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ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - D - THE LEOPARD (Panthera pardus)

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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(05-16-2019, 01:34 PM)Luipaard Wrote:
(05-16-2019, 01:28 PM)Lycaon Wrote: @Luipaard 

Fortunatley barbary leopards are still extant though not much is known of their current status. Here a male in the morocco


*This image is copyright of its original author

Well they're as good as extinct given the lack of attention in Morocco and Algeria.

Few people do give them attention, it seems: 




By the way, check out what I posted about Caucasian or Persian leopards in European Russia: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-european-felids
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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Forward from (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-arabian...7#pid82037), the UAE Emirate of Sharjah has another wildlife center dedicated for Arabian animals, especially the leopard, that's the Arabian Wildlife Center, or "Arabia's Wildlife Center": https://www.alshindagah.com/may2001/7.html

*This image is copyright of its original author


https://universes.art/art-destinations/s...center/23/ 

*This image is copyright of its original author


This centre had a sister facility that's now closed to the public, the Breeding Centre for Endangered Arabian Wildlife (https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Arab..._277011088), which was replaced by Al Hefaiyah Mountain Conservation Centre near Kalba (http://www.sharjahupdate.com/2016/03/sha...-tourists/), which I mentioned above. Back in 2001, the Breeding Centre had assisted the Yemeni zoos of Sana'a and Ta'izz, themselves meant for breeding or conserving local fauna such as the leopard, with taking care of their animals (http://www.wmenews.com/Information/Other...-69pdf.pdf).

The old Breeding Centre: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Arab..._277011088 

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-22-2019, 09:44 PM by BorneanTiger )

(05-16-2019, 11:07 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote:
(05-16-2019, 01:34 PM)Luipaard Wrote:
(05-16-2019, 01:28 PM)Lycaon Wrote: @Luipaard 

Fortunatley barbary leopards are still extant though not much is known of their current status. Here a male in the morocco


*This image is copyright of its original author

Well they're as good as extinct given the lack of attention in Morocco and Algeria.

Few people do give them attention, it seems: 




By the way, check out what I posted about Caucasian or Persian leopards in European Russia: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-european-felids

Forward from (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-europea...7#pid82057), note that the Caucasus is to the east of the Black Sea, and that Anatolia is to the south of the sea. West of the sea lie the Balkans, including Greece: 

https://profwaqarhussain.blogspot.com/20...k-sea.html 

*This image is copyright of its original author


http://davidsbeenhere.com/2015/01/02/languages-balkans/ 

*This image is copyright of its original author


And it appears from the work of Homer that the leopard occurred in Greece, like the lion, lynx and bear: https://www.researchgate.net/publication...cal_record 
   

The twist is this, the Asiatic lion, which currently survives in India, and used to inhabit Anatolia and the Caucasus (https://archive.org/stream/mammalsofsov2...0/mode/2up), and is believed to be the same race as the Greek or European lion (https://books.google.com/books?id=TX7BmP...&q&f=false, https://books.google.com/books?id=GWslAA...on&f=false). If the European lion that occurred to the west of the Black Sea is the same race as the Asiatic lion, which occurred to the south and west of the sea, then is the Greek or European leopard, which occurred to the west of the sea, the same race as the Anatolian or Caucasian leopard (bearing in mind that both have been grouped as Panthera pardus tulliana, Pages 73–75: https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/hand...sAllowed=y)?
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Netherlands peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-22-2019, 07:53 PM by peter )

BORNEAN TIGER

You're on of the few who uses his own words to write posts. On top of that, nearly all posts have good info. Be sure it's much appreciated.

The disadvantage of writing your own posts is it often results typos, errors and the occasional slip of the tongue. This the reason I often have to edit long posts (referring to typos in particular).

I thought I saw a typo in your interesting last post, but I could be wrong here. I'm referring to your remark on the Caucasus located west of the Black Sea. You of course mean to the west of the Caspian. 

One question regarding Arabian leopards. Is the population completely isolated? Any research being conducted at the moment?
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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(05-22-2019, 07:51 PM)peter Wrote: BORNEAN TIGER

You're on of the few who uses his own words to write posts. On top of that, nearly all posts have good info. Be sure it's much appreciated.

The disadvantage of writing your own posts is it often results typos, errors and the occasional slip of the tongue. This the reason I often have to edit long posts (referring to typos in particular).

I thought I saw a typo in your interesting last post, but I could be wrong here. I'm referring to your remark on the Caucasus located west of the Black Sea. You of course mean to the west of the Caspian. 

One question regarding Arabian leopards. Is the population completely isolated? Any research being conducted at the moment?

Actually, there is more than one population of Arabian leopards. Ignoring the possibly extinct population of the Hajar Mountains of eastern UAE and northern Oman (http://www.catsg.org/fileadmin/fileshari...irates.pdf), there is a population at the Dhofar Mountains of southern Oman (https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...in-danger/), which are contiguous with the Hadhramaut Mountains of eastern Yemen, which are in turn contiguous with the Sarawat or Sarat Mountains of western Yemen and KSA (Saudi Arabia). The Sarawat stretch from southwest Yemen to northwest KSA on the border of the southern Levant (which has leopards: http://www.yemenileopard.org/files/cms/r...eopard.pdf), and are the longest and highest of the Arabian ranges, further divisible into the Haraz (southwest Yemen), Asir (southwestern KSA), and Hijaz (western KSA) subranges, with the Hijazi subrange having a subrange of its own, the Midian Mountains on the border of northwestern KSA and the southern Levant.

Judging from the work of the Cat Specialist Group (http://www.yemenileopard.org/files/cms/r...eopard.pdf), it seems that different populations are isolated from each other, but this would be based on confirmed sightings, and the only population which would have been likely isolated from others, historically, would have been at the Hajar Mountains, since this range is separated from other ranges of the peninsula, which form a chain extending from southern Oman and Yemen to northwestern KSA on the border with the southern Levant: 

The Arabian Leopards of Oman by Andrew Spalton and Hadi Al Hikmani, illustrated by Vicky Whitehttps://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...puts-arabi

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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(05-16-2019, 11:07 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote:
(05-16-2019, 01:34 PM)Luipaard Wrote:
(05-16-2019, 01:28 PM)Lycaon Wrote: @Luipaard 

Fortunatley barbary leopards are still extant though not much is known of their current status. Here a male in the morocco


*This image is copyright of its original author

Well they're as good as extinct given the lack of attention in Morocco and Algeria.

Few people do give them attention, it seems: 




By the way, check out what I posted about Caucasian or Persian leopards in European Russia: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-european-felids

Forward from (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-leopard...9#pid82539https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-african...0#pid82540), according to Sir Alfred Edward Pease, a British hunter in Africa who wrote the "Book of the lion" (https://archive.org/stream/bookoflion191...6/mode/2up), in the Atlas region of North Africa, the black panther, as in a melanistic version of the Barbary leopard, was a more ferocious and feared man-eater than the Barbary lion: 


*This image is copyright of its original author
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