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The small creatures - Insects, Invertebrates and bugs

Rage2277 Offline
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#31

"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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Rage2277 Offline
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#32
( This post was last modified: 09-21-2018, 12:45 PM by Rage2277 )

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/anima...98067319=1 Known to take down animals as large as birds, mantises have now been spotted fishing for the first time outside captivity.
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#33

Credits to Kamil Stajniak Makrofotografia.

Myrmica cf. scabrinodis.

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#34
( This post was last modified: 10-24-2018, 05:48 PM by Tshokwane )

Credits to Luciano Richino.

Winged Atta cephalotes. 

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#35

Credits to Lifeunseen - Nick Monaghan's macro photography.

Members of the genus Myrmecia, aka Bullants and Jumper Ants, tend to have poor reputations due to their aggressive nature and painful stings, but they really can be beautiful at times, like this one I found in Dalgarup State Forest, south west Western Australia.

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#36

Credits to David Mora del Pozo. 

Info by Andrea Salimbeni.

Intraspecific aggression between two species of Reticulitermes. 

As with many termite with the slicing/slashing mandible type they attack with fast foward strikes with the aim to slice their opponent body and/or extremities. This forward strikes followed by a return to the original position allow them to attack distant enemies while remaining in cover (when available of course). 

They are the most aggressive toward a moving target, and will readily attack any non-termite object that disturb them (like a tweezer tip).

Click on it to play.



‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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United States brotherbear Offline
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#37

Helping the honeybees: https://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/local-v...t-lemonade
 > GRIZZLY ( Ursus arctos horribilis ) the AMERICAN BROWN BEAR <  
  
             
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#38

Credits to Ronald Zimmerman - Wildlife Photographer.

Most of my photographs are portraits of animals. You have to spend a lot of time in the field to encounter, witness and photograph animal behaviour. Because behaviour is harder to encounter and easy to disturb, scenes like this have a higher level of difficulty.


I was lucky enough to witness this fascinating “cleanup crew” scene while walking through the basecamp. I saw a dead gecko laying on his back being demounted part by part by ants Ectatomma brunneum. After this shot I saw an ant walking away with a foot. It all looked creepy, but as a biologist I find this very interesting. It is “the circle of life” at work. No nutrients will go to waste.
All the ants were walking around and eating parts like they were having a big “dinner table” or working at a car graveyard.

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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