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Amur Tigers

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#31

Of course, that was a pleasant surprise. One more canine length, to the gum, this time from a young Amur male tiger.

By the way, I think that the shoulder height of 104 cm is not the standing, but the length from the shoulder to the tip of the paw. Using its body length (183 cm) as surrogate, I get a shoulder height of 91 cm. The difference is of 13 cm, which seems reliable. I will use this height for it.
 
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#32
( This post was last modified: 04-25-2014, 10:09 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

I wish he could grow up to 250kg in his prime and maybe have 6.5cm canine from the gumline.

But for now, it is unlikely that the prey density in the current Sikhote-Alin can sustain this huge size.

Also, he seems to be not very light for his shoulder height, so the prey condition for him looks somewhat decent.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#33
( This post was last modified: 04-25-2014, 10:43 AM by GuateGojira )

These tigers are not from Sikhote-Alin reserve but from the southern Ussurisk region. That is why I mention that these tigers seems larger than those from the northern area.

I believe that 250 kg is too high yet, but 220 kg is not out of discussion now.
 
Ps. The new average weight for male Amur tigers, >3 years old, is of 190 kg (n=23; range: 155 - 212 kg).
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#34

Yeah, it is my mistake.

Maybe the prey base is richer in the warmer southern coastal area.

It seems that peter is even more interested about the Amur tiger from Northeast China, but consider that the current natural habitat in China is even worse, the weight of these wild Amur tigers could even be more disappointing. It seems that the legendary Manchurian tigers have been completely vanished from the wild, and we can only see them in the captivity among the specimens such as Baikal and the Duisburg Zoo giant specimen.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#35

Can anyone translate this?

*This image is copyright of its original author

Here is the original link: http://www.ptr-vlad.ru/news/ptrnews/6134...nulya.html

I translate it with Google but the result is not too much satisfactory. The only that I could understand is that this is the male found dead in one of the old press articles posted some time ago, and that he weighed 200 kg, that was in apparently good health state but that only had 1 canine left.

Can you help me? [img]images/smilies/huh.gif[/img]



 
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#36

I think only Warsaw could help with this.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#37
( This post was last modified: 04-26-2014, 02:03 AM by GuateGojira )

The prey of the Amur tiger - new table:

In this table, from the document "Tooth breakage in tigers: cause for conflict?" from Goodrich et al. (2012), the Siberian Tiger Project (STP) offers for first time its table about the average body weight of the bears in the Sikhote-Alin region. Check it out:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Although they use the same source for the Wild boar, this table presents a higher body mass, and I agree, as those boars from the Russian Far East are reported to be huge, so a puny average of 120 kg will not reflect the weight of an average full grow boar.

As for the bear, the assumption of peter seems correct, as the STP present a higher average body mass for the male brown bear and a lower body mass for the female. I think that this data from 2012 is more reliable. I will try to found more data, writing to Dr Goodrich, let's see what I can get, whish me look. [img]images/smilies/wink.gif[/img]

 
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#38

Isn't the Bengal tiger has highest tooth breakage?

BTW, Amur supposes to have the heaviest canines, at least in the captivity.
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Australia Richardrli Offline
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#39
( This post was last modified: 04-26-2014, 11:54 AM by Richardrli )

As far as I know, there is only one group studying Amur tigers at the moment. That's the Russian Amur Tiger Programme which was founded by president Vladimir Putin back in 2008. The Siberian Tiger Project by WCS involving Western researchers like John Goodrich was ended in 2011. I think this information is correct.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#40
( This post was last modified: 04-26-2014, 12:18 PM by GuateGojira )

I can't believe this, when was this announced? The page of WCS-Russia don't mention anything of this. [img]images/smilies/sad.gif[/img]

It is very sad.

 
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Australia Richardrli Offline
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#41
( This post was last modified: 04-26-2014, 12:46 PM by Richardrli )

(04-26-2014, 12:14 PM)'GuateGojira' Wrote: I can't believe this, when was this announced? The page of WCS-Russia don't mention anything of this. [img]images/smilies/sad.gif[/img]

It is very sad.

 

 
You'll notice that the WCS page on Amur tigers hasn't been updated for years, while the Amur Tiger Programme site is updated constantly.


 
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#42

No, the last news in the WCS-Russia page are from february of 2014. Check it: http://www.wcsrussia.org/en-us/home.aspx

What it is indeed important is that no document of the Siberian Tiger Project has been published since 2012. I have not found a paper after this date. However, on the other hand, I have not saw a single paper published by the Amur Tiger Programme. Weird, don't you think?

 
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Australia Richardrli Offline
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#43
( This post was last modified: 04-26-2014, 02:58 PM by Richardrli )

(04-26-2014, 01:10 PM)'GuateGojira' Wrote: No, the last news in the WCS-Russia page are from february of 2014. Check it: http://www.wcsrussia.org/en-us/home.aspx

What it is indeed important is that no document of the Siberian Tiger Project has been published since 2012. I have not found a paper after this date. However, on the other hand, I have not saw a single paper published by the Amur Tiger Programme. Weird, don't you think?

 

 
I made a mistake when I said that their website hasn't been updated, I was looking specifically at the "Siberian Tiger Project" page where there's no new reports and as you said there have not been any new publication from them for the past two years. I think the situation now is that the Siberian Tiger Project itself has ended but WCS continues to monitor the tigers in the Far East while the Amur Tiger Programme has taken on the main role. As for why they haven't published any papers, it's probably because of the language barrier between those researchers and English, but in time we should see something.


 
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#44

Richard,

If you order the book of Yudakov and Nikolaev, ask Miquelle about the WCS-project.
 

 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Away
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#45

Ecology and Conservation of the Siberian tiger - Dale Miquelle, Maurice Hornocker, Howard Quigley


Here is a table showing the percentage of young, yearlings and adults in elk and wildboar are hunted by Amur tigers.


*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



 
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