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Tiger Predation

United States Pckts Offline
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(05-31-2016, 12:37 AM)Majingilane Wrote: Credits to Shom Alankar.

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Alankar Chandra

Saw different versions (crops) of this image floating around with different credits and stories [i]:)[/i] So thought it apt to post at major groups and clarify.
This was shot on 29th May evening safari at Ranthambhore behind Rajbagh lake at Zone 3. The story goes like this..
After 3 dry safaris (saw a tiger in each, but some in bushes, some far. No good for photos) the last 15 mins of the Sunday evening were full of action. T19's daughter taking down a Sambar deer. The Tigress was sitting in the open for about 3 hours, since the start of the safari. Around 6pm some Spotted and Sambar deers moved towards Rajbagh lake for drinking water. The Tigress kept watching them and then moved into the bushes. Around maybe 6.30pm she grabbed a Sambar in the bushes itself. Initially the action happened inside the bushes for 15 mins, then the Sambar resisted and reached the open area behind Rajbagh lake as seen in the picture. The Tigress never left the hold and was dragged out of the bushes along with the Sambar. There also the struggle continued and by the time the young Tigress took it down it was already (safari) time up for us. This also showed the inexperience of this sub-adult Tigress (25 month old) in killing, it was dragging the kill by its foot most of the time. A full grown Tiger would have taken hardly 5 mins to do this job and usually strangulated the prey immediately (and not given us any photo ops!)
There is a sequence of about 200 images of this hunt, since the time the Sambar and the Tigress came out in the open. This was quickly pulled and processed after the safari for posting on my profile page. Other images are of Tiger on top of Sambar, Tigress pulling the leg, both facing camera etc. Will share those sometime.
For those interested in exif -
Nikon D750, Nikon 600mm F4
600mm, F4, ISO 2000, 1/800s
Alankar Chandra
www.alankarchandra.com



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United States Pckts Offline
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Sharmilee with Langur kill
10th May 2016
CTR


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United States Pckts Offline
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More from Arrowhead hunting the Sambar

"The entire sequence how the arrow head knocked out the sambar deer on 29 may 2016 evening in zone 3.

Captured with nikon d7200 and 55-300 mm lens"


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United States Pckts Offline
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Irfan Borgave


In the morning safari at Ranthambor, zone 3 , witnessed the kill , then the dragging & finally the breakfast.
Lightning, the 28 months old tigress , killed the wild boar.
It was pregnant female boar.
She ate 5 unborn piglets in front of us.
True.... The survival of fittest but difficult & sad to witness.

https://www.facebook.com/irfan.borgave/v...059350926/
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Russian Federation Diamir2 Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-08-2016, 04:27 AM by Diamir2 )


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Tiger predatory behaviour,ecology and conservation.John Seidensticker and Charles McDougal.1993.
"Karanth (1988) reported heavy prédation on solitary adult gaur in Nagarahole National Park in southern India." 

Wild Cats of the World.Mel Sunquist, Fiona Sunquist.2002.
"In Nagarahole National Park, the average weight of eighty-three tiger kills was 401 kilograms. This sample included several gaur weighing 1000 kg"

Behavioural correlates of predation by tiger,leopard and dhole in Nagarhole,India.Ullas Karanth,Mel Sunquist.2000.
"...88% of the 33 gaur kills(including all adults), resulted from thoat bites"

The Wild Cat Book.Mel Sunquist, Fiona Sunquist.2014.
"Tigers can single-handedly kill animals four or five times their own - a 500 pound male tiger can kill a 2000-pound bull gaur"

A View from Machan:How Science Can Save the Fragile Predator.Ullas Karanth.2007.
"....tigers routinely kill adult gaur five times their own weight"

Mammals of South Asia.A J T Johnsingh, Nima Manjrekar.2013.
"The biggest prey killed by tigers are adult bull gaur weighing over a tonne,five times their own size."

Wild Cats:Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan.Kristian Nowell and Peter Jackson.1996.
"...U.Karanth (pers.comm.) states that in India's Nagarhole National Park,gaur are the main prey,including bulls weighting up to 1000 kg"

ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION OF THE BENGAL TIGER IN THE SUNDARBANS MANGROVE FOREST OF BANGLADESH.A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge in partial fulfilment of the conditions of application for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.Mohammad Monirul Hasan Khan.2004.
"...Karanth and Sunquist (1992) state that in India’s Nagarhole NP, gaurs (Bos frontalis) are the main prey, including bulls weighing up to 1,000 kg."

Prey preferences of the tiger Panthera tigris.Matt W Hayward, W Jedrzejewski, B  Jedrzejewska.2012.
"They are capable of capturing and killed large prey,including adult male gaur Bos gaur" 
 
Wild Cats of the World.Luke Hunter.2015.
"They are capable of killing adult Gaur and Asiatic Water Buffalo exceeding 1000kg... "

Attached Files
.pdf   Behavioural correlates of predation.pdf (Size: 356.89 KB / Downloads: 11)
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India sanjay Offline
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Welcome to the forum @Diamir2. This is some rare information. Many thanks for starting contributing
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-10-2016, 05:48 PM by Apollo )

 She is lightning, daughter of T19, eating a wild boar. 28.05.201











T63 killed a samber deer and sharing with her cubs who are only 06 months old.





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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-12-2016, 09:05 AM by Apollo )

Tigress Noor (T39) killing a sambar.
Look at her musculature. She is a very well built cat.











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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Tigress Maya and her cubs hunting wildboar.
It was a perfectly planned ambush, Maya was hiding behind the mount and the female cub chased the wild boar herd towards Maya.




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Virgin Islands, U.S. Rage2277 Offline
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 tigress with leopard kill in sariska june 2016
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United States Pckts Offline
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Lionel Falcão

Jaws of death....

TATR - 2016

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Italy Spalea Offline
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@Pckts:

Impressive photo ! But what animal does he hold in his jaws ? A wild boar ?

His foreleg is awesome !
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United States Pckts Offline
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Yes, looks like an adult boar, male most likely looking at the size. An impressive kill considering the size and attitude of a male boar!
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United States Pckts Offline
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Varun Thakkar

Lucky enough to see the wildlife photography of 1985. (31 years from now).
When there used 2 be no D-SLR's they used 2 shoot with all manual camers with a limited ISO film's and manual focussing lens.
Just imagine 2day's world we see our picture right on sopt, just d very second we shoot it. What if we get such a rarest of rare moment which was never captured before, and we use a film camera on a complete manual mode, and we don't know if we have got the right moment with a right exposure and exact focus.
They never had photoshop or lightroom or any software that could help....
They get 2 see the picture only and only after developing the film.
People like Bedi brothers are and will be the baap's and guru's for each and every wildlifer like all of us.
Thanx alot Rajesh Bedi sir for sharing this.
Respect

Rajesh Bedi


Tigress eating a full grown Leopard in Kanha in the year 1985.We both brothers were lucky to record on film and pictures.Lot of experts were in a opinion that this was perhaps the first photographic record

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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-21-2016, 11:12 PM by Pckts )

(06-17-2016, 12:27 AM)Pckts Wrote: Yes, looks like an adult boar, male most likely looking at the size. An impressive kill considering the size and attitude of a male boar!

I was right, it was an adult Male Boar.

Lionel Falcão

Gone in 60 seconds....
TATR - June 2016
Note : besides cropping no post processing done.
Gear used : Canon 5d & Sigma 150-600 sport


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Size of Indian Wild boars
"Physical Traits The thick coat of the wild boar of India is grayish-black in color and is covered with bristle-like hair. It can grow upto a length of 6 feet and may weigh as much as 440 lb (200 kg). The features of a wild boar are quite similar to that of a pig. It has a prominent ridge of hair, which match the spine. The tail is short and straight and the snout is quite narrow. The most noticeable as well as most distinguishing feature of the wild boars comprise of a pair of extended canines. These canines grow both upward as well as outward. Indian wild boars possess an acute sense of smell. Even their eyesight and hearing power is fairly strong." Read more at http://www.iloveindia.com/wildlife/india...s4uMoBW.99

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