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Leopard Predation Thread

Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Credits to SabiSabi.

The Kashane male waited patiently for some warthogs to leave their burrow.  His patience paid off as he successfully took down one of the piglets.



‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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United States stoja9 Offline
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Not for sensitive viewers...?  Most overblown disclaimer ever.
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Italy Ngala Online
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From C4 Photo Safaris:
Leopard take down this morning in the Masai Mara on our current Safari! 
Image by Andre Cloete


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Online
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( This post was last modified: 10-14-2017, 08:34 PM by Ngala )

From Sabi Sabi Private Game Reserve:
"This female leopard gave us an amazing sighting as she sprinted off in front of us and caught a gosling off an Egyptian Goose!"

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Online
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From Latest Sightings - Kruger:
Update:
16:32
Leopard climbed back into the tree to its kill
H10, 500m N of the S29 N entrance
Near Lower Sabie
Tinged by the Hotz Family

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Online
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Photo and information credits: Nombekana Safaris and Wildlife Photography
I have just come back from my Self Driven Safari in the Kruger National Park. 
I had the privilege of taking an awesome Singapore family to Kruger. I just love self driven safaris because I am always in control. I can do what I do best and that is find animals for my guests. At times it can be very quite as was at some point with my guests. They were cat people and for them seeing the cats in the wild would make their trip. I remember saying to them that they must be patient with me as I will try and find them. The first day I couldn't find any cats and I only had one more full day to deliver the goods. At night I couldn't sleep and I was planning my route. Once everything was decided I felt good and I remember getting in the car singing to my guests that "I got a feeling that today is gonna be a good day" and indeed the day was magical
. It started with lions on Buffalo kill that David my friend had told me about. They were however sleeping and not doing much as it they were quite full. I decided with the permission from my guests that I would move on and try and find more cats. The road was full of fresh spoor particularly leopard and I remember saying to them that this is a few minutes old. Indeed as I drove down the road tracking this leopard my heart was pounding and from a distance I saw a leopard on the road. I approached slowly but he went off the road and disappeared with no trace. Only myself and One guest managed to see him briefly. I told them this is only the start of the day and more was to come. Thirty minutes later we were blessed with an incredible sighting of 2 cheetah males. They gave us ample time to spend with them until I decided to move on. 
I got to one of my favourite leopard spots and I told my guests to keep a good eye out . I don't like driving with Windows closed in a vehicle as I am unable to listen to the bush but it was already getting very hot and I had to close the windows and turn on the airconditioning in the car. As I came around the corner I noticed some impalas looking intently and as I switched off the car I heard a lot of Alarm calls, they were very strong and persistent . The impalas were looking in the riverbed and I knew it could only be a leoapard. I told my guest that we have a leopard in the vicinity and we must find him. I carefully followed the eyeline of the impalas and I decided to position my vehicle in a position where I thought the leopard would appear and indeed a few minutes later one of my guests shouted Leopard. There she was in all her glory with her tail curled up signifying that her cover had been blown. She walked and disappeared into the thickets. My clients were over the moon . They had finally found their cats but nothing would prepare us for what was to happen in the next few minutes. We spotted another leopard as he made a kill of an impala and this was on of the most incredible things I have ever witnessed in the bush. He made the kill and looked us straight in the eye before disappearing into the thickest. 

I have been incredibly lucky with kills recently and this was my third kill in a space of 30 days. Two lion kills and one leopard kill. 

The bush is one special place. Sometimes it's quite and you don't see much but patience is key. Mother nature has been good toe and my guests. I love making people happy and I am looking forward to the next ten years in the bush with many guests. 

Mother Nature 
NAMASTE.

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Credits to Cheetah Project Mara-Meru.

Recently, while searching for cheetahs we came across a young leopard female, who was hiding at the edge of the ravine above a narrow crossing point, waiting for the chance to hunt.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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United States Fredymrt Offline
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Credits to John lyall
*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Fredymrt Offline
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Credits to Savanna Private Game Reserve

The battle over life and death. Ravenscourt took a big risk going for this very large warthog boar, but the rewards were great
*This image is copyright of its original author
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Italy Ngala Online
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From Londolozi Game Reserve, A Day I Will Never Forget by Guy Brunskill:
"
.....

While all of us sat entranced by the crash, Shadrack, our tracker, was scanning the surrounding area and pulled off an amazing spot of a leopard walking along one of the roads about 500m away. We quickly headed in his direction as it can be incredibly easy to lose sight of these camouflaged creatures in long grass. This was the first leopard sighting my guests had had at Londolozi. We identified the male leopard to be the Torchwood male, which made the sighting all the more special for me as I had never seen this particular leopard before. He is a male who holds territory falling mostly to the west of Londolozi and he was possibly investigating the option of expanding further eastwards. He walked past our vehicle and we followed him for a while, assuming he was on a territorial patrol but moments after that he started moving with a lot more intent and we came to realize he was on the search for something to eat.

The Torchwood male walks along the road, which offers the path of least resistance. This male leopard’s eyes seem lighter to me than his counterparts and are by far the most beautiful I have seen.

*This image is copyright of its original author

He walked up a prominent termite mound to observe the surrounding area, using it as a vantage point to see if there was any potential prey close by.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Leopards are known as crepuscular animals, which means they are most active during dusk and dawn. This is when they do most of their hunting because they have superb nocturnal vision and have a better chance of moving undetected by prey. Their chances of hunting successfully are thus usually better at night and because of the cooler temperatures they use less energy. We were all intrigued to know if anything had happened despite the heat of the day though, so we headed back to see if we could find him during our afternoon drive.

This is where we all got to see something none of us were expecting…

When we found him, he had in fact made a kill. It was what he had made that startled us so much.

Can you spot the dead animal? The Torchwood male rests in the top of the tree during the afternoon warmth, knowing he has a secure meal less than 2m away from him in the fork (top right of the picture).

*This image is copyright of its original author

Yes, your eyes are not deceiving you. That’s an aardvark up in the tree! The look on my guests faces when they realized it was an aardvark said it all. It was a first for all of us, with none of us having seen an aardvark alive before, let alone one that had been hoisted into a tree by a leopard. Aardvarks, a strange looking creature that feeds on ants and termites, are nocturnal animals which are very rarely seen. Guides go many years in the bush without seeing these elusive creatures and now we had both an aardvark and a leopard in the same sighting. Although we felt rather sorry for the caught and now-deceased animal, it was incredibly exciting at the same as it was the furtherest thing from what we expected.

After watching him rest for a while, our patience paid off as the Torchwood male stood up, looked towards the aardvark and moved towards it to feed.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Aardvarks are certainly not small animals and can weight between 50-60kg and live for about 20 years. Their diet is comprised mainly of ants and termites.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Leopards are often seen feeding on only some parts of the intestines. Here he is feeding on a portion of them, ensuring there is nothing wasted as these predators are never sure when their next meal will be.

*This image is copyright of its original author

We all sat in awe as this leopard fed on the aardvark. In all likelihood, due to the nocturnal nature of aardvarks, the leopard made this kill the night before and returned to it after a morning of territorial patrol. Interestingly enough he had not fed on much of it though. After watching him feeding for roughly 30minutes, we began to question why there weren’t any hyenas around the base of the tree trying to scavenge pieces potentially dropping to the ground. It wasn’t a minute after we’d uttered the words that the Torchwood male lifted his head and gazed inquisitively past our vehicle where a hyena had just appeared.

The male leopard briefly stops feeding and stares behind us to identify what animal is approaching him.

*This image is copyright of its original author

With three spotted hyenas approaching at high speed and calling, the Torchwood male gave off a hissing snarl to try and scare them away.

*This image is copyright of its original author

It just goes to show that whilst on safari you never know what is going to happen or what awaits you around the next corner. I just hope the next time I see an aardvark, it will be under different circumstances though."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Portugal Michael Offline
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(11-19-2017, 01:50 AM)Ngala Wrote: From Londolozi Game Reserve, A Day I Will Never Forget by Guy Brunskill:
"
.....

While all of us sat entranced by the crash, Shadrack, our tracker, was scanning the surrounding area and pulled off an amazing spot of a leopard walking along one of the roads about 500m away. We quickly headed in his direction as it can be incredibly easy to lose sight of these camouflaged creatures in long grass. This was the first leopard sighting my guests had had at Londolozi. We identified the male leopard to be the Torchwood male, which made the sighting all the more special for me as I had never seen this particular leopard before. He is a male who holds territory falling mostly to the west of Londolozi and he was possibly investigating the option of expanding further eastwards. He walked past our vehicle and we followed him for a while, assuming he was on a territorial patrol but moments after that he started moving with a lot more intent and we came to realize he was on the search for something to eat.

The Torchwood male walks along the road, which offers the path of least resistance. This male leopard’s eyes seem lighter to me than his counterparts and are by far the most beautiful I have seen.

*This image is copyright of its original author

He walked up a prominent termite mound to observe the surrounding area, using it as a vantage point to see if there was any potential prey close by.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Leopards are known as crepuscular animals, which means they are most active during dusk and dawn. This is when they do most of their hunting because they have superb nocturnal vision and have a better chance of moving undetected by prey. Their chances of hunting successfully are thus usually better at night and because of the cooler temperatures they use less energy. We were all intrigued to know if anything had happened despite the heat of the day though, so we headed back to see if we could find him during our afternoon drive.

This is where we all got to see something none of us were expecting…

When we found him, he had in fact made a kill. It was what he had made that startled us so much.

Can you spot the dead animal? The Torchwood male rests in the top of the tree during the afternoon warmth, knowing he has a secure meal less than 2m away from him in the fork (top right of the picture).

*This image is copyright of its original author

Yes, your eyes are not deceiving you. That’s an aardvark up in the tree! The look on my guests faces when they realized it was an aardvark said it all. It was a first for all of us, with none of us having seen an aardvark alive before, let alone one that had been hoisted into a tree by a leopard. Aardvarks, a strange looking creature that feeds on ants and termites, are nocturnal animals which are very rarely seen. Guides go many years in the bush without seeing these elusive creatures and now we had both an aardvark and a leopard in the same sighting. Although we felt rather sorry for the caught and now-deceased animal, it was incredibly exciting at the same as it was the furtherest thing from what we expected.

After watching him rest for a while, our patience paid off as the Torchwood male stood up, looked towards the aardvark and moved towards it to feed.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Aardvarks are certainly not small animals and can weight between 50-60kg and live for about 20 years. Their diet is comprised mainly of ants and termites.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Leopards are often seen feeding on only some parts of the intestines. Here he is feeding on a portion of them, ensuring there is nothing wasted as these predators are never sure when their next meal will be.

*This image is copyright of its original author

We all sat in awe as this leopard fed on the aardvark. In all likelihood, due to the nocturnal nature of aardvarks, the leopard made this kill the night before and returned to it after a morning of territorial patrol. Interestingly enough he had not fed on much of it though. After watching him feeding for roughly 30minutes, we began to question why there weren’t any hyenas around the base of the tree trying to scavenge pieces potentially dropping to the ground. It wasn’t a minute after we’d uttered the words that the Torchwood male lifted his head and gazed inquisitively past our vehicle where a hyena had just appeared.

The male leopard briefly stops feeding and stares behind us to identify what animal is approaching him.

*This image is copyright of its original author

With three spotted hyenas approaching at high speed and calling, the Torchwood male gave off a hissing snarl to try and scare them away.

*This image is copyright of its original author

It just goes to show that whilst on safari you never know what is going to happen or what awaits you around the next corner. I just hope the next time I see an aardvark, it will be under different circumstances though."
What is he eating in the sixth picture is that part of the intestine or is that an aardvark fetus ?
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