There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Baleen whales (Mysticeti)

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
#1
( This post was last modified: 02-03-2020, 04:41 PM by BorneanTiger )

Baleen whales, formerly known as whalebone whales, are cetaceans classified under the parvorder Mysticeti, and consist of 4 extant families: Right whales (Balaenidæ), Rorquals (Balaenopteridæ), Pygmya right whales (Cetotheriid[i]æ[/i]), and gray whales (Eschrichtiidæ). Balænids are distinguished by their enlarged head and thick blubber, while rorquals and gray whales generally have a flat head, long throat pleats, and are more streamlined than Balænids. Rorquals also tend to be longer than the latter: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/~biology/fish/pu...jmorph.pdf, https://web.archive.org/web/201603050705...jmorph.pdf, http://animaldiversity.org/site/accounts...ialis.html https://web.archive.org/web/201603050705...jmorph.pdf, https://books.google.com/books?hl=ar&id=...e&q=baleen

Diagrams by Woodward et al.
   
   
   

2 species of rorquals: humpback (Megaptera novæangliæ) and blue whales (Balænoptera musculus):






3 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
#2
( This post was last modified: 12-05-2019, 11:00 PM by BorneanTiger )

Despite having member species that are the biggest animals ever known to have lived on the planet, especially the blue whale (Balænoptera musculus), this group of whales has predators, at least the orca or killer whale (Orcinus orca), a large species of dolphin which likely got its latter name from killing baleen whales, and was thus called "whale killer": https://animals.howstuffworks.com/mammal...-whale.htmhttps://marinebio.org/species/orcas-kill...inus-orca/

- Minke whale:




- Right whale: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/sout...vade-orcas, https://ballenas.org.ar/descargas/public...whales.pdf

- Gray whale:







- Sub-adult pygmy blue whale: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-09/b...e/10982708, https://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-w...you-think/
   
2 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
#3
( This post was last modified: 08-09-2020, 11:16 AM by BorneanTiger )

Despite having killed larger whales, besides whale calves, orcas have difficulty in chasing fast adult whales: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/...one-video/




Not only that, orcas do have enemies that can fight them, and they are humpback whales (Megaptera novæangliæ), which may not only fight to defend themselves or their calves, whether related or unrelated, though male humpbacks may harm calves by trying to woo their mothers (so their mothers would communicate with them in a secret, intimate manner to avoid being heard by males or predators, at least orcas), but also other marine mammals that orcas would prey on, such as seals, even if rarely and for reasons (such as that the humpbacks or their calves were attacked by the orcas beforehand):



thus Hakai Magazine refers to orcas and humpback whales respectively as 'Bullies' and 'Bouncers': https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/07/...seals-life, https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/...explained/, https://phys.org/news/2018-11-humpback-w...stern.html, https://qz.com/749836/humpback-whales-ar...r-mammals/, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n...180964545/
   















3 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
#4

(12-05-2019, 06:56 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote: Despite having killed larger whales, besides whale calves, orcas have difficulty in chasing fast adult whales: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/...one-video/




Not only that, orcas do have enemies that can fight them, and they are humpback whales (Megaptera novæangliæ), which may not only fight to defend themselves or their calves, whether related or unrelated, though male humpbacks may harm calves by trying to woo their mothers (so their mothers would communicate with them in a secret, intimate manner to avoid being heard by males or predators, at least orcas), but also other marine mammals that orcas would prey on, such as seals, even if rarely and for reasons (such as that the humpbacks or their calves were attacked by the orcas beforehand):



thus Hakai Magazine refers to orcas and humpback whales respectively as 'Bullies' and 'Bouncers': https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/07/...seals-life, https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/...explained/, https://phys.org/news/2018-11-humpback-w...stern.html, https://qz.com/749836/humpback-whales-ar...r-mammals/, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n...180964545/

















Speaking of the tension between male and female humpbacks, not only may humpback mothers fight males to protect their calves: 




But humpbacks may also defend others from sharks: 



2 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
#5

Bryde's whales seen off the coast of Abu Dhabi: https://www.thenational.ae/uae/environme...t-1.962459https://www.khaleejtimes.com/uae/abu-dha...uae-waters
1 user Likes BorneanTiger's post
Reply

United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
*****
#6

Environmental drivers of large‐scale movements of baleen whales in the mid‐North Atlantic Ocean

Abstract

Aim
Understanding the environmental drivers of movement and habitat use of highly migratory marine species is crucial to implement appropriate management and conservation measures. However, this requires quantitative information on their spatial and temporal presence, which is limited in the high seas. Here, we aimed to gain insights of the essential habitats of three baleen whale species around the mid‐North Atlantic (NA) region, linking their large‐scale movements with information on oceanographic and biological processes.
Location
Mid‐NA Ocean.
Methods
We present the first study combining data from 31 satellite tracks of baleen whales (15, 10 and 6 from fin, blue and sei whales, respectively) from March to July (2008–2016) with data on remotely sensed oceanography and mid‐ and lower trophic level biomass derived from the spatial ecosystem and population dynamics model (SEAPODYM). A Bayesian switching state‐space model was applied to obtain regular tracks and correct for location errors, and pseudo‐absences were created through simulated positions using a correlated random walk model. Based on the tracks and pseudo‐absences, we applied generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs) to determine the probability of occurrence and predict monthly distributions.
Results
This study provides the most detailed research on the spatio‐temporal distribution of baleen whales in the mid‐NA, showing how dynamic biophysical processes determine their habitat preference. Movement patterns were mainly influenced by the interaction of temperature and the lower trophic level biomass; however, this relationship differed substantially among species. Best‐fit models suggest that movements of whales migrating towards more productive areas in northern latitudes were constrained by depth and eddy kinetic energy.
Main conclusions
These novel insights highlight the importance of integrating telemetry data with spatially explicit prey models to understand which factors shape the movement patterns of highly migratory species across large geographical scales. In addition, our outcomes could contribute to inform management of anthropogenic threats to baleen whales in sparsely surveyed region.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
3 users Like Sully's post
Reply

United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
*****
#7




"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
2 users Like Sully's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#8

"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
2 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

Malaysia scilover Offline
Member
**
#9

"What is baleen? There are 14 species of baleen whale including the blue, bowhead, right, humpback, minke and grey whale. Baleen whales are generally larger than toothed whales except for the sperm whale which is very big and has teeth."

I just knew :')
1 user Likes scilover's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB