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ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - A - THE TIGER (Panthera tigris)

United States Pckts Offline
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#61

Not sure how I feel about them claiming a "amur tiger" from everland zoo. It is well known the tigers there are hybrids.
Also using a white tiger and white lion  and no info on the sub species of african lion.
Why not use actual pure bred bengals and amurs as well as not using a white tiger. A white lion is probably fine as they occur in the wild from time to time, but still would rather not see them being used as well.
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#62

Hello everyone, after careful looking I finally found the owner of the 545 pound tiger from the Journal of bombay Natual history society. The hunters name was Col A. E. Ward which states he did not have the list of records of the tigers he shot, but he says he recalls one he shot weighed 545 pounds. I consider it reliable even though it is just off his memory.


*This image is copyright of its original author


 

Here is another view of the record...


*This image is copyright of its original author


"There are probably tigers which weigh as much as 500 to 600 lbs., but I have not the list of weights by me. I remember one of 545 lbs."
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#63
( This post was last modified: 05-17-2014, 11:17 AM by Kingtheropod )

Surgical management of subcutaneous cyst on the forelimb of a Royal Bengal Tiger 

"A 5 year-old female Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was reported as having a cyst-like structure on the left forelimb, confirmed by physical examination under general anaesthesia with xylazine and ketamine and fine needle aspiration. Surgical intervention was done by making a small stab incision with drainage of bloody fluid. The inner cyst wall was disrupted and packed with gauze soaked in tincture of iodine. No suture was given. Ceftriaxone (Trizon vet®, ACME Laboratories limited, Dhaka, Bangladesh) 30mg/kg body weight was injected daily for seven days intramuscularly. Antiseptic dressing was done every alternate day for 7 days. After one week the cyst cavity and inflammation subsided and complete recovery was evident. (Bangl. vet. 2013. Vol. 30, No. 2, 78 – 80)"

"An unusual soft fluctuating lump on the axial region of a five year-old Royal Bengal tiger, weighing 170 kg from the Safari Park, Gazipur, Bangladesh was reported to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. There were no signs of systemic illness, pain and discomfort. "

http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&e...7cpqS6NMCA

http://www.banglajol.info/index.php/BVET...view/18271

 
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#64

Excellent news on the Bengal tiger, a wild male of 247 kg and a captive female of 170 kg, both confirmed. These records most be used in our respective tables KingT, thanks for the information and the good investigation. [img]images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]
 
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#65

(05-05-2014, 11:54 PM)'GrizzlyClaws' Wrote: Some interesting neolithic big cat fossils from Japan.

http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/masa1908/53092342.html

http://blog.goo.ne.jp/tommz_1938/e/144aa...abcfa959ea

http://www.city.sano.lg.jp/kuzuufossil/k...21_01.html

 
This is very interesting. As far I know the only large cat that lived in Japan was Panthera palaeosinensis. This cat was previously clasified as a "tiger" but latter studies showed that it was more like a different species related with lions and leopards.

Can you translate it?
 
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#66

Well,  the translation say that this fossils are from "tigers" and that lived about 100,000 yeras ago in Japan. One page say up to 10 millions, but this is probably a bad translation.

Very interesting, don't you think?
 
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#67

(05-17-2014, 11:30 AM)'GuateGojira' Wrote: Excellent news on the Bengal tiger, a wild male of 247 kg and a captive female of 170 kg, both confirmed. These records most be used in our respective tables KingT, thanks for the information and the good investigation. [img]images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]
 
 

Thanks Guate, I have finally finished collecting all the data I have on bengal tigers and the new average weight for bengal tigers all added up together from India, Nepal, etc comes to a grand total of 204 kg (n=165)

I will be making a table with the full list and details shortly :)

 
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#68

(05-17-2014, 11:35 AM)'GuateGojira' Wrote:
(05-05-2014, 11:54 PM)'GrizzlyClaws' Wrote: Some interesting neolithic big cat fossils from Japan.

http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/masa1908/53092342.html

http://blog.goo.ne.jp/tommz_1938/e/144aa...abcfa959ea

http://www.city.sano.lg.jp/kuzuufossil/k...21_01.html


 
This is very interesting. As far I know the only large cat that lived in Japan was Panthera palaeosinensis. This cat was previously clasified as a "tiger" but latter studies showed that it was more like a different species related with lions and leopards.

Can you translate it?
 

 


I don't speak Japanese, but does this Panthera paleosinensis still existed in the late Pleistocene era?

These big cat fossils were belong to the late Pleistocene.
 
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United States Pckts Offline
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#69

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/envi....cmsJAIPUR: While Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve is facing the problem of plenty with 60 tigers in 392 sq. km, Sariska spread over 866 sq. km houses just nine tigers after the relocation in 2008. Sariska that had lost all its tigers saw hopes of revival with tigers being brought to the reserve from the Ranthambhore reserve after genetic studies undertaken the first time in the country.

Now, a new research by Stanford scholars shows that increasing genetic diversity among the 3,000 or so tiger ..Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/arti...aign=cppst
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#70
( This post was last modified: 06-24-2014, 07:43 PM by peter )

Just before AVA was hacked, I was contacted by someone who intended to join the old forum. As he couldn't join us and saw what was happening, he decided to send me some interesting articles. I'm glad I printed them, as they have interesting information on the tiger in Korea.

I intend to invite him to join us, as he is a wildlife conservationist with access to good information. The problem is the language. Grizzly, can you contact me and help out?
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#71

Unfortunately, i don't speak Korean, and what language he spoke other than English?
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#72
( This post was last modified: 08-28-2014, 05:49 PM by peter )

(06-24-2014, 08:08 PM)'GrizzlyClaws' Wrote: Unfortunately, i don't speak Korean, and what language he spoke other than English?


 

His English is excellent. It's about the adress. It has some signs (I think in Korean) that are not on my desktop. I'll try to copy his mail and send it to you in a pm.

 
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#73
( This post was last modified: 06-24-2014, 08:39 PM by peter )

This is, most unfortunately, only one page of an article written by Won (1966) called 'Some Data of Korean Tiger'. I only was able to print one page, because the computer crashed. Everything I had was largely lost.

Anyhow. This wild male tiger fell into a trap for wild boars in December 1959 in North Hamkyung Province. He was measured and weighed by Dr. Won. Apart from the long tail (97,0 cm.), the tiger, for body length (173,0 cm.), weight (142,0 kg.) and skull (320,00 mm. in greatest total length, 210,00 mm. in zygomatic width and 60,00 mm. for the upper canine (probably measured from the insertion to the tip), compares to a large adult Sumatran male tiger. The hindleg shows he might have been quite tall.




*This image is copyright of its original author
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#74
( This post was last modified: 11-03-2014, 06:34 AM by peter )

What to say about the wild male Korean tiger of 270,5 cm. (just over 8.10) and 142 kg. (314 lbs.) in the previous post? Here's some old photographs (from Baikov) of Korean male tigers:


1 - Young male tiger shot in 1912 in the northern part of Korea by hunter Charaeff. This tiger was 288 lbs. (130,37 kg.):



*This image is copyright of its original author



2 - Another Russian trapper with a male tiger shot in the northern part of Korea in 1912. This male was 10.8 (325,12 cm.) 'over curves' and weighed 361 lbs. (163,75 kg.):
 


*This image is copyright of its original author



3 - Trapper Charaeff again with a tigress of 306 lbs. (138,80 kg.) and a 3-year old male tiger of 324 lbs. (146,97 kg.) he shot near a railway station in the northern part of Korea in 1912 (male at the right):



*This image is copyright of its original author



4 - This is Baikov himself (in the centre) with a male tiger shot in the northern part of Korea in 1911. This tiger, at 560 lbs. (254,0 kg.), is the the heaviest accepted by biologists today:



*This image is copyright of its original author



5 - Compare the 560 lbs. tiger above with the tiger in the photograph below. This tiger was shot in July 1943 near the Sungari River (Manchuria). At 11.6 'over curves', he was 2 inches shorter than the tiger above (see -4-), but the photographs shows a more robust animal. 

Those who shot, measured and moved the Sungari River tiger, all as experienced as they come, thought he was at least 300 kg. (662 lbs.). He was, by far, the largest tiger they had ever seen. There are more reports about wild Amur tigers of this weight, but this is the only one of which a photograph was made. Unreliable as not weighed by a biologist, modern biologists recently concluded. True, but there is this photograph and it shows an animal that easily compares with captive Amur tigers of similar weight.    



*This image is copyright of its original author
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#75
( This post was last modified: 11-28-2015, 04:44 PM by peter )

KOREAN TIGERS

Barclay thought Korean tigers and those living in Manchuria and south-east Russia were one and the same. Korean tigers, however, were somewhat smaller and more reddish in ground colour. 

Man-eating tigers were uncommon in Russia, but it's also true tigers hunted humans when the railroad to Chabarowsk and later Vladivostok was constructed. The problem was of such that work had to be discontinued more than once. Hunters were encouraged to visit the region. One American happened to be close. I'll post his story about a tiger family (male, female and large cubs) with a bad reputation.

In Manchuria, tigers always were considered dangerous. One of the reasons was the locals tied criminals to trees. Alive, if possible. The Jankowski's shot quite a number of man-eaters before World War Two, but some (one of these a big male white tiger) eluded them.

In Korea, tigers had a very bad reputation a century ago. The reason could have been habitat destruction and depletion of prey animals, driving the animals to farms, cattle and, later, humans. Barclay noted people in Manchuria, Russia and Korea feared tigers as much as in India, if not more.

In this post, a few impressions of a century ago.


1 - A painting of Kishi Ganku, probably made during the Japanese occupation (1900-1945).



*This image is copyright of its original author



2 - A painting I saw in an article of R. Neff (2007)



*This image is copyright of its original author



3 - Close to Yablonia Station (Baikov, November 1912):



*This image is copyright of its original author
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