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Tiger Predation

United States Rage2277 Offline
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Ashutosh Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-28-2024, 11:14 PM by Ashutosh )

Baras aka T65 of Pench takes down a massive male boar. Baras herself is a big tigress and the boar nearly matches her in size:



It was a successful hunt. She has a young litter of 3 to feed as well:

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Ashutosh Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-14-2024, 11:26 PM by Ashutosh )

Continuing the tradition of her foremothers, here is Riddhi and her cubs on a crocodile kill in Ranthambore:

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Apex Titan Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-15-2024, 11:43 PM by Apex Titan )

(04-14-2024, 11:24 PM)Ashutosh Wrote: Continuing the tradition of her foremothers, here is Riddhi and her cubs on a crocodile kill in Ranthambore:


Here's a better and more close-up view. It looks like an adult crocodile she killed:




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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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@Apex Titan 

Your last post #2721 of the Extinction thread/tiger is very interesting. But for some unknown reason I couldn't neither put a "like" under your post nor to answer to you. Thus I do it here.

As concerns the tiger's apex predator strain on the dholes, it's perhaps important to notice the small areas of the Indian natural parks: 300-500 km2 in average i.e. only two or three times the surface of the hunting domain of a male tiger. And as soon as the the dholes want to escape from the tiger's predation pressure by leaving the reserve for example, they end up into the human settlements of the most inhabited state of the world. It's a very precarious situation.!

You mention the lion's apex predator strain on the African wild dogs, the African natural parks are much bigger than in India, the biggest of all is the Selous reserve in Tanzania: 55.000 km2. Other smaller ones but more famous, the Kruger National park in South-Africa reaches 20.000 km2. the Tsavo NAtional Park in Kenya: 22.000 km2 and so on. Under these conditions I believe the African wild dog condition isn't as critical as the dhole's one. Even if we don't have to forget that the wild canids are very faithful to their territories.
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peter Offline
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(05-14-2024, 06:45 AM)Spalea Wrote: @Apex Titan 

Your last post #2721 of the Extinction thread/tiger is very interesting. But for some unknown reason I couldn't neither put a "like" under your post nor to answer to you. Thus I do it here.

As concerns the tiger's apex predator strain on the dholes, it's perhaps important to notice the small areas of the Indian natural parks: 300-500 km2 in average i.e. only two or three times the surface of the hunting domain of a male tiger. And as soon as the the dholes want to escape from the tiger's predation pressure by leaving the reserve for example, they end up into the human settlements of the most inhabited state of the world. It's a very precarious situation.!

You mention the lion's apex predator strain on  the African wild dogs, the African natural parks are much bigger than in India, the biggest of all is the Selous reserve in Tanzania: 55.000 km2. Other smaller ones but more famous, the Kruger National park in South-Africa reaches 20.000 km2. the Tsavo NAtional Park in Kenya: 22.000 km2 and so on. Under these conditions I believe the African wild dog condition isn't as critical as the dhole's one. Even if we don't have to forget that the wild canids are very faithful to their territories.

SPALEA

Sorry about the limitations in the tiger extinction thread. A result of problems in the past. Only few have access for that reason.
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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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@peter : thank you for having replied to me.
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United States Rage2277 Offline
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Apex Titan Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-01-2024, 06:59 PM by Apex Titan )

Young male tiger 'Shankar' easily kills an adult sloth bear. 

This proves that even when a young tiger is actually determined to kill an adult sloth bear, it can do so quickly with no problem:




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Male tiger resting after feeding on his gaur kill:





His gaur kill:


*This image is copyright of its original author




Tiger chasing gaur herd:




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