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Brown Bears (Info, Pics and Videos)

United States Pckts Offline
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#16


*This image is copyright of its original author

Scavenged only for Adult Bison and no sex specified for Adult moose. Except for Adult male moose of 0.01
Which is not observed but "expected"
"electivity is based on observed frequency of use with that expected by number of live animals in grizzly bear range"

Use of ungulates by Yellowstone grizzly bears Ursus arctos (Mattson)


Brief extracts:

Elk and Moose

Among the ungulates, elk were by far the most important prey. This was basically a density-depen­dent relationship, since elk outnumbered all other ungulates combined. Elk were most vulnerable at three periods during the annual life cycle: the rut­ting season, the end of winter, and at calving.


During and after the rutting season, bull elk are more vulnerable to grizzly bear attacks than at other times when grizzlies may selectively hunt them. Bulls become vulnerable in fall because of their habit of bugling, their strong rutting scent, and their preoc­cupation with mating and holding a harem. Many also receive incapacitating wounds in combat with other contending males. Any of these situations may trigger predatory behavior in the bear, which then uses the combination of skills most appropriate to the specific opportunity.



Anecdotal accounts from field observers illus­trate how grizzly bears capture elk during these periods and how they behave at their kills. In addition to having great power and speed, grizzlies are known to stalk with great skill and work coop­eratively to pursue and kill large prey. As "loners," they kill and defend.



Some grizzlies develop specific hunting strate­gies. Number 88 (Patch-eye), alpha male at the Trout Creek ecocenter in 1967, moved to the Firehole-Madison River drainage after the closure of Trout Creek in 1970. We observed him on three elk kills during the spring of 1971. Two of the three elk (both bulls) appeared to have been stalked and captured with a simple hunting strategy. Both carcasses were found in heavy timber less than 45 meters (50 yards) from the banks of the Madison River. We found drag-trails where the grizzly had hauled the elk from the river. These observations suggested that Patch-eye, from concealment in the timber, attacked the elk wading the river, his superior strength enabling him to overpower them in the water. Bone marrow compression tests showed that neither elk was malnourished at the time of death. In the same area, we observed an adult female grizzly on a fresh elk kill in the middle of the river. We believed the fe­male used a similar hunting strategy.



Even in thermal areas such as the geyser basins, spring snow was often 0.5 to 1 meter (2-3 ft) deep in the timber. Winter-weakened elk were able to travel more easily in the river or along its banks than in the deep, wet snow of adjacent timber. Thus, kills tended to be concentrated in riparian habitat.


Bear 208, a 12.5 year old female without cubs, was observed for 33 days in which she preyed on 4 adult moose, 1 adult caribou, 9 moose calves, and 1 small mammal or unidentified species.
Estimated mass: 91 kg
Length over curves: 180.3 cm
Shoulder height: 107.6 cm
Neck circumference: 59.1 cm
Girth: 106.0 cm
Body length: 104.1 cm
Head width: 22.2 cm
Head length: 35.2 cm
Length upper left canine: 21.0 mm
Width upper left canine: 15.2 mm
Length lower left canine: 20.8 mm
Width lower left canine: 14.0 mm

Bear 205, a 4.5 year old male observed for 29 days, in which he preyed on 6 adult moose and 3 moose calves.
Estimated mass: 205 kg
Length over curves: 229.2 cm
Shoulder height: 128.6 cm
Neck circumference: 77.2 cm
Girth: 124.1 cm
Body length: 111.8 cm
Head width: 21.6 cm
Head length: 38.7 cm
Length upper left canine: 22.0 mm
Width upper left canine: 16.0 mm
Length lower left canine: 23.0 mm
Width lower left canine: 16.0 mm



I have little doubt that they prey on Female Moose, but I still think a bull will be too much for them. Or just not worth the risk, I think that there is no point in even risking on a bull bison. Unless the bear is desperate.
Nice info though, tfs





 
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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#17

@Pckts
I can agree with you there,but I do think a big male grizzly could take down a bull moose, I think their extreme strength would make it possible to take down a bull moose, But I don`t either think they take the big risk of taking them down, they could easily get hurt by a bull moose. And they always seem to prefer yearlings, thats more than enough food for one bear, no matter what size. Even if it were deperate and tried his luck on a bull bison, I don`t think they would succeed, Bison are just too big, and the grizzlies lack of predatory claws makes it even more difficult to take down a bull bison. And on top of all, I don`t think they have the speed and agility which is required to take down a bull bison. Strength just isen`t enough in that fight!

Btw thanks for sharing all the info :-)
 
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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#18

Two Brown Bears having a brawl!






 

 
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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#19

This Really shows the imense strength of Brown Bears!
 



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India brotherbear Offline
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#20

No grizzly, not even a huge male, is going to purposely choose a bull moose or a bull bison as potential prey. However, I do believe that before the invention of the breech-load rifle in 1848, when the bison and the grizzly were both more than numerous in the American west, those grizzlies hunted bison and range cattle; Texas longhorns left by the Spanish explorers which roamed the prairie as feral cattle. Evidence and tales told would suggest that those bears were bigger than the inland grizzlis now living in remote locations. I have no doubt that even those would choose a calf or a weak member of the herd; but a bull bison might decide to initiate a battle royal.
 
~The Grizzly Book by Jack Samson - page 241 - The Big Skull by Grancel Fitz.
 In the case of bears, it wasn't hard to find. The world's record grizzly skull is in the National Museum in Washington. The measurements of skulls give us the only accurate basis for comparison, and it is worth noting that this one was inaccurately reported for the last edition of the records. When the figures were found to vary from those on the same bear in earlier editions, the Washington authorities made a careful recheck. The length of that skull is 16 inches. The width is 9 and nine sixteenths. Combining these gives the record "score" of 25 and nine sixteenths. But far more important is the fact that this bear was shot near the Missouri River in Montana, away back in 1890, and it is highly significant that E.S. Cameron bagged him as early as the 4th of April. Since bears live for 40 years or more, unless somebody shoots them, and since they keep on getting bigger until they die, it is a fairly safe bet that this old monster was born in the great days of the bison, at least a century ago.With the passing of the bison and the settling of the plains, all this was changed. Those huge old buffalo-eaters turned to killing cattle, and were wiped out by the ranchers. The grizzlies that survived were in the high mountain country, where the heavy snows and lack of winter feed forced them to hibernate for as much as six or seven months of the year. If a bear can eat only half of his life, and has to sleep throughout the rest, it just doesn't make sense that he can ever grow as big as one who is out and eating well for nine months, and hibernates for only three.
 
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India brotherbear Offline
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#21

~The record short-faced bear skull, from the biggest Arctodus simus specimen ever discovered, measures 20.51 inches. The record brown bear skull, that of a Kodiak, measures 19 and thirteen sixteeths inches long. The length difference is less than one inch.
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India sanjay Offline
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#22

Got this interesting Image from Internet. Brown bear is chased by wolf

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#23
( This post was last modified: 03-18-2015, 07:22 PM by peter )

Warsaw, posting at the Shaggy God Forum and Carnivora, is very interested in bears and often succeeds in finding remarkable pictures. 

In some parts of the United States, Canada and Alaska, hunting definitely is not a thing of the past. Those interested in brown bears prefer Alaska, where males often exceed 1000 pounds. Every now and then, a photograph of a slain giant is posted somewhere. Although it is a pity to see a large male brown bear killed for no reason, it also is remarkable to see animals with a prehistoric size still exist in our day. I assume it's clear that hunting large male bears for a long period of time will affect the average size of a population sooner or later.          

This bear was shot at Unimag Island:  


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Wanderfalke Offline
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#24

If someone would kill somebody and pose with a laugh next to his victim for a photo, people would call this person sick. But everything´s fine, if you do it with non-human animals. In fact, a lot of people think it´s impressive. We´re a disgrace in every respect.
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United States Roflcopters Offline
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#25

what an enormous bear! Sad to see how his life ended.. 
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United States Pckts Offline
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#26

I don't know if you watch "wild alaska" but its based off of hunting Kodiak bear.
The Hunter guides who are the antagonists on the show are hired to track the bear then the hunter gets to kill it. The object is to find the largest bear you can, for obvious reasons. They "stumble" across a whale carcass with a lone bear on it. This bear had run off all other bears and he was sleeping on the carcass. These hunters then treked to the highest point and shot this unsuspecting bear. It was disgusting, but any way, the bear was so large they had to drag it back to camp on the side of their boat before it got dark and they would of had to just leave it there. Either way, its very sad to see this still happeneing.
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India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
#27

This ( above post by Pckts ) is why I seldom watch what used to be very nice nature tv programs. It appears to me some somewhere along the way, new management has put such tv channels as Animal Planet and even Nat Geo Wild often  in the wrong direction. It's all about ratings now with wildlife conservation on the back burner.  
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Wanderfalke Offline
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#28

(03-19-2015, 01:06 AM)'Pckts' Wrote: I don't know if you watch "wild alaska" but its based off of hunting Kodiak bear.
The Hunter guides who are the antagonists on the show are hired to track the bear then the hunter gets to kill it. The object is to find the largest bear you can, for obvious reasons. They "stumble" across a whale carcass with a lone bear on it. This bear had run off all other bears and he was sleeping on the carcass. These hunters then treked to the highest point and shot this unsuspecting bear. It was disgusting, but any way, the bear was so large they had to drag it back to camp on the side of their boat before it got dark and they would of had to just leave it there. Either way, its very sad to see this still happeneing.

 

Such people are simply prisoners of their own obsolete and misguiding tradition. I said it several times and I will say it again and again. Most people stop to use their brain when it comes to tradition. Injustice doesn´t get legitimated just because it has tradition. PERIOD.  

 
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United States Pckts Offline
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#29

(03-19-2015, 03:18 AM)'Wanderfalke' Wrote:
(03-19-2015, 01:06 AM)'Pckts' Wrote: I don't know if you watch "wild alaska" but its based off of hunting Kodiak bear.
The Hunter guides who are the antagonists on the show are hired to track the bear then the hunter gets to kill it. The object is to find the largest bear you can, for obvious reasons. They "stumble" across a whale carcass with a lone bear on it. This bear had run off all other bears and he was sleeping on the carcass. These hunters then treked to the highest point and shot this unsuspecting bear. It was disgusting, but any way, the bear was so large they had to drag it back to camp on the side of their boat before it got dark and they would of had to just leave it there. Either way, its very sad to see this still happeneing.


 

Such people are simply prisoners of their own obsolete and misguiding tradition. I said it several times and I will say it again and again. Most people stop to use their brain when it comes to tradition. Injustice doesn´t get legitimated just because it has tradition. PERIOD.  

 

 



The worst thing about it is they try to say they are "controlling population"
and I just wince. How in the world is denying a huge and healthy bear the chance to pass his genes on, good for them?

Such a joke!
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Wanderfalke Offline
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#30

(03-21-2015, 03:13 AM)'Pckts' Wrote:
(03-19-2015, 03:18 AM)'Wanderfalke' Wrote:
(03-19-2015, 01:06 AM)'Pckts' Wrote: I don't know if you watch "wild alaska" but its based off of hunting Kodiak bear.
The Hunter guides who are the antagonists on the show are hired to track the bear then the hunter gets to kill it. The object is to find the largest bear you can, for obvious reasons. They "stumble" across a whale carcass with a lone bear on it. This bear had run off all other bears and he was sleeping on the carcass. These hunters then treked to the highest point and shot this unsuspecting bear. It was disgusting, but any way, the bear was so large they had to drag it back to camp on the side of their boat before it got dark and they would of had to just leave it there. Either way, its very sad to see this still happeneing.



 

Such people are simply prisoners of their own obsolete and misguiding tradition. I said it several times and I will say it again and again. Most people stop to use their brain when it comes to tradition. Injustice doesn´t get legitimated just because it has tradition. PERIOD.  

 


 



The worst thing about it is they try to say they are "controlling population"
and I just wince. How in the world is denying a huge and healthy bear the chance to pass his genes on, good for them?

Such a joke!

 

Totally agree. Beyond good and evil

 
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