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Triceratops

Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-20-2017, 08:39 PM by epaiva )


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Triceratops is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that first appeared during the late Maastrichtian stage of the late Cretaceous period, about 68 million years ago (mya) in what is now North America. Individual Triceratops are estimated to have reached about 7.9 to 9.0 m (25.9–29.5 ft) in length, 2.9 to 3.0 m (9.5 to 9.8 ft) in height, and 6.1–12.0 tonnes (13,000–26,000 lb) in weight. The most distinctive feature is their large skull, among the largest of all land animals. The largest known skull (specimen MWC 7584, formerly BYU 12183) is estimated to have been 2.5 metres (8.2 ft) in length when complete, and could reach almost a third of the length of the entire animal. A specimen of T. horridus named Kelsey measured 7.3 metres (24 ft) long with a 1.98 metres (6.5 ft) skull, stood about 2.3 metres (7.5 ft) tall, and was estimated by the Black Hills institute to weight nearly 6 tonnes (5.9 long tons; 6.6 short tons). A Triceratops 8 metres (26 ft) long has been estimated by Gregory S. Paul to have massed 9.3 tonnes (9.2 long tons; 10.3 short tons). Pictures of Triceratops horridus displayed in American Museum of Natural Hstory in New York City, USA.
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-03-2017, 06:35 PM by epaiva )

Credits American Museum of Natural History


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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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My absolute favourite as a kid, even over the predators.
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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(08-17-2017, 06:16 PM)Tshokwane Wrote: My absolute favourite as a kid, even over the predators.

Like Dr Grant in "Jurassilk Park" (The first one Jurassik Park) !

I say that, I am not saying anything... Wink
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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I liked the triceratops very much too when I was kind. I believed they were the invincible herbivores, like the ankylosaurus, except that the ankylosaurus was only able to defend itself, not to attack. And I must admit to have been disappointed when I learned their horns weren't as sturdy as we thought.

During my childhood too, I really believed that the tyrex was the most nightmarish predator that ever lived on land, and I imagined that the triceratops was the only beast able to stand up against it, one versus one. Since then I have learnt to put into perpectives the predatory capacities of the former and the defensive capacities of the latter. Tyrex is perhaps not the performing predator that we imagined, and the triceratops is, first of all, an herbivore that lived in herds.
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United States Polar Offline
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My favorite dinosaur was the theropod Giganotosaurus, but Triceratops was close up there as well.

I used to also believe that the Tryannosaurus was the nemesis of Triceratops, similar to Amur Tiger vs Brown Bear and Lion vs Hyena, similar to those two.

There's also been a controversial debate a couple of years ago where a few scientists (Longrich and Field, 2012?) theorized that Triceratops was just a young Torosaurus, and many opposing studies stated that Triceratops was indeed a separate species from Torosaurus. The debate in 2012 made me a bit spooked as to how "the infamous Triceratops" could be considered as its smaller, less-famous relative.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@Polar :

About #6: They were very numerous species of ceratopsids that were a very prosperous family of dinosaurs. And, in my opinion, triceratops and torosaurus were simply the biggest known forms of ceratopsids. I couldn't believe either that triceratops was a juvenile form of torosaurus. As concerns their dimensions I consider it's not possible. Perhaps I'm wrong... I know that Horner too has considered that several dinosaurs species formed in fact one single specy depending on the external complexity form...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GrqB09hL5k&t=83s

May be yes, it's true, but this is a very bold interpretation.
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-18-2018, 02:40 AM by epaiva )

Credit to @royaltyrrell
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-30-2018, 07:46 PM by epaiva )

Triceratops skull
Credit to @terujojoe

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