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Tiger Predation

Finland Shadow Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-18-2020, 11:57 PM by Shadow )

(02-18-2020, 06:30 PM)Rage2277 Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 03:07 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 05:57 AM)Rage2277 Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 05:40 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 05:29 AM)Rage2277 Wrote: i mean..there's more than enough solid cases of tigers killing adult gaur with bulls they usually just hamstring and eat them alive like in the pic of munna with his bull kill

All people choose what they keep solid themselves. I might be more critical than others. I do believe, that tigers kill these animals, but I´m not at all convinced, that all claimed cases are clear. But this one is for me solid. Some others too, but since so rare are clear, this kind which have been examined are very interesting for me.

idk..it's pretty clear they were killed..when ever i see big cats with dead bovines i never assume they found them these animals aren't just getting sick and dropping dead..that's actually rare..like what are the odds..gaur or buffalo like all other prey of big cats die to predation more than anything else

Lions are known eat for instance elephants, which have died to natural causes, not predated. I don´t see any reason to doubt, that any other predators would pass "free meal" when noticing such. Many herbivores die to natural causes, there are simply too many of them to be all hunted by predators. So when I see a lion or tiger eating elephant or rhino or let´s say hippo, the first thought in my mind isn´t that they killed those animals, when we are talking about adults. They are simply so big and strong, that it feels more probable, that predator has found the carcass, especially with elephants and big rhinos. When we look at let´s say gaurs, as I said, I don´t see it impossible at all. But when talking about big bulls, I don´t take it for granted, that every carcass eaten by a tiger has been killed by it. For sure some have been, I don´t see it as something impossible, but it´s not easy either and I doubt that all tigers are able to do it. And hamstring is a term often used, but there are controversial opinions about it too. Some say, that it happens, when and if it happens more by accident than on purpose, while chasing. I have to say, that I can understand both sides, it´s far from easy to do too accurate things while running in full speed, but still some individuals show time to time very impressive skills. 

I wish, that some day we would see at least some photos in which a tiger and bull gaur "on action", but that obviously is very difficult thing and most probably most serious hunts concerning them happen in nighttime. But who knows if one day someone is lucky enough. Some luck is needed, when we are talking about rare things happening in covered terrain in dark.
elephant,rhino and hippo are in diff leagues to gaur the adults of these animals can't be killed by throat bites and hamstringing but adult gaur male or female can be killed,have been killed and do get killed by these methods and hamstringing isn't something that happens in a chase it's nothing complex the tigers literally chew off the tendons of the back legs to immobilize the gaur and just eat them alive or go for the neck after, that is something they intentionally do it's pretty obvious..they've even done it to smaller prey like sambar and nilgai lions do it too but not as often as tigers

You see it that way and I told how I see it. This is how it often is, when there is something like this. What is for you obvious isn´t quite the same for me and I wait (and hope) to see more one day. A fight between a tiger and a gaur bull is in many ways the ultimate challenge for tiger. Gaur is quite a package of relatively good movability, strength and size. Some say that cape buffalo is more dangerous and more aggressive. Can be, but gaurs are in average something like 100 kg more and as many examples show, when they are angry, far from "nice old man" and have all what it takes to give back. Hard and fast, if they aren´t taken by complete surprise to the ground. And as cape buffalos have shown, that big animal isn´t easy to keep down.

Anyway it´s not the end of the world if we see this slightly differently, I would bet that we both would like to see more of these two one day :)  But they don´t live in savannah so it might take some time... :/
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-20-2020, 12:35 PM by Rishi )

Bad news.... 



*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

A 14-16 years old tigress has died after a confrontation with a herd of gaurs at the Betla National Park, the core area of Palamau Tiger Reserve. The reserve’s field director YK Das said the tigress succumbed to her injuries at around 6pm on Saturday and her body was recovered around 7pm in Betla area.

“Injury marks and swelling were found on the body of the tigress in the post-mortem report. It seems the bison had lifted her up and slammed her to the ground.” Das said. The place where the tigress was found dead had numerous pug marks of both the big cat and bison, indicating a fierce tussle between them.
Secretary of Nature Conservation Society, D S Srivastava, who is also a Daltonganj-based tiger expert, said, “The tigress, which was 8.6-feet long, had a three inch-deep wound in her stomach which indicates a bison attack. Her claws and teeth were also worn out, probably due to old age.”


While this is the most concrete proof that there are still tigers remaining in Palamau area after all (2018 national report said there were none at the reserve), after about half a dozen or so indications over the past few years, but it's one less now.

She was quite old though, so it can be hoped that she managed to leave behind some cubs.


Sources;

https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/...pQ72I.html
https://m.timesofindia.com/city/ranchi/j...168116.cms
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-20-2020, 11:04 PM by Pckts )

Sahil Ak 
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This forest mesmerised you every time — at Kanha National Park.

*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author

Sahil AK Succeed after 3-4 failure attempts Kedar Chandavale :)
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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Finland Shadow Offline
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(02-20-2020, 09:29 AM)Rishi Wrote: Bad news.... 



*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

A 14-16 years old tigress has died after a confrontation with a herd of gaurs at the Betla National Park, the core area of Palamau Tiger Reserve. The reserve’s field director YK Das said the tigress succumbed to her injuries at around 6pm on Saturday and her body was recovered around 7pm in Betla area.

“Injury marks and swelling were found on the body of the tigress in the post-mortem report. It seems the bison had lifted her up and slammed her to the ground.” Das said. The place where the tigress was found dead had numerous pug marks of both the big cat and bison, indicating a fierce tussle between them.
Secretary of Nature Conservation Society, D S Srivastava, who is also a Daltonganj-based tiger expert, said, “The tigress, which was 8.6-feet long, had a three inch-deep wound in her stomach which indicates a bison attack. Her claws and teeth were also worn out, probably due to old age.”


While this is the most concrete proof that there are still tigers remaining in Palamau area after all (2018 national report said there were none at the reserve), after about half a dozen or so indications over the past few years, but it's one less now.

She was quite old though, so it can be hoped that she managed to leave behind some cubs.


Sources;

https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/...pQ72I.html
https://m.timesofindia.com/city/ranchi/j...168116.cms

Well, at least she was already quite old and she didn´t have to suffer prolonged starvation etc. , if looking something good what comes to this. That old tiger for sure in some way knew the risk she took. She lived like a predator and died like one... bad news.... I don´t know, she was obviously a brave one, imo :)
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United States Pckts Offline
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Virgin Islands, U.S. Rage2277 Offline
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อุทยานแห่งชาติแก่งกระจาน - Kaeng Krachan National Park-Let's check out the victims of the tiger's victims from patrolling in kaeng krachan forest area, patrol officer and staff (WCS) Thailand found traces of battle and found the carcass of a large buffalo bear which assumed to be a tiger. Eating as food, it can be seen that tiger is strong enough to hunt large, dangerous like buffalo bear. It is another thing that confirms the fullness of kaeng krachan forest.
PS. The picture may be scary, but it is true of nature.
PS. The purpose of showing this scary broadcast so that everyone can see that the forest is still perfect. There are wildlife living so that everyone can continue to preserve the forest as a home of wildlife.
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@Rage2277 :

About#1852: what do you call "Buffalo bear" ? Buffalo, yes, bear, yes, but buffalo bear... By seeing the photos of the account you posted, I believe you were speaking about sloth bear.

But it's impressive !
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United States Pckts Offline
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(02-27-2020, 08:08 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Rage2277 :

About#1852: what do you call "Buffalo bear" ? Buffalo, yes, bear, yes, but buffalo bear... By seeing the photos of the account you posted, I believe you were speaking about sloth bear.

But it's impressive !

My guess would be that they're saying a Male Bear but I'm not positive.
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Russian Federation Diamir2 Offline
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(02-27-2020, 07:56 PM)Rage2277 Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
อุทยานแห่งชาติแก่งกระจาน - Kaeng Krachan National Park-Let's check out the victims of the tiger's victims from patrolling in kaeng krachan forest area, patrol officer and staff (WCS) Thailand found traces of battle and found the carcass of a large buffalo bear which assumed to be a tiger. Eating as food, it can be seen that tiger is strong enough to hunt large, dangerous like buffalo bear. It is another thing that confirms the fullness of kaeng krachan forest.
PS. The picture may be scary, but it is true of nature.
PS. The purpose of showing this scary broadcast so that everyone can see that the forest is still perfect. There are wildlife living so that everyone can continue to preserve the forest as a home of wildlife.

It's himalayan black bear.
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Virgin Islands, U.S. Rage2277 Offline
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(02-27-2020, 08:08 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Rage2277 :

About#1852: what do you call "Buffalo bear" ? Buffalo, yes, bear, yes, but buffalo bear... By seeing the photos of the account you posted, I believe you were speaking about sloth bear.

But it's impressive !

not my writing,this is what was translated i guess that's what they call asiatic black bears in thai
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-27-2020, 09:54 PM by Rishi )

(02-27-2020, 08:08 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Rage2277 :

About#1852: what do you call "Buffalo bear" ? Buffalo, yes, bear, yes, but buffalo bear... By seeing the photos of the account you posted, I believe you were speaking about sloth bear.

But it's impressive !
(02-27-2020, 08:51 PM)Pckts Wrote: My guess would be that they're saying a Male Bear but I'm not positive.
(02-27-2020, 08:55 PM)Diamir2 Wrote: It's himalayan black bear.


It's a (not Himalayan) Black bear 100%... Buffalo is black. There's your connection, rest is lost in translation.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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(02-27-2020, 09:53 PM)Rishi Wrote:
(02-27-2020, 08:08 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Rage2277 :

About#1852: what do you call "Buffalo bear" ? Buffalo, yes, bear, yes, but buffalo bear... By seeing the photos of the account you posted, I believe you were speaking about sloth bear.

But it's impressive !
(02-27-2020, 08:51 PM)Pckts Wrote: My guess would be that they're saying a Male Bear but I'm not positive.
(02-27-2020, 08:55 PM)Diamir2 Wrote: It's himalayan black bear.


It's a (not Himalayan) Black bear 100%... Buffalo is black. There's your connection, rest is lost in translation.
@Rishi : black bear in Thailand ? Are you sure ?

In a first time, I was so used to hear speaking about sloth bears preyed by tigers that I naturelly supposed it was a sloth bear. But now, in Thailand I rather believe it's a sun bear...
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-28-2020, 12:39 AM by Rishi )

(02-27-2020, 11:41 PM)Spalea Wrote:
(02-27-2020, 09:53 PM)Rishi Wrote: It's a (not Himalayan) Black bear 100%... Buffalo is black. There's your connection, rest is lost in translation.
@Rishi : black bear in Thailand ? Are you sure ?

In a first time, I was so used to hear speaking about sloth bears preyed by tigers that I naturelly supposed it was a sloth bear. But now, in Thailand I rather believe it's a sun bear...

Positive!.. Sun bears don't have bushy, shaggy fur like that. Theirs is smooth & silky like a seal.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Asian black bears once ranged from Afghanistan, along Himalayas, to Russian far east via China & all of Indochina upto Malay peninsula... Now mostly Himalaya & Russia, parts of South China & Indochina. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Sloth bears were never found outside Indian subcontinent. They're (most likely) extinct in Bangladesh now, ranging within Aravalli hills & Brahmaputra basin.
*This image is copyright of its original author
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@Rishi :

About #1859: OK, you're right, I have only checked the black bear repartition on wikipedia ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_black_bear  ) and there the Thailand country is not mentioned...

Thank you for your very detailed answer ! From now on, I will not make any confusion about these bears' localization...
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