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The Mighty Mapogos

India Raj8143 Offline
MR. T
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(11-24-2018, 11:13 PM)Mr.T Wrote: or the demon we called
SATAN mapogo


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I DID EVERYTHING AS PER THE NATURE... STILL THEY CALL ME (SATAN) MR .T
history will remember them u like it or not...!!! the LEGENDARY MAPOGOS...
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India Raj8143 Offline
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most aggressive and dominating coliation the MAPOGOS
I DID EVERYTHING AS PER THE NATURE... STILL THEY CALL ME (SATAN) MR .T
history will remember them u like it or not...!!! the LEGENDARY MAPOGOS...
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India Raj8143 Offline
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the legendary lion 
Makulu 1998-2013

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I DID EVERYTHING AS PER THE NATURE... STILL THEY CALL ME (SATAN) MR .T
history will remember them u like it or not...!!! the LEGENDARY MAPOGOS...
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India Raj8143 Offline
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must watch...!!!
Hilarious! Lioness attempting to lure uninterested Mapogo male Lion to mate!
Makhulu Mapogo: "How many times do I have to tell you?! NOT IN FRONT OF THE HUMAN!!! I don't want to give them the satisfaction!!"
Very funny - this lioness wanted to mate but the dominant Mapogo male was way too tired to be interested.  He´s the Boss! Didn't stop her at all...

+Date: 14. July 2011
+Location: Sabi Sand Game Reserve,  Mpumalanga, South Africa
+Filmed by: Nina Wennersten (Hippo Creek Safaris)*
*This video is copyright of its original author
I DID EVERYTHING AS PER THE NATURE... STILL THEY CALL ME (SATAN) MR .T
history will remember them u like it or not...!!! the LEGENDARY MAPOGOS...
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France Barbarosa Offline
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Hello everyone !
I am new here , I just read before.
I have just one question : i heard that the last time that wee see othawa m and t was in 2012 in Kruger Parc but now in 2019 any photo information ?
Thank you and sorry for my english.
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United States Charan Singh Offline
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I have few queries related to Mapogos: 

1. Did any of Mapogos son survive to rule any pride? 
2. Did Mr T kills all cubs after joining the coalition, even Makhulu's?
3. Is Mapogos bloodline still present in Sabi sands via daughters of Mapogos?
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Sweden Potato Offline
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1. Unknown. Othawa T and Othawa M - the only Mapogo's sons which made it to an age of nomadic life went into Kruger in 2012 and noone knows if they succeed or fail. 
2. Well... as you can imagine Mr T didn't make DNA test to the cubs before killing them.
3. Yes, whole Othawa, Mhangeni and Kambula prides as well as males which come from those prides.
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United States vinodkumarn Offline
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(01-28-2019, 11:54 PM)Charan Singh Wrote: I have few queries related to Mapogos: 

1. Did any of Mapogos son survive to rule any pride? 
2. Did Mr T kills all cubs after joining the coalition, even Makhulu's?
3. Is Mapogos bloodline still present in Sabi sands via daughters of Mapogos?

4 Mhangeni females (3 as of today, 1 disappeared) and two Adult Othawa females are their daughters
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Sweden Potato Offline
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That are the daughters, but there are also granddaughters: all Kambula lionesses, Mhangeni sub adults and younger Othawa lionesses. Also all cubs from those prides has Mapogo blood.
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Romania AbcXyz Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-30-2019, 12:55 AM by AbcXyz )

(01-13-2017, 01:32 AM)Georgel Wrote:
The Mapogos are back in town.
Tuesday, 8 January 2008

The Mapogos tend to spend most of their time in the southern parts of the Sabi Sands and enter Djuma from Chitwa or Hoffmans, crossing Cheetah cut line on to central road, then they pass around Gowrie waterhole area- and take Vuytela access road to Gowrie gate and cross into Simbambilli in the west and head back south from there. They are currently mating with one of the styx pride females. It is said that there are now 6 males in the Mapogo coalition ... again, that is true, but there is some speculation on who this other male might be. Some say that he is the brother who got killed by that croc in Mala Mala, other say he was a nomadic male who came from a different pride. All the guides in the area, are getting worried because the Mapogos are causing mayhem where ever they go! They have driven other lions out of the park and these lions have now started hunting cattle in the rural areas.

There are many stories of the Mapogos killing, attacking and taking over. These two videos were taken by Andre de Kock on his cell phone last winter at Arathusa of the Mapogos attacking the Tsalala pride and killing their cubs.

As many of you know our very own Kahuma pride were attacked and Blondie (one of the two male lions in control of the pride) was killed. The Kahumas fled into Manyaleti to the north with their 14 cubs and under the leadership of Dozie. This morning it was reported that their was an 'interaction' between some of the Kahuma females and the Mapogos on Djuma's northern border. Nobody was hurt, but clearly the Mapogos wish to mate with the Kahuma lionesses (along with every other lioness in the Sands), but because their cubs are still alive they are not receptive. It would appear that the Mapogos are not interested in travelling further north into the Manyaleti ... so for the moment the Kahuma cubs are safe, WE just don't get to see them.

There is little that can be done about these thugs. It has always been policy not to get involved in the natural progression of these things. However, there is now a lot of talk all over the Sands. Some have spoken of moving some of the Mapogos to another reserve or even shooting some of them. Everyone is angry, but decisions like this are highly unlikely and could only be taken by officials at the Kruger National Park, but it certainly shows the emotions these 6 big lions are bringing out.

https://wildearth.tv/2008/01/the-mapogos...ck-in-town

Kinky Tail

*This image is copyright of its original author

The link was broken and I replaced it with one that works.
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Romania AbcXyz Offline
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"Legendary Mapogo male lion

Once part of a 6 male strong coalition, this male lion known as Makulu is now one of 2 remaining Mapogo male lions." (Greg McCall-Peat)

https://rangerdiaries.com/diary/legendar...7g3jt_LDSs

Picture of Makhulu taken by Greg McCall-Peat


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Romania AbcXyz Offline
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"Lion warfare – Life’s tribulations
Karen Loader, June 16, 2018

I remember the morning like it was yesterday. At the time, I was working for the world renowned Londolozi Private Game Reserve as a Lodge Manager at Founders Camp where a Big Cat Safari has become synonyms with Londolozi.
We had a honeymoon couple, let’s just call them Mr and Mrs Smith who wanted to do something special and requested to sleep under the stars at the Londolozi lookout deck. Being a romantic at heart, the Founders team and I set up an incredible evening for this great couple.

Just think lanterns, candles, beautiful Londolozi bed, draped in an Out of Africa mosquito net, surrounded by an incredible River view, a finely prepared picnic dinner and an assortment of luxury beverages, not to mention the sounds and the incredible stars, bringing you closer to nature, a spiritual connection. What an incredible evening, little did they know the morning would bring a sighting like no other.

It was awesome to be out so early in the morning, still dark, the air was crisp and I had a sense of excitement about me that I couldn’t quite explain. I set off, following the sand river, passing Taylor’s dam and Pioneer Camps entrance and through open areas to Mhangene Double Crossing to where the look-out deck was situated.
Conversing with Mr and Mrs Smith over the radio I made my way through the giant Jackelberry trees towards the deck where the couple were eagerly awaiting, with big smiles, excited to tell me about their night and how special it was. After enjoying a fresh, hot cup of coffee we all set off back to camp to meet up with their guide Sandros, who would take them out on their morning game drive.

It was starting to get light now with a slight mist hovering over the dewy grass, Impala attentively watch us from the open areas and a chorus of baboons barking in the background alerted us to something incredible. With limited time, we moved on and followed the sounds, moving closer and closer to camp, we were eagerly followed the barks of the baboons. We had no idea what we would find.

With the barking escalating in volume and witnessing the baboons scrambling from tree to tree to get a better vantage point, we came to a sight that to this day is etched in my memory. Turning the corner towards the Pioneer entrance and the wall of Taylors dam, right where I had driven early this morning, were two of the famed Mapogo Male Lion Coalition, Kinky Tail and Mr T, devouring a sub adult hippo.

These Incredible lions, had successfully taken down an animal 4 times their size with ease and were now enjoying the spoils. It was an absolutely incredible sighting, positioning the vehicle so the guests could get the perfect shot, all I could hear was the “cha cha cha” of the shutter of Mr Smith’s Canon SLR like a semi-automatic machine gun, mixed with tearing flesh and low pitched growls as the two males fed.

Calling in the sighting we left to get back to camp to ensure we were able to meet up with the other guests. The lions had a large meal and we knew they would more than likely be there for some time, coming back to visit them later. It’s incredible.

We had to warn staff at Pioneer Camp to ensure they were aware of the lions right outside their entrance and to be mindful during the day as the interaction was bound to attract other predators to the scene.

The staff canteen was full of commotion about the lions and the hippo they had killed, so much so that we decided to go out to see how far the lions had got and whether there was another story to be told.

Heading back towards Taylors Dam, to where we had seen the lions that morning, we found not two but now four lions, two lionesses from the Styx pride had heard the commotion and had come to investigate.

It was an unusual sighting, as one of the lionesses you could see was quite skinny and clearly hungry but was not feeding, where the other lioness and older female was feeding alongside the males. Every time the younger lioness tried to feed, the males would aggressively confront her, forcing her to submit and retreat to a nearby bush. She would try again and the interaction would become more and more aggressive, leading to the flashback Friday image of the lioness bearing her teeth at Mr T. Sheer power seen in both lion’s bodies as they face off each other before the lioness very wisely submitted and retreated. Why was one lioness accepted and the other not? And what would happen next we all thought!

We would find out that evening, as the often tranquil evenings, was now filled with lion roars, growls and cries, that were so loud I don’t think anyone slept that night.

Investigating the area in the morning, we came across a gory sight, the lions had moved the hippo closer to Pioneer car park, and we could see by the spoor marks, fur and blood throughout the Pioneer car park that a huge fight had taken place that evening and someone had come off second best. But who?

We found out about an hour later over the radio, warning staff that there was a lioness walking through the staff village. The guides moved in to investigate to find the female breathing heavily at Camp Dam, she had been mauled by the two males and was in a bad state. Nature at her cruelest, watching the magnificent animal take her last breath in front of us was very sad. Why had the males killed her? It’s hard to understand the lion dynamics in the Sabi Sands, and ever changing saga, which fascinates us all on a daily basis.

Nothing is wasted in the end, the lioness’s body was later consumed by crocodiles who found her body on the banks of camp dam.

I will never forget the events of that day and it will forever stay with me and all that had the privilege of seeing nature in all her glory.

The circle of life."

https://unearthexperience.com/lion-warfa...xBpLTigP04

Kinky Tail – Photo Credit: Rory Loader


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Romania AbcXyz Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-29-2019, 11:23 PM by AbcXyz )

I AM LEGEND

“Legend” – A person whose fame or notoriety makes him a source of exaggerated or romanticized tales or exploits.



*This image is copyright of its original author


‘Legend’ is a word that is thrown around all too often in this day and age but the term surmises the reign of the Mapogo lions in the Sabi Sands to perfection. For the last 6 years or so, this notorious band of brothers has ruled the area with an iron paw. They are true warriors and have proved themselves time after time on the field of battle. During their prime, 6 of these magnificent specimens patrolled their territory, dispatching all competitors and striking fear into the hearts of all that found themselves in their way. Legend has it that the Mapogo have been responsible for killing in excess of 40 males, females and cubs as they stamped their authority on their domain. Whole prides have been wiped out in their relentless march for dominance and challengers have been eaten in an act of defiance: a fate almost unheard of in the species of Panthera leo. The former warden of the Sabi Sands has been cited saying that he believes them accountable for over 100 lion fatalities although the true number will probably never be known. Never before has the lion population known such a force and it is stories like this that have elevated their exploits to legendary status.


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


These brothers may have a fearsome reputation but in the world of the lion, they should be seen as the epitomes of what a successful coalition should be. They have been labeled as sadistic and remorseless to mention only a few adjectives assigned to them, but their exploits have ensured safe breeding grounds and stability in an area of unusually high competition. Their success has changed the dynamic of the lion population in this area forever and it is no surprise to me that litters are becoming more and more skewed in favour of male offspring. This is an inevitable outcome as nature attempts to balance the scales and provide a more level playing field.


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


In recent years, new and equally formidable coalitions have been responsible for whittling down the Mapogo’s numbers as territorial lines were drawn in the sand and crossed and repeated battles were waged. The Majingilanes in the north and the Southern Pride males in the south have both had their say in the shaping of the new regime and now all that remains of the mighty Mapogo are two aging specimens known as Makhulu and Pretty Boy. Since being overthrown by the Southern Pride males, the last of these legends have been sighted regularly on Sabi Sabi as they search for new territory or maybe just sanctuary as they live out the remainder of their days. At 14 and 12 years of age, they have surpassed the life expectancy of most male lions and carry the scars of years of conflict on the front line.


*This image is copyright of its original author


During my 6 years of working in the bush, I have been privileged to view and come into close contact with many different lions from different areas of South Africa and Tanzania but I can honestly say that I have never witnessed such magnificent specimens as these two remaining legends. Perhaps it is the stigma attached to them that accentuates their aura, but they are the most intimidating lions that I have laid eyes upon. It is not merely their freakish size and musculature that raises the adrenaline levels and starts the heart pounding, but the look contained deep within their eyes.


*This image is copyright of its original author


Peering into those yellow abysses one can truly feel the history and experience of many a hard fought battle in which the deciding factor was not just power, but a will to survive. Their eyes bore through you like no other lions I have even seen and I refuse to believe anyone who claims to not feel a slight pang of uncertainty when they stare back at you. The uneasiness of their presence is something that I have never felt before when watching the Kruger males. For fear of downplaying the current kings of Sabi Sabi, the last of the Mapogo make them look like kittens.


*This image is copyright of its original author


It is hard not to paint the Mapogos as terrifying, evil beasts due to the wrath they have rained down on the area but I hope that they are remembered as great rulers and protectors. They have raised the bar as to the expectations of male coalitions in so far as protecting a territory and ensuring their genetic success. They should be seen as role models, not killers.


*This image is copyright of its original author


In conclusion then, legendary status is hard to achieve but ask anyone who has worked in the Sabi Sands for the last 7 years and they will tell you tales of the Mapogo. Sadistic tyrants or protective fathers? Both could be claimed true but the fact is that their arrival heralded a new age of the lion population in the Sabi Sands. Love them or hate them, their exploits will never be forgotten. These tales will no doubt be embellished and exaggerated but this is how great icons are born. Over time, these stories will become myths and myths will become legends: a fitting legacy for the most famous lions of the modern era.


*This image is copyright of its original author


By: Ben Coley (Bush Lodge Ranger)

Images by: Ben Coley and Richard de Gouveia

https://www.sabisabi.com/blog/1360/i-am-legend/

Previously posted here: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-the-mig...6#pid28516, but from another source (not the original one!) and missing a lot of pictures.
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Romania AbcXyz Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-27-2019, 03:13 AM by AbcXyz )

An Ode to Kinky Tail, a Legend at MalaMala

MalaMala
June 22, 2012

The inimitable Kinky-Tail by Andrew Batchelor

*This image is copyright of its original author


One of our astute YouTube friends made an adept observation that it has been two years since Kinky Tail's demise.

Our more recent safari enthusiasts may not have heard of Kinky Tail – he was one of the legendary male lions to grace MalaMala in years past, and was part of the Mlowathi lion coalition. He met his very tragic and ultimately end during an epic battle with a rival coalition. Click here http://blog.malamala.com/index.php/2010/...-the-ages/ to read the account if you were not part of it way back then.

In lieu of the (close to) anniversary of the end of his reign, we though we would share this clip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wnibRs7txU of him and a Styx Pride  lioness roaring into the night.

I am sure that those who have been near a roaring lion will agree that nothing tops the real thing. But it comes close….

Here’s to Kinky Tail!

Happy weekend everyone,

The MalaMala Ranger Team

https://blog.malamala.com/index.php/2012...-malamala/
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Romania AbcXyz Offline
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(12-20-2016, 03:52 AM)Georgel Wrote: A saga for the ages

June 12, 2010, Mala Mala Blog

This battle between the Mlowathi males and the 5 young male lions from the Kruger National Park took place over a few days (8 – 11 June). It was a fight for dominance based on revenge, and one that ended (predictably) in bloodshed.
Although the action took place just north of MalaMala, the implications will have far reaching effects. On the night of the 7th the two Mlowathi brothers moved north. At the same time the five young male lions were making their way south after finishing a buffalo kill in the north.
During the early hours of the 8th, the two Mlowathi boys caught up with the five intruders, and started a battle that would last two days. The brothers attacked the Kruger Park lions, who then very quickly took off. The older, darker maned male was caught by the two dominant lions and severely mauled. His leg was broken and spine snapped, and he died from his injuries a short while later. They then roared their dominance out across the frosty morning before finding some shade to rest in.

That evening the rowdy pair was preparing to move west when the four brothers approached them from behind. They had returned to avenge their brother’s death. Caught unawares, the Mlowathi males hightailed it out of the area. But the four young lions proved too fast for them, and before long they’d caught ‘Kinky Tail’ and mauled him to within an inch of his life. They then left him and went after his brother, ‘Mohawk’. He was also caught, but managed to escape before too much harm could be inflicted. He kept running and crossed into MalaMala in the early hours of the 9th.
The four Kruger National Park brothers then returned to where they had left ‘Kinky Tail’, and finished him off. Not satisfied with just killing one of the legendary Mapogo male lions, they then proceeded to eat him too. Although cannibalism is extremely rare among lions, it does happen. Especially in situations where there is a quest for dominance. Once the Kruger brothers had finished feeding on ’Kinky Tail’, they moved south again and crossed into MalaMala on the 9th. During that same afternoon rangers found the remaining Mlowathi male at Mlowathi Dam. He looked fit enough and didn’t appear to have any serious injuries – at least none that could be seen. Having not yet realized what happened to his brother, ‘Mohawk’ roared through the night as he searched for him.
On the 10th he was still in the exact same spot, and continued roaring throughout the day and night, still hoping his brother would hear him. Late in the evening of the 10th, roaring was heard coming from the east in response to each of the remaining Mlowathi brother’s roars. Rangers rushed to find where the roars were coming from, and found three of the younger brothers lying in Ostrich Koppies Road at the junction of Rhino Walk. The fourth brother was spotted in the bush, a little further away. Tensions rose with each passing roar, giving the distinct impression that an all out war might well be imminent.
On the morning of the 11th, the rangers rushed back out to find the two parties and to see what had happened during the night. ‘Mohawk’ was nowhere to be seen, but tracks indicated he had gone north. The four brothers were still lying in the same spot, but had been joined by the lead female of the Styx pride sometime during the night. She was lying off to one side with the most dominant of the four males, and the pair was mating periodically. Just as evening settled in and the three blonde males started to move off, one of them spotted a pangolin and tried in vain to eat it. The male that was mating then began roaring, and soon his three brothers returned and joined in. When rangers left the area all five lions were roaring, and one very nervous pangolin was still rolled in a tight ball.

With the reign of the Mlowathi males coming to such an abrupt end, the lion dynamics have been thrown wide open. For now however, the most pressing concern is the tiny Eyrefield cubs and the new Styx cubs. Only time will tell, but given what’s happened, it doesn’t look good for them.

________________________________________________

Another inaccurate testimony of the fight between the Mlowathis and Majingilanes.

This write up of Mala Mala has a lot of misinformation, something unusual for Mala Mala articles. I suppose this happened since the battle didn't take place at Mala Mala, and their rangers wrote about what they were told.

The Nkorho rangers version of the story is well known, and in some parts quite the opposite, as in this particular case: "Caught unawares, the Mlowathi males hightailed it out of the area. But the four young lions proved too fast for them..." I'm sure everyone watched Kinky Tail chasing the Majingilanes.

This article is also a good lesson for us: don't trust the second hand information!
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