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Carcharodontosaurus saharicus

Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-22-2020, 03:42 PM by DinoFan83 )

Carcharodontosaurus is a genus of carnivorous carcharodontosaurid dinosaur that existed during the Cenomanian stage of the mid-Cretaceous period. It is currently known to have been among the largest theropods, larger than Tyrannosaurus and comparable to Giganotosaurus and Spinosaurus.
The genus Carcharodontosaurus is named after the shark genus Carcharodon. itself composed of the Greek karchar[os] ( meaning "jagged" or "sharp") and odōn (ὀδών, "teeth"), and the suffix -saurus ("lizard"). Carcharodontosaurus includes some of the longest and heaviest known carnivorous dinosaurs, with various scientists proposing length estimates for the species. Based on relatives such as Giganotosaurus, Carcharodontosaurus would have been roughly 13-13.5 meters long (42.7 to 44.3 feet) and weighed at least 9 tonnes (9.9 short tons).
Carcharodontosaurus were carnivores, with enormous jaws and long, serrated teeth up to eight inches long. A skull length of about 1.62 meters (5.2 ft) has been restored for C. saharicus. In 2001, Hans C. E. Larsson published a description of the inner ear and endocranium of Carcharodontosaurus saharicus. Starting from the portion of the brain closest to the tip of the animal's snout is the forebrain, which is followed by the midbrain. The midbrain is angled downwards at a 45-degree angle and towards the rear of the animal. This is followed by the hindbrain, which is roughly parallel to the forebrain and forms a roughly 40-degree angle with the midbrain. Overall, the brain of C. saharicus would have been similar to that of a related dinosaur, Allosaurus fragilis. Larsson found that the ratio of the cerebrum to the volume of the brain overall in Carcharodontosaurus was typical for a non-avian reptile. Carcharodontosaurus also had a large optic nerve.
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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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Carcharodontosaurus by Daitengu on DeviantArt

*This image is copyright of its original author



Carcharodontosaurus by SpinoInWonderland

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Carcharodontosaurus by GetAwayTrike (13.4 meters TL)

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Carcharodontosaurus based on Giganotosaurus femur scaling by Oktayanhu (ignore the given weights, however; SGM-DIN 1 would have been >9 tonnes at this length)

*This image is copyright of its original author


Carcharodontosaurus based on skull scaling from Giganotosaurus done by Spinodontosaur4
(However, note that this uses the somewhat underestimated Scott Hartman Giganotosaurus, and using the likely better Giganotosaurus by GetAwayTrike would yield a 9.05 tonne animal)

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Carcharodontosaurus skull by Theropod1

*This image is copyright of its original author
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