There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Mapusaurus roseae

Canada DinoFan83 Offline
Regular Member
***
#1
( This post was last modified: 08-17-2020, 08:01 PM by DinoFan83 )

Mapusaurus ("Earth lizard") was a giant carnosaurian, Carcharodontosaurid dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous (late Cenomanian to early Turonian stage) of what is now Argentina. Mapusaurus was a large theropod and was roughly similar in size to or larger than its close relative Giganotosaurus, with the largest known individuals estimated at at least 13.55 meters (44.3 feet) long and 10 tonnes (11 short tons) to 10.87 tonnes (11.98 tonnes) in weight. Coria and Currie note the presence of isolated bones from at least one longer individual, but do not provide a figure, instead finding many bones coherent with an individual of comparable size to Giganotosaurus holotype estimated at at least 12.32 metres (41 ft) in length and 7.53 tonnes (8.3 short tons) to 8.17 tonnes (9 short tons) in weight, although not with the same exact proportions, having taller and wider neural spines, a more elongate fibula (86 centimetres (34 in) compared to 83.5 centimetres (32.9 in)) but more slender (81-89% the width as in Giganotosaurus) as well as a wider pubic shaft in minimal dimensions (10% wider as indicated by a 7.8 centimetres (3.1 in) long fragment catalogued as MCF-PVPH-108.145), and with a differently proportioned skull, shorter in length than Giganotosaurus because the maxilla is not elongated (12 teeth compared to 14 in Carcharodontosaurus), but deeper in proportion due to this, as well as narrower (due to the narrow nassals). Considering this, a fragmentary maxilla is coherent with the size of the Giganotosaurus-sized individual (MCF-PVPH-108.169). A neural arch from an axis (MCF-PVPH-108.83) and a scapular blade fragment are also the same exact size as the same elements in Giganotosaurus. The remains of Mapusaurus were discovered in a bone bed containing at least seven individuals of various growth stages Coria and Currie speculated that this may represent a long term, possibly coincidental accumulation of carcasses (some sort of predator trap) and may provide clues about Mapusaurus behavior. Paleontologist Rodolfo Coria, contrary to his published article, repeated in a press-conference earlier suggestions that this congregation of fossil bones may indicate that Mapusaurus hunted in groups and worked together to take down large prey. If so, this would be the first substantive evidence of gregarious behavior by large theropods other than Tyrannosaurus, although whether they might have hunted in organized packs (as wolves do) or simply attacked in a mob, is unknown.
2 users Like DinoFan83's post
Reply

Canada DinoFan83 Offline
Regular Member
***
#2
( This post was last modified: 09-10-2020, 06:13 PM by DinoFan83 )

Mapusaurus by Franoys (note that this is by no means the maximum size for the animal and it could very well be over 3-3.8 tonnes bigger than how Franoys restores it, at 10-10.87 tonnes and 13.55+ meters)

*This image is copyright of its original author


Mapusaurus by NamDaoTetanurae

*This image is copyright of its original author


Mapusaurus mounted skeletons by Kabacchi

*This image is copyright of its original author



Mapusaurus skull by Neloadino

*This image is copyright of its original author


Mapusaurus from Planet Dinosaur

*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like DinoFan83's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB