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Lions of Timbavati

Australia Herekitty Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-08-2018, 12:37 PM by Herekitty )

TINTSWALO SAFARI UPDATE November 2, 2018. Lion sightings have been fantastic as usual with the Mbiris making a number of kills and towards the end of the week. They found an elephant who died of old age and spent a lot of time on the Carcass with the Avoca/Giraffe males. There was copious amounts of meat for all!

The Nharu’s were seen at Dixie dam which is far South of their normal territory. It was only the youngsters and not the 3 adult females - maybe the females have now finally left these youngsters alone for good?

The Young Avoca males have been hanging around with the Talamati females in the South. Up in the North, the Koppies Pride has been doing very well with the Red Road male and are covering large areas through the reserve. Image of young Avoca male by Neil Jennings.

*This image is copyright of its original author

@Pbonz - the two young Timbavati Avocas come from the same pride and have the same mothers as the five Sabi Sands Avocas, but probably different fathers.

The difficulty arises because the old Avoca and Giraffe males are half siblings who were at one time in a coalition together. So when the Avoca fb page states that the young Sabi Avocas were from the Avoca pride and fathered by the old Avoca males, it may have meant the Giraffe males fathered them. Anyone know the answer to this?
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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One of the Black Dam lionesses establishes her place at the table. Image by Riaan Fourie at Thornybush, November 7, 2018

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A cub gets in on the act. Image by Trevor McCall-Peat at Thornybush, November 7, 2018

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The Giraffe male after dominating the kill but not really feeling very hungry. Image by Darrel Camden-Smith at Thornybush, November 6, 2018

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scoping out the scene with a few of his youngsters. Image by Darrel Camden-Smith at Thornybush, November 5, 2018

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Power. Image by Trevor McCall-Peat at Thornybush, November 7, 2018.

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Australia Herekitty Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-09-2018, 12:42 AM by Herekitty )

AndBeyondNgala: Breaking News, November 7, 2018: another white lion cub has been born in Ngala. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

In October Ngala rangers identified a lion den site of one of the young Birmingham (a local lion pride) females in a deep thicket along the dry Timbavati River. andBeyond Ngala has a strict protocol of non-interference around den sites and game viewing of young animals. And in line with this, the newly established den site was observed from a non-intrusive and safe distance.
Using binoculars to observe the den site, speculation among guests and rangers alike grew. How many cubs were there? Was the one cub paler compared to the other two? With the differentiating light and shade within the thicket, no-one was sure. This question would only be answered when the lioness moved her den site.
Earlier this week, ranger Lyle McCabe and his guests enjoyed this opportunity when the Birmingham lioness brought her 3 cubs into the open. It was confirmed. One of the cubs is a white lion. It has happened again!

*This image is copyright of its original author

In March this year a lion from the same Birmingham pride gave birth to four cubs, with one being a white lion cub. Unfortunately there was a male lion coalition territorial take-over and as a result, all the cubs did not survive. However, the cubs born now, in early October, are most likely the offspring of these new dominant male lions. We will have to patiently wait to observe if the current dominant male coalition accepts the cubs as their own. We will try and keep you updated.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*Might be referring to the two Ross males who are currently mating with a number of the Birmingham females.
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Canada Pbonz Offline
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(11-08-2018, 12:54 PM)Herekitty Wrote: AndBeyondNgala: Breaking News, November 7, 2018: another white lion cub has been born in Ngala. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

In October Ngala rangers identified a lion den site of one of the young Birmingham (a local lion pride) females in a deep thicket along the dry Timbavati River. andBeyond Ngala has a strict protocol of non-interference around den sites and game viewing of young animals. And in line with this, the newly established den site was observed from a non-intrusive and safe distance.
Using binoculars to observe the den site, speculation among guests and rangers alike grew. How many cubs were there? Was the one cub paler compared to the other two? With the differentiating light and shade within the thicket, no-one was sure. This question would only be answered when the lioness moved her den site.
Earlier this week, ranger Lyle McCabe and his guests enjoyed this opportunity when the Birmingham lioness brought her 3 cubs into the open. It was confirmed. One of the cubs is a white lion. It has happened again!

*This image is copyright of its original author

In March this year a lion from the same Birmingham pride gave birth to four cubs, with one being a white lion cub. Unfortunately there was a male lion coalition territorial take-over and as a result, all the cubs did not survive. However, the cubs born now, in early October, are most likely the offspring of these new dominant male lions. We will have to patiently wait to observe if the current dominant male coalition accepts the cubs as their own. We will try and keep you updated.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*Might be referring to the two Ross males who are currently mating with a number of the younger Birmingham females - sisters of the Birmingham Boys.
Thank you. This was what i was trying to figure out. So, The Bboys were the males with the first white lion in March that was then killed by the Ross males? Who now have another white cub? Thats spectacular
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United States Peteporker Offline
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Pbonz Wrote:
Herekitty Wrote:AndBeyondNgala: Breaking News, November 7, 2018: another white lion cub has been born in Ngala. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

In October Ngala rangers identified a lion den site of one of the young Birmingham (a local lion pride) females in a deep thicket along the dry Timbavati River. andBeyond Ngala has a strict protocol of non-interference around den sites and game viewing of young animals. And in line with this, the newly established den site was observed from a non-intrusive and safe distance.
Using binoculars to observe the den site, speculation among guests and rangers alike grew. How many cubs were there? Was the one cub paler compared to the other two? With the differentiating light and shade within the thicket, no-one was sure. This question would only be answered when the lioness moved her den site.
Earlier this week, ranger Lyle McCabe and his guests enjoyed this opportunity when the Birmingham lioness brought her 3 cubs into the open. It was confirmed. One of the cubs is a white lion. It has happened again!

*This image is copyright of its original author

In March this year a lion from the same Birmingham pride gave birth to four cubs, with one being a white lion cub. Unfortunately there was a male lion coalition territorial take-over and as a result, all the cubs did not survive. However, the cubs born now, in early October, are most likely the offspring of these new dominant male lions. We will have to patiently wait to observe if the current dominant male coalition accepts the cubs as their own. We will try and keep you updated.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*Might be referring to the two Ross males who are currently mating with a number of the younger Birmingham females - sisters of the Birmingham Boys.
Thank you. This was what i was trying to figure out. So, The Bboys were the males with the first white lion in March that was then killed by the Ross males? Who now have another white cub? Thats spectacular
No, the BBoys are not fathers to the white lion cub in March.  I think the father to the white lion cub in March might have been the Old Avoca male and he might have left the Birmingham pride due to pressure from the two Ross males.  The BBoys originated from the Birmingham pride and were sired by the Old Birmingham Males.  Bboys have been in Sabi Sands since 2015 when they ousted the 2 southern Matimbas and took over the Styx and Nkuhuma pride. From there the Bboys moved onto the Torchwood, Kambula and now the loan Tsalala/Marthly lone lioness.
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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@Pbonz male lions are generally named after the pride they come from. The five Birmingham Boys and their three sisters left the natal Birmingham pride four years ago when the northern Matimbas arrived.
http://www.tintswalo.com/safari/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Tintswalo-Safari-Lodge-News-Birmingham-Lions-%E2%80%93-The-rise-of-a-new-coalition-in-the-Manyeleti-May-2015.pdf 
As Peterporker states, the BBoys moved southwest into Sabi Sands, and the sisters are now known as the Nharu Breakaway pride inhabiting the Manyeleti Game Reserve around Tintswalo Lodge. I misspoke earlier stating that the Ross males were mating with the BBoys sisters, they were/are mating with their mothers, the Birmingham pride.
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The Giraffe dam male really taking well to being in charge of the black dam pride. Image by Darrel Camden-Smith at Thornybush, November 8, 2018

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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Ross male at Ngala Tented Camp. Image by Simon Friedlander, November 6, 2018

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A couple of weeks ago the River pride brought down buffalo in Umlani only to be chased off it by the Zebenine pride and the Mbiri males. Here's an excerpt from that event that touches on the young males of the River pride. Credit: Umlani Blog, October 30, 2018. The river pride also made an appearance this month, however brief. After being chased off the buffalo kill by the Mbiris it’s no surprise . The pride has 5 young males that are looking strong and will probably be out for revenge in the coming years.

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Trilogy male, scarred by war, but still alive, still hunting and spreading his seed in the north of Thornybush. Image by Michaela Horvath, November 9, 2018

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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Big maned zigzag scar Mbiri in repose. Image by Sophie Brown in the Klaserie, posted November 5, 2018

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Small maned Mbiri with the Zebenines. Video by Neil Coetzer at Kings Camp, November 12, 2018

Video by Rajeev Ram at Kings Camp, November 9, 2018

Small and large mane Mbiris. Images by Liz Wain at Kambaku, November 11-12, 2018

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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Giraffe male. Video by Andre Fourie at Royal Malewane, November 12, 2018

His sub-adult offspring with the Blackdam pride can also make some noise. Video by Riaan Fourie at Royal Malewane, November 12, 2018
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Birmingham white cub by the Ross males at Ngala. Video and images by Mister Geelong at Ngala, November 11, 2018


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Lions show honey badgers who is boss! The two Birmingham sub-adult lions cautiously and half heartedly chasing two honey badgers.
All animals got away unscathed but the smell secreted by the badgers lingered for what felt like an eternity
. Video by Roan Du Plessis at Ngala, November 12, 2018
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