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Tiger Predation

Sri Lanka Apollo Away
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Afternoon safari slot at zone 6 on 25 October 2018. It was a great day because we saw a small skirmish between the tiger (One of the T8 cubs )and sloth bear at zone 6 in Ranthambhore National Park.




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Sri Lanka Apollo Away
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Noor tigress feeds on Sambar kill




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United States Pckts Offline
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Kaziranga Tiger kills a Calf



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Virgin Islands, U.S. Rage2277 Offline
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United States Pckts Offline
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Amit Sharma
The apex predator at it's best
Panthers Tigris killing Bos Gaurus.
In the magical woods of Central India.
Save them extinction is forever

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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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Sri Lanka Apollo Away
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Tiger trying to hunt sambar in Ranthambore lake




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Lycaon Offline
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Shilpa Chandolikar

Tiger eating pangolin.


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India Ashutosh Offline
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Very surprised about tigers eating pangolins. Most big cats get fed up with the scales as their bite does nothing to the pangolin. Would be interesting to see how a tiger goes about killing one of these.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Away
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Tiger hunts Chital at Corbett




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Sri Lanka Apollo Away
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Tiger kill Domestic Bull




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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-01-2019, 08:51 PM by Rishi )

Prey abundance and prey selection by tigers ( Panthera tigris ) in a semi-arid, dry deciduous forest in western India

Food habits of tigers Panthera tigris in terms of prey abundance were studied in the semi-arid deciduous forests of Ranthambhore National Park, western India, between November 2000 and April 2001. Wild prey availability was assessed by line transects (n = 8) and prey selection by the tigers was determined from analysis of scats (n = 109). Compared to some other parts of the country, prey abundance was found to be high at 96.65 animals km − 2 . Chital Axis axis wa st he most abundant wild prey in the study area, followed by common langur Presbytis entellus, sambar Cervus unicolor ,n ilgai Boselaphus tragocamelus, wild pig Sus scrofa and chinkara Gazella bennetti. Chital (c. 31%) and sambar (c. 47%) constituted the bulk of the tigers’ diet and were preferred prey. Nilgai and chinkara contributed minimally to the tigers’ diet (c. 5–7% and < 1%, respectively) and were used less than their availability. Domestic livestock made up 10–12% of the tigers’ diet. The average weight of an animal consumed was between 107 and 114 kg reflecting a preference for large prey. The analysis reveals that parts of Ranthambhore have high prey abundance, thus making it important for long-term tiger conservation. Despite the high prey abundance, tigers were still considerably dependent on domestic livestock, posing challenges for the park management to resolve potential areas of conflict. 
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Roflcopters Offline
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Thanks Sully, it’s a myth that tigers generally hunt smaller prey or 1/20 luck in tiger hunting. almost everyone i have interviewed from Kanha, Dudhwa, Tadoba, Bandhavgarh, Umred, Bandipur and various others says otherwise.
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India Ashutosh Offline
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Very true @Roflcopters. Collarwali from Pench was observed to be successful once every 3 or 4 attempts. And, it makes sense too. If a tigress can give birth to 30 cubs (raise 27 of them), it is not really plausible that she be successful once every 20 attempts. Her cubs would starve.

Also, a lot depends on what a tiger is attempting to kill. If a tiger is successful  once every 20 attempts in killing a gaur or a buffalo, then it’s not so bad afterall there is enough meat on it to keep him full for a week and fed for a couple of weeks. But, if that is ratio for a chital deer, then it’s a problem for the tiger.

And, the tiger prey varies from where they live. Couple of centuries ago, the tigers of Sunderbans preyed upon Javan rhinos who lived in the mangroves with them. Now, their 20% diet consists of crabs, turtles and fish. Ranthambore tigers don’t have access to large prey like Gaur or Water Buffalo, so the average weight of their prey would be lower than their counterparts in other places.
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