Correcting both of these, Greg Paul's skeletal of Giganotosaurus goes to 8.17 tonnes for MUCPv-Ch1.

This would result in a mass of about 6.5 tonnes for IPHG 1922. As for how to scale up to SGM-DIN 1, there are numerous plausible discrepancies between the holotype and the neotype, and they are as follows:

-Franoys' best estimate: 12.5% larger linearly.
-SpinoInWonderland's best estimate: 19.2% larger linearly
-Theropod1's best estimate: 20% larger linearly
-Thedinorocker's best estimate: 26% larger linearly.

For this particular restoration, SpinoInWonderland's best fit (and therefore all the larger ones) get >11 tonnes for SGM-DIN 1 which is very likely too much, therefore I'll use the 12.5% discrepancy, which would result in a mass of about 9.25 tonnes for SGM-DIN 1. SpinoInWonderland has been able to get similar results to these using his Giganotosaurus skeletal. To quote him:

Quote:I get about ~5.79 tonnes for IPHG 1922 X 46 if scaled based on my unreleased GDI for the old version of my Giganotosaurus skeletal (around ~7.4 tonnes, the deeper chest did quite a bit). Scaling this result up to SGM-Din 1 gives around ~9.8 tonnes (using my best-fit scaling factor).

So judging by this, SGM-DIN 1 is in the region of 9.25-9.8 tonnes if scaled from Giganotosaurus.

Skull scaling (intermediate between Acrocanthosaurus and giganotosaurines):

Another plausible restoration for Carcharodontosaurus would be to assume its overall skull size to body size ratio was intermediate between that of Acrocanthosaurus and that of giganotosaurines, because as discussed here, it is phylogenetically intermediate between them and the same may very well apply to its proportions. The giganotosaurine I will be using as reference here is Mapusaurus as it preserves by far the most complete cranial material of any giganotosaurine.
As for the mass proportional to skull size, the largest specimen for Mapusaurus would have likely had a 180 cm skull and weighed about 10.87 tonnes, compared to the largest specimen for Acrocanthosaurus which would have had a skull 130 cm long (Currie and Carpenter 2000) and weighed 4.74 tonnes (Greg Paul, with the density corrected from 0.85 to 0.915) to 6,177 kilograms (Bates et al 2009), with a mean estimate of about 5.46 tonnes.
Averaging these out means that a carcharodontosaur with a 130 cm skull and proportions intermediate between the 2 would have weighed some 4.78 tonnes. Scaling up to SpinoInWonderland's skull reconstruction (161 cm), this gets 9.1 tonnes, and is about 9.44 tonnes based on Theropod1's skull reconstruction (163 cm).
All in all, although SGM-DIN 1's skull could be larger than these restorations, it looks as though based on them SGM-DIN 1 is about 9.1-9.44 tonnes.

1 more thing to note:
-The only major difference between Franoys' and SpinoInWonderland's skeletals is the size difference they got between the holotype and the neotype - aside from that, they both used Tyrannotitan and Giganotosaurus as the primary basis.
Heck, if you used Franoys' skeletal but used thedinorocker's best fit between the holotype and neotype, you'd get 13.44 meters and 9.1 tonnes for SGM-DIN 1.
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