There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Great Apes

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******

Dereck Joubert: " News emerged today that the man who pleaded guilty to killing ‘Rafiki’, a famous silverback gorilla well known and loved by tourists visiting Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park, has been sentenced to 11 years in prison. It is justice served for the loss of such an incredible creature, but it cannot bring Rafiki back. His killing underscores the growing dangers faced by wildlife all across the continent – and the need to support those who protect and defend vulnerable species and their habitats. In order to raise vital funds to keep anti-poaching personnel and wildlife rangers on the frontlines, we created #ProjectRanger. Your support means they can continue to provide protection where it’s needed the most. Follow the link in bio to find out more. "


4 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******

Subhash Nair: " Man of the forest! - Orangutan photographed at Borneo, Indonesia "


4 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******

Ronan Donovan: " Mother and son feeding high in canopy of a fig tree in Uganda’s Kibale National Park. The female here is known as Mususu was roughly 35 at the time of this photo and her nursing son, Moon was 3. This community of wild chimps has been studied for ~40 years with every individual’s life history recorded in detail. This These massive figs belong to a Ficus capensis tree species and can provide weeks of ripened fruits for chimps to feed on. ⁣ "


4 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
( This post was last modified: 08-29-2020, 06:13 PM by BorneanTiger )

11 months after Kala the 9-year-old Western lowlander (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) lost her first-born, she gave birth to another baby at Bristol Zoo, after an emergency caesarean: https://bristolzoo.org.uk/latest-zoo-new...oo-gardens, https://news.sky.com/story/baby-gorilla-...n-12054497https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-bristol-53874594https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/ho...84191.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/...rilla.html

Credit: PA Media / Bristol Zoo
   
   



3 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******

David Whelan: " Chimpanzee portrait "


3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******

Subhash Nair: " Come in to my beautiful world! - Orangutan photographed at Borneo, Indonesia. "


4 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******

David Yarrow: " In recognition of #WorldGorillaDay, we wanted to show you one of the first pictures from our latest series from Rwanda. This was taken in Volcanoes National Park where we worked alongside their government, the Milton Group and Singita Group. It was a big collective effort over the week.⁣


Rest assured that COVID-19 regulation is very tight here - we all wore masks and were tested every second day.⁣

The Pilgrim⁣

Dian Fossey - the Californian zoologist who became the world’s leading authority on the mountain gorilla - left a formidable legacy when she was tragically murdered in 1985. Her resting place, high up in the rain forest, is visited regularly by those that want to pay homage to her life. Fossey’s famous book ‘Gorillas in the Mist’ chronicled her research and conservation work that helped to reduce the downward population trend in mountain gorillas, ultimately saving them from extinction.⁣

Her grave is a two and a half hour walk straight uphill from the little mountain village of Bisate on the edge of the National Park and over the years a well-trodden path has taken shape in what is otherwise a dense and fairly impenetrable rainforest.⁣

In all my times trekking through the forest in search of gorillas, I have never had the fortune to be able to use this path to access the gorillas - as quite simply it was too far from the location of any particular troop to be of use. But on this occasion during Covid 19 we were working tightly with the rangers - who advised us that the Umubano Group were near the Fossey trail.⁣

It certainly helped the trek to use the path, but far better than that, it transpired that a large Silverback from the Umubano Group - Bunyenyeri, 21 years old - was coming down the mountain on the same Fossey path and we met at 10,000 feet. ⁣

It was as good an encounter in open space that I can remember and he just stood on a ridge on the path and stared down at me. It was a glimpse, a moment in time and thankfully one that I was able to record.⁣

Maybe he had gone to pay his homage to Dian Fossey, we will never know, but we decided to call this photograph The Pilgrim. "





Unusual encounter...



*This image is copyright of its original author
4 users Like Spalea's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB