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Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus)

India Vinod Offline
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#1

Just another predator that fell prey to Royal hunting games, the Indian Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) is the only specie which became extinct in India in last 100 years.


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It is believed that the last three Indian Cheetahs were shot in 1947 in Sarguja, Madhya Pradesh by Maharajah Ramanuj Pratap Singh Deo. He can be seen here with the last Indian Cheetahs

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a rare footage of pet Cheetahs hunting for their masters




A cheetah party returning from hunt c 1900

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 an Indian cheetah preserved at the Regional Museum of Natural History, Mysore.

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a photograph of Indian Cheetah cubs by Major G.S. Rodon at Dharwar, August 17, 1897

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a hunting party Baroda, around 1895

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India Sanju Offline
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#2

Five wildlife conservationists held by Iran could face the death penalty
by Mongabay.com on 27 November 2018
  • Four conservationists arrested for suspected espionage in Iran in January face charges of “sowing corruption on Earth.”
  • The charges stem from the team’s use of camera traps to track the Asiatic cheetah, but Iran’s Revolutionary Guard contends that the accused were collecting information on the country’s missile program.
  • If convicted, the conservationists could be sentenced to death.
Up to five conservation researchers accused of spying by the Iranian government could face the death penalty if convicted, according to multiple media reports.
Conservationists Niloufar Bayani, Taher Ghadirian, Houman Jowkar, Sepideh Kashani and Morad Tahbaz work with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation on the conservation of different wildlife species in Iran, which includes monitoring animals such as Asiatic cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) with camera traps. The country’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which reports to the country’s supreme leader, alleges that the team used camera traps to collect information on Iran’s missile program, Science magazine reported Oct. 30.

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The eight environmentalists from the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation currently being held in Iran on charges related to espionage. Image © #anyhopefornature.
The five are among a group of eight — which also includes Amir Hossein Khaleghi, Abdolreza Kouhpayeh and Sam Rajabi from the same organization — being held in custody, according to The Guardian newspaper and other media reports. A sociologist and manager of the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation, Kavous Seyed Emami, who was arrested in early 2018, died under suspicious circumstances in February while in custody, observers said according to a report in The New York Times.
“This is a very bizarre charge to bring against environmental activists,” Tara Sepehri Far, a researcher with Human Rights Watch (HRW), told Science.
After months of confinement, five of the eight conservationists were charged with the crime of “sowing corruption on Earth” in early October, The Guardian wrote. (Science reported that only four of them — Bayani, Ghadirian, Jowkar and Tahbaz — were charged with the capital offense.)
“Nine months of pre-trial detention with no clear charges and no access to a lawyer is an unusually long time even by Iran’s dismal due process standards. It’s hard not to conclude that the authorities are struggling to gather enough evidence to charge them with any recognizable crime,” Sepehri Far wrote in a post for the Atlantic Council, a think tank, before the revelation of the charges.

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The Asiatic cheetah, likely numbering fewer than 50 individuals, is found only in Iran. Image by Tasnim News Agency via Wikimedia Commons (CC 4.0).
She said an investigation at the behest of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani did not find that the accused environmentalists were spies, which put them at the center of a “domestic power struggle” with hard-liners in the judiciary and the Revolutionary Guard.
If convicted, the environmentalists could face sentences ranging from six months up to the death penalty.
“It is hard to fathom how working to preserve the Iranian flora and fauna can possibly be linked to conducting espionage against Iranian interests,” a group of experts calling on the Iranian government to have the charges dropped said in a statement from the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.
Jon Paul Rodríguez, a biologist at the Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research and chair of IUCN Species Survival Commission, highlighted the value of the work that the researchers had been doing.
“As far as I am aware, practically the only information we have on the Asiatic cheetah comes from camera traps,” he said.
Asiatic cheetahs likely number fewer than 50 individuals, based on a 2017 study co-authored by Jowkar, one of the people charged in this case, and the IUCN has considered the subspecies critically endangered since 1996.
Because cheetahs live at low densities, the traps represent a much more efficient and economical tool to get an accurate picture of their population. In Botswana in southern Africa, scientists have used camera traps to demonstrate to ranchers that a cheetah on their property isn’t as dangerous to their livestock as they might think.

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An Asiatic cheetah in Miandasht Wildlife Refuge in Iran. Image by Behnam Ghorbani via Wikimedia Commons (CC 4.0).
The detentions and the charges leveled have rattled the international scientific community.
“IUCN is deeply alarmed by the charges,” Rodríguez said.
First reported by Science, hundreds of scientists have signed a letter asking Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s supreme leader, to ensure a fair and “transparent” trial for the eight researchers.
Banner image of an Asiatic cheetah by Behnam Ghorbani via Wikimedia Commons (CC 4.0).

CITATION
Khalatbari, L., Jowkar, H., Yusefi, G. H., Brito, J. C., and Ostrowski, S. (2017). The current status of Asiatic cheetah in Iran. Cat News, 66, 10-13.

https://news.mongabay.com/2018/11/four-w...h-penalty/
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Sanju Offline
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#3
( This post was last modified: 03-04-2020, 12:41 PM by Rishi )

Miracles like this can save Asiatic/Iranian cheetah from Extinction.

PWHF- Sighting of a Super Mom Cheetah with 4 cubs.




https://montrealgazette.com/news/local-n...h-sentence
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Sanju Offline
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#4
( This post was last modified: 12-14-2018, 12:05 PM by Rishi )







This is filmed in the state of Bhavnagar (Saurashtra- Gujarat). Recently published in book on Maharaja Krishnakumarsinghji contains reference to National Geographic channel. This maharaja had Cheetahs freely roaming within Palace. When Mahatma Gandhi visited the maharaja, one cheetah groaned/hissed but did nothing. The mahatma said: I have been trying to teach Indians in South Africa since two decades but you have trained cheetah to maintain restrain! (lol-he don't know cheetah is the least hostile and aggressive wild medium sized cat in the world and most docile). 
Black bucks are not killed by farmers to-day but they are not as fanatics as Bishnois [(also known as Vishnoi) is an eco-friendly Hindu religious sect or community found in the Western Thar Desert and northern states of India who follow a set of 29 principles/commandments given by Guru Jambheshwar (1451-1536)] of Rajasthan. Wild animals can not be expected to follow such practices.
Black bucks. Bishnoi, Rajasthan
^(Video)
They are the most dedicated conservational common people/community in the world not IMO, its universal. How much dedication? women even allow to suckle/breast feed gazelles and deer fawns alongside their own human neonatal infants/babies.



------------> There are tons and millions of these videos.
A Similar hunting video with a cheetah in an Arabian country.




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The Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus), which was declared extinct in India over 60 years ago. It is the best of the big cats with high successful hunting skills and fastest land mammal on the planet. They are one of the most friendly wild animals on earth followed by jaguar and gir lions with little to no aggression. It had never harmed humanity with no recorded human fatalities in human history but some horrible ass holes killed them for sport and fun. Still in Iran, the Iranian cheetah is being killed because the herders are unable to distinguish between cheetah and leopard and consider it as a threat to live stock and themselves, many are killed by poaching and road accidents every year and the Iranian government running out of funds for conservation of Asiatic cheetah because US government stopped supporting them. So, conservation of these magnificent creatures is going difficulty.

Simple reason for their extinction is the Asiatic cheetah (hunting leopard-vernacular name) is disbelieved as leopard or any other big cat and considered as a threat to people and cattle by villagers and farmers.

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Kings and hunters killed them for fun, prestige and trophy hunting during 1900’s and at last in 1947, an idiot Maharaja of Surguja, the ruler of a princely state in Madhya Pradesh shot dead the last three cheetahs. 'He (Maharaja of Surguja) also bears the dark honor of holding the record for shooting the most tigers — a total of 1,360', states a July 2009 report by The Tribune .

But not all cheetahs in India were hunted down. 'Studies show that at least 200 cheetahs were killed in India during the colonial period mainly due to conflicts with sheep and goat herders, and not because they were shot by trophy hunters', states a report by the BBC

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Asiatic cheetah cubs with a dog in Dharwar, British India, 1897.

Some kings like Mughal emperor Akbar he reportedly as it was his favorite animal and had an army of 1,000 cheetahs which accompanied him on his hunting expeditions. Cheetah is a very shy animal and they reproduce very very rare in captivity. baring thousands of them in captivity, they almost didn’t reproduce and all were dead and gave off springs. The only way to save these species is assisted reproduction. These things make them extinct in India and the same thing might have happened in many other south-west Asian countries for other wild animals too, except last surviving population in Iran’s reserves with about less than 40 individuals which are going extinction coming few 2 to 3 years.


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Hunting of the blackbuck with the Indian cheetah; Drawn by James Forbes in South Gujarat, Western India. Oriental Memoirs, 1812.

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Maharajah Ramanuj Pratap Singh Deo shot three of the last cheetahs in India in 1948, in Surguja State, Madhya Pradesh. His private secretary submitted this photo to the Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society.

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Asiatic cheetah cubs in Dharwar, 1897

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Hunting of the blackbuck with the Indian cheetah; Drawn by James Forbes in South Gujarat, Western India. Oriental Memoirs, 1812.

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A cheetah with two imperial attendants, during the reign of Shah Alam II (India CE 1764)

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South Asian Nawabs with cheetahs

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Coat of arms of former Kolhapur State with two Asiatic cheetahs proper as supporters

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A painting depicting Akbar, the third Mughal emperor, hunting with locally trapped Indian cheetahs, c. 1602.
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India Sanju Offline
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#5
( This post was last modified: 12-14-2018, 11:38 AM by Rishi )


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http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6420/1255.1
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India Sanju Offline
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#6

DOE holds workshop on breeding Asiatic cheetah
December 23, 2018

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TEHRAN — A two-day workshop on methods for breeding Asiatic cheetah was held at Department of Environment on December 22-23, Mehr news agency reported.

Vincent van der Merwe, Eastern Cape Regional Coordinator at Endangered Wildlife Trust (ETW) Carnivore Conservation Programme, was the workshop instructor. 
According to the National Geographic van der Merwe in known as a cheetah matchmaker. Van der Merwe currently manages the Cheetah Metapopulation Project in southern Africa through the Endangered Wildlife Trust.

Quote:
The major goals of the Cheetah Metapopulation Project are to relocate cheetah between 55 metapopulation reserves to retain genetic integrity and to identify new reserves for reintroduction. To date, they have successfully coordinated 156 cheetah relocations between 41 game reserves in southern Africa since June 2011.

Quote:
Between June 2011 and May 2017 the cheetah metapopulation grew from 217 to 331, proving that metapopulation management can be a viable tool for increasing the resident range of wild cheetahs in Africa.

So they did a workshop to implement similar project on critically endangered Asiatic cheetahs to maintain metapopulations with the help of DOE Iran.

https://www.tehrantimes.com/news/431003/...ic-cheetah
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-19-2019, 10:59 PM by BorneanTiger )

As I was searching for images of Asiatic lions from the Middle East, particularly from Assyria, Mesopotamia (mostly Iraq) and Persia (Iran), I came across this image of an ancient Syrian relief from Palmyra, in Alamy:

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Though the caption says "2 Cent Palmyra Syria Syrian Museum Hunter Lion Tiger", the relief doesn't even appear to be of a leopard (which is in the genus Panthera like the lion, tiger, jaguar and snow leopard, as opposed to the cheetah's genus Acinonyx), given the spots (like jaguars, leopards have rosettes, as opposed to just spots), and as depicted shown by the work of Harrison and Bates, which I referenced in the main thread, the Levant was indeed occupied by the cheetah:

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To avoid clogging up the main thread, I made this one.
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United States Lycaon Offline
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#8

Two Venaticus spotted a few days ago in the semnan province.


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Credits: http://www.iew.ir/1398/06/08/61194
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-29-2019, 10:31 PM by BorneanTiger )

Here are some things that I mentioned in other threads:

1) The last record of the Asiatic cheetah in India wasn't of those 3 cheetahs that were shot by Maharajah Ramanuj Pratap Singh Deo (who is also notorious for killing 1,360 tigers) in 1947, but of a female sighted in 1951 in what is now the Koriya District of Chhattisgarh State (Divyabhanusinh (1999) The End of a Trail: the Cheetah in India). It is worth mentioning that in this area is Guru Ghasidas National Park, which is contiguous with Sanjay-Dubri Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh, and yes, this is a potential tiger territory, though no tiger was sighted between October 2008 and May 2009: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-indian-cheetah?pid=83599#pid83599

https://www.thenewsminute.com/article/last-indias-cheetahs-were-shot-maharajah-6-decades-later-governments-reintroduction-planhttps://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20090719/spectrum/nature.htmhttps://www.thehindu.com/news/national/other-states/chhattisgarh-asked-to-propose-tiger-reserve-status-for-guru-ghasidas-park/article2147726.ecehttps://web.archive.org/web/20120120232451/http://www.projecttiger.nic.in/whtsnew/Tiger_Status_oct_2010.pdf

Guru Ghasidas National Park Chhattisgarh State, next to Sanjay-Dubri Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh: https://www.outlookindia.com/outlooktraveller/explore/story/47894/guru-ghasidas-national-park-in-chhattisgarh

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2) There is an Arabic video of the lion, cheetah and leopard in the Arabian Peninsula or Middle East: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-cheetah-acinonyx-jubatus-data-pictures-videos?page=13




 
3) Iran is the last place confirmed to have cheetahs, but we do get reports of sightings from neighbouring places: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-cheetah-acinonyx-jubatus-data-pictures-videos?page=15

Near Khar Touran National Park and Miandasht Wildlife Refuge in northern Iran, where the cheetah is known to occur, is the country of Turkmenistan. In 2017, it was reported that a Turkmen horse breeder drew 2 big cats that he saw: One large with big spots and short legs, and the other that was sleek and had a long tail, calling the latter 'гепард' ('gepard', meaning 'cheetah'): https://www.panthera.org/blog/2017/10/04...lden-horse 

The Persian leopard (top) and cheetah (bottom) at Touran Biosphere Reserve: 

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@Lycaon mentioned a report of a sighting from Kazakhstan near the Aral Sea in 2011: https://en.tengrinews.kz/environment/Extinct-steppe-cheetah-was-found-in-Aral-4807/  

@Sanju and I gave this image showing a skin from Afghanistan: http://www.catsg.org/cheetah/01_information/1_3_periodical-reports/cat-news/Cat_News_49_2008_Cheetah_skin_in_Afghanistan.pdf
   
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-14-2019, 05:47 PM by BorneanTiger )

There are plenty of images of Kushki (or Kooshki) and Delbar, respectively a male and female, in Wikimedia Commons, from the work of Erfan Kouchari of Tasnim News Agency (which has more pictures):

Delbar with Kushki: 

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Kushki:

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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-14-2019, 05:48 PM by BorneanTiger )

(10-08-2019, 11:07 AM)BorneanTiger Wrote: There are plenty of images of Kushki (or Kooshki) and Delbar, respectively a male and female, in Wikimedia Commons, from the work of Erfan Kouchari of Tasnim News Agency (which has more pictures):

Delbar with Kushki: 

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Kushki:

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And also separate images of Kushki consuming a hare or rabbit by Wikimedia user N. Farid: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:..._rubit.jpghttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Koushki_2.jpghttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kushki_face.jpg


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United States Lycaon Offline
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#12

This asiatic cheetah does not ,look to pleased being camera trapped.


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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-14-2019, 04:49 PM by BorneanTiger )

Persian miniature from the 16th century showing a cheetah or leopard (top middle) hunted along with a lion (bottom right with an onager (Asiatic wild ass)), pages 80–81: https://books.google.com/books?id=esV0hc...&q&f=false
   
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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As mentioned here, I discovered something about Eram Zoo in Tehran, Iran. It was founded in the 19th century by the Qajari Shah Naser Ad-Din, who had a collection of a cheetah and 3 leopards from Jajrud, besides other animals, judging by this Farsi website of Animal Rights Watch.
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United States Lycaon Offline
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#15



recent video from Khar Turan.
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