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Animals have emotions too

India sanjay Offline
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#1

Baby Rhino Refuses to Sleep Alone After Witnessing His Mother’s Gruesome Death


*This image is copyright of its original author


Often we fail to realize that animals have emotions too, and suffer from a sense of loss when a family member dies.
A baby rhino was found 'crying inconsolably' next to his dead mother, who was brutally killed by poachers in South Africa.

According to The Independent:
Quote:Gertjie was rescued from the wild on 7 May by staff at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre (HESC) in South Africa after he was found next to his mother’s body."It was a devastating sight, as the tiny animal would not leave her side, and was crying inconsolably for her.”Gertjie, or ‘Little G’ as staff have nicknamed him, spent his first night at the center with a human minder and a sheep called Skaap, who acts as the surrogate mother to the animals there.





The good news is, the little rhino is responding to the care and regaining his strength. Now, almost 4 months old, he will remain at the center till he is about 18 months old, after which he will be reintroduced into the wild.The team are appealing for donations to ensure enough fat-free milk for the baby rhino. 
Please donate here.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#2
( This post was last modified: 06-15-2014, 09:35 PM by GuateGojira )

Animals DO have emotions.

Although this emotions are not as evolved as human ones, animals have strong feelings, specially at this earlier age. The trauma that this little rhino lived is terrible. He will need all the help possible in the future.

 
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India sanjay Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-16-2014, 12:06 AM by sanjay )

I think this vary from animal to animal. Apes and Monkey more emotional compare to other animals
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#4

Mammals and birds as a whole seem very sensitive. An anecdote of animal emotion I remember reading the case of a mother elephant who went berzerk against any human she saw after her child was killed by villagers. When they killed her, they found human remains inside of her! Revenge takes plenty of emotion and intelligence, which clearly this elephant possessed.
From my own experience, birds have so many emotions, especially parrots. It can get so bad that they mutilate themselves if something emotionally bothers them. Parrots just seemed evolved for bonding to someone.
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India sanjay Offline
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You are right, I had also one of my pet as parrot, and he give me more response compare to other
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United States Pckts Offline
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#6

Animals are far more affected by emotion than humans, IMO.
Dogs are the perfect example...
Kenneled our dog for 4 day, he literally got so sick that he almost died.
Came home and I swore he thought that he had been alone for years and was so excited.
Think about the mother tiger who attack the elephant and ranger atop of it when she was looking for her stolen cubs. The lioness who attacked the massive bull buffalo by herself when she saw her dead cub from lone lion doc. etc..
Animals run the spectrum when it comes to emotions.
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India Vinod Offline
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(06-15-2014, 11:39 PM)'tigerluver' Wrote: Mammals and birds as a whole seem very sensitive. An anecdote of animal emotion I remember reading the case of a mother elephant who went berzerk against any human she saw after her child was killed by villagers. When they killed her, they found human remains inside of her! Revenge takes plenty of emotion and intelligence, which clearly this elephant possessed.


 

yup, elephants are highly emotional, here's an example, such behaviour has alos been noticed in the wild.





 

 

*This image is copyright of its original author
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India brotherbear Offline
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I have watched elephants ( documentaries ) showing reverence  to the bones of their dead; or seemingly so. 
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#9

(06-15-2014, 11:39 PM)'tigerluver' Wrote: Mammals and birds as a whole seem very sensitive. An anecdote of animal emotion I remember reading the case of a mother elephant who went berzerk against any human she saw after her child was killed by villagers. When they killed her, they found human remains inside of her! Revenge takes plenty of emotion and intelligence, which clearly this elephant possessed.
From my own experience, birds have so many emotions, especially parrots. It can get so bad that they mutilate themselves if something emotionally bothers them. Parrots just seemed evolved for bonding to someone.

 



I too have several parrots at home, they are very emotional and very intelligent.
They tend to get more attached to one person.
 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#10

(08-08-2014, 01:03 PM)'brotherbear' Wrote: I have watched elephants ( documentaries ) showing reverence  to the bones of their dead; or seemingly so. 

 



Hey Brotherbear, long time no see.
Nice to have you here.
 
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#11

(08-08-2014, 01:03 PM)'brotherbear' Wrote: I have watched elephants ( documentaries ) showing reverence  to the bones of their dead; or seemingly so. 

 
Hello Brotherbear! How are you? Welcome to the forum. [img]images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]
 
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India brotherbear Offline
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#12

Thank you guategojira. I am back on my feet ( somewhat ). I have also attempted to post over on the yuku site, Animal Battle, but cannot for whatever reason. I was surprised to discover AVA being a dead site now. But, these new sites appear to be pretty nice.
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India Vinod Offline
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#13

Adult elephants rush to help when baby elephant slips & falls onto its back.



 

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Polar Offline
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#14

Just stumbled here: I've seen quite a few cases of emotional outbursts when it came to various animals such as domesticated dogs and pigs. Strangely though, I haven't seen any with polar bears from my PBI trip.

IMO, most animals can/do have emotions that are on a similar level to ours: there are cases of trainers' animals dying of "broken-heart syndrome" and most animals tend to express emotions more freely due to lack of social penalty on emotion expression. Humans are emotional too, yet if I, for example, suddenly broke out in a loud wailing spell in the middle of a street, people would not respect/look at me the same.

This same rule applies to the relationship between males and females, of any species (including humans). Even without this social penalty, if a male breaks down emotionally in any way towards another male of his own species, the females will view him as a weaker male than the one who holds his emotions in. In humans, there is both a cultural and sex-related penalty on expressing emotion, and in animals, only the latter.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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