There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---
Read the experience of Rishi who recently traveled to forest of Dooars (Bengal, India). Click Here

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Cannibalism In Rhesus Macaque

India sanjay Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
*****
#1
( This post was last modified: 06-03-2014, 12:25 AM by sanjay )

Rhesus Macaques are cannibalism ? This question Arises When An Indian Photographer Saw This

*This image is copyright of its original author


Image Courtesy: Indianaturewatch, Photographer: Lele Gaurav

According to him:
Quote:Throughout a safari at Pench a week ago, I saw something i thought uncommon. In a group war between adversary rhesus macaque aggregates the triumphant gathering appeared to have held a harmed macaque hostage. On first look without binoculars we thought the macaques are ripping apart the dead macaque. Do they rip apart ? At the same time on more intensive look we perceived that the macaque wasn't dead. It appeared to be superbly depleted or bluffing dead. At whatever point it used to get up and make a run the alpha male and his cronies would seize him and begin gnawing. This happened for around 10-15 mins for around 200 meters. A few macaques appeared to be outright curious in the harmed fellow though others appeared to be exceptionally rough. Indeed a few langurs around were intrigued and keeping a watch on macaques. What was behind this apparently merciless conduct ? The macaques weren't expecting to murder or consume the harmed individual simply appeared to continue harming him. He must have succumbed to his damages in a matter of seconds
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#2
( This post was last modified: 06-26-2014, 09:11 AM by sanjay )

Most apes or Monkeys will eat rival members in troup fights. Canabilism is seen in many animals, so its definitely more common than not.

Chimps are notorious for this, they are also shown "sharing pieces of the carcas" of rival chimps.

Here is a graffic video of a Chimp from the same clan as its own attackers



Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#3
( This post was last modified: 06-26-2014, 09:12 AM by sanjay )

Chimp Cannibalism



1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB