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Jaguars of Brazil - Dynamics,Lifestyle,Datas,Studies,Reports

Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-10-2020, 07:00 PM by Dark Jaguar )

(07-10-2020, 06:30 PM)OncaAtrox Wrote: @Dark Jaguar amazing compilation of information! It's very interesting to know that horse predation might be easier for jaguars than tapir, this is why I was so surprised to find out that jaguars aren't targeting wild horses in los Llanos that at least we know of, I'm inclined to believe that their difference choice of habitat might be the reason why. 

The dynamics between the jaguars of Brazil and the ones from Colombia and Venezuela seem different overall, although predation on adult domestic horses has been documented in Colombia too.

Your post also exemplified how much jaguars will take advantage of big ungulate prey when they have access to it which serves as a remnant of their prehistoric past.


@"OncaAtrox"

Indeed I also noticed that difference on their predatory behavior between the brazilian ones and llanos ones towards preys, the Llanos ones probably are already fulfilled with what they got on preys and won't bother the wild/domestic horses however the brazilian ones are tricky and what surprises me the most is that even with good enviorment and abundance of natural preys some jaguars from here will still go for the domestic horses, we never get their behavior completely, that's what fascinates me the most about them. And its interesting the adult domestic horses predations in Colombia too. We never know what a jaguar is thinking.
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Balam Offline
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@Dark Jaguar there is however a possibility that jaguars in Los Llanos used to predate of feral horse and cattle a few centuries ago. I have read quite a lot on the history of the mass ranching in the area, and before it was established as the main source of income, horses had been introduced by Spanish settlers who later abandoned them at least 500 years ago, this created a large populations of at least 300,000 wild horses in Venezuela alone, estimated. I wonder if during that time predation on horses was common among jaguars as there weren't ranchers to kill them for it or keep the horses housed in closed areas. And if that is the case, I wonder the sizes those jaguars could've achieved during that period of time where they had access to large and plentiful ungulate prey without limitations.

Jaguars from los Llanos started getting mass hunted about two centuries ago and that must've had a toll on the health of the population, but right before that, their morphology and ecology as it relates to their hunting pattern of introduced large feral ungulates is a mystery.
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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@"OncaAtrox"

Thats amazing information thanks I actually wondered how those wild horses ended up there, haha thanks.

I believe Llanos jaguars predated these animals including feral horses in the past. Like you said they must've been massive, its no wonder there are many black and white pics from the past with extremely big animals. The largest ones will be the first to get shot, so the elder the pics and registrations the larger the animals we might find searching from old hunting records but it has to be ancient haha.




Anyways I just watched a Podcast interview with Leandro last night and he said the idea of reintroducing the orphan cerrado jaguars in the wild wasn't his, it was IBAMA's idea, it happened in 2009 Leandro didn't like animals in captivity neither he had sanctuary back then and he was working just on the field capturing wild jaguars and maned wolves and collaring them, IBAMA Insisted him to keep the orphan cerrado cubs ( Xavante, Kyra and Maya ) he was against the idea in the beginning cause he knew it wouldn't work cause the cubs already created a bond with humans but IBAMA insisted alot.

here's the video on what he says about it.










By the way Did you watch the documentary of Lenda?? I am still waiting your feedback about it hehe.




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Balam Offline
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@Dark Jaguar I'm watching it right now, I'll reply back with my thoughts by the end of the day  Lol
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Balam Offline
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(07-10-2020, 07:45 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: @"OncaAtrox"

Thats amazing information thanks I actually wondered how those wild horses ended up there, haha thanks.

I believe Llanos jaguars predated these animals including feral horses in the past. Like you said they must've been massive, its no wonder there are many black and white pics from the past with extremely big animals. The largest ones will be the first to get shot, so the elder the pics and registrations the larger the animals we might find searching from old hunting records but it has to be ancient haha.




Anyways I just watched a Podcast interview with Leandro last night and he said the idea of reintroducing the orphan cerrado jaguars in the wild wasn't his, it was IBAMA's idea, it happened in 2009 Leandro didn't like animals in captivity neither he had sanctuary back then and he was working just on the field capturing wild jaguars and maned wolves and collaring them, IBAMA Insisted him to keep the orphan cerrado cubs ( Xavante, Kyra and Maya ) he was against the idea in the beginning cause he knew it wouldn't work cause the cubs already created a bond with humans but IBAMA insisted alot.

here's the video on what he says about it.










By the way Did you watch the documentary of Lenda?? I am still waiting your feedback about it hehe.




I watched it! It was a fascinating documentary but also very insightful in regards to the dire and delicate situation the Cerrado is currently in. It was impressive to see Lenda pull on that cattle kill and see how she was able to break the cow's skull. I also loved how much they emphasized the importance of corridors between the Amazon and the Cerrado to ensure a good flow of genes between jaguars populations. The killing of her cubs by allegedly their own father was surprising as well.

I really do hope that with time and the work that people like Leandro are doing in bringing awareness to the conservation of jaguars in the biome we will be able to preserve the jaguars and fauna across human and agricultural settlements.
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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@"OncaAtrox"

I'm glad you watched it.


Lenda could've dragged that big carcass away, but as we already knew it was very tied up.


Do you think they weighed Lenda?



The dead cubs is the reason I feel worried about Ariane's cubs as we know there's a possible threat in the area.


And I think very soon her cubs will start to get out of the burrow already to follow Ariane around to learn the dynamics in the area.  


The moment when they found that dead melanistic old cerrado jaguar was quite shocking, he was hung and disemboweled, the poachers were about to take his fur off. Very disgusting act.


Yeah the Araguaya river is very important its the link that connects Cerrado and Amazon the 2 largest biomes in the country and it works as ecological corridors for jaguars and other species.


When cerrado jaguars get really pushed out by humans towards that side the Araguaya river will work as a escape for them to go all the way to Amazon just like Lenda did, and once those jaguars venture into the Amazon, they will never be seen again.



by the way Crawshaw already responded me regarding the Tiago's death case.

He was already aware of this situation and watched the IOP videos.

Then I asked ''is that very common for territorial male jaguars to go all out in one single battle to the death where only one will come out victorious and possibly feeding on its fallen foe corpse?''

He said:

''I don't think these type of fights are common but they can happen. And cannibalism with jaguars also occurs''




@Pckts

Amazing post above. Like
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Balam Offline
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@Dark Jaguar I believe they most likely weighed her but you know how IOP is with releasing weight measurements. I'm just amazed at how long of a distance she must have had to cross to reach the Amazon from the Cerrado, it's almost hard to believe.
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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@OncaAtrox

Thats how important the Araguaya river is for the enviornmemt, its the only longer corridor left which can take animals naturally from both biomes without crossing paths with humans like cities, urban areas, things like that.

By the way Xavante, Kyra and Maya were found by the Araguaya river by IBAMA as orphan wild cubs.
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-11-2020, 08:05 PM by Dark Jaguar )

Amazing rare sighting of a jaguar approaching capybara in Fazenda San Francisco - South Pantanal.

@OncaAtrox That capybara ran right at moment but the funny thing is the bird on top of it haha.




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Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-12-2020, 12:13 AM by Dark Jaguar )

The very famous Ariane wild Cerrado female back when she was still pregnant and before her capture.


Leandro Silveira

February 2020

''Good morning! Look who came to visit IOP again, this beautiful and healthy pregnant female. She comes to the trap but doesn't take the bait. The big mom is too smart and too wary to fall for it.''




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Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-12-2020, 04:17 PM by Dark Jaguar )

In the Brazilian Amazon jaguars conflicts with humans are more due to small domestic animals predation. Like dogs.


Sad report which is the reality in the area.

http://ipevs.org.br/blog/?tag=onca

Amazonic male Jaguar is killed after predating on female dog in FUNAI base in Acre- Brazil.

August 2011.

A sertanist who studies isolated tribes recorded what happened this Tuesday.

The region is the same one where PF ( brazilian federal police ) arrested a Portuguese trafficker in the beginning of the month.

A jaguar was shot by men from the National Security Force and the National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) on the night of Tuesday (24) after invading and killing a dog from the Ethno-environmental Protection Front of the foundation in Feijó (AC) near the border of Brazil with Peru.

"And then they think that we who work in the forest should walk unarmed. Look who killed a dog in the doorway here at the base this Tuesday. Besides the drug dealers he still has those small animals. Anybody in good conscience want to live here without a gun? Or should we call IBAMA or FUNAI when the jaguar comes home?" said sertanista José Carlos dos Reis Meirelles.''

The region is the same one where the Federal Police (PF) arrested a Portuguese trafficker earlier this month. FUNAI had reported an armed group coming from Peru was circling the region where isolated indigenous people live in the surroundings of the Envira River in western Acre.


Amazonic jaguar had just attacked a bitch in FUNAI base, in Acre (Photo: Personal Archive/José Carlos dos Reis Meirelles)


*This image is copyright of its original author



Blood trail left by the jaguar after attacking a FUNAI female dog (Photo: Personal file/José Carlos dos Reis Meirelles)


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-15-2020, 07:01 PM by Dark Jaguar )

Jaguar Durability.

Young male cub managed to survive possible attack of dominant male jaguar in Refúgio Ecológico Caiman - South Pantanal - Brazil.

He is son of Yara female and was seen feeding on a kill with deep gashes on its neck made by canines.






Posted by adamoncafari on 09/16/2013

''The other evening the members of the Projeto Onçafari team were treated to one of the most magical sights. In the morning we had managed to track down a jaguar, finding where he killed a cow. The cat was not at the carcass, but there was still plenty of meat left. We decided to retreat back to camp, during the heat of the day, and then return after dark.

As the sun set on another magical day in the Pantanal, so we got into the car and made our way out into the ever-drying swamps. The jaguar had beaten us to it. We arrived at the carcass to find a young male feverishly eating away at the meat. He was so hungry that he barely acknowledged our presence.

We were able to identify him as “Yara’s Cub”. Of course, as the video and pictures clearly show, this is by no means a cub. The name just stuck. His mother is Yara, one of the oldest jaguars being viewed by the habituation team. We believe her to be in the region of 13-14 years old! Yara’s Cub was born mid way through last year. It is incredible when one sees how large and how quickly these jaguars grow. What is also wonderful to see is how relaxed he was. If ever we wanted proof that the habituation process was working…this was it.''


In this picture you can clearly see the pronounced bite marks. We believe that these injuries were sustained in a fight with the large resident male of the area.


*This image is copyright of its original author



He fed for close on half an hour. We were able to slowly move closer and closer until we were parked a mere 15 meters from this spectacular animal.


*This image is copyright of its original author




His facial features helped us to identify him as a young male jaguar, believed to have been born in August 2012.


*This image is copyright of its original author



Hard to believe that this jaguar is roughly 14 months old.


*This image is copyright of its original author



VIDEO





Written, filmed and photographed by Adam Bannister




NOTE: I just managed to ID this young male and he happens to be Yvo male. Its been so long I haven't seen him and I didn't even get to see him as a fully grown adult. For a young cub the competition in the area was very tough, no wonder he wasn't too habituated in the monitored area sadly. But he was a very tough boy.
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Italy Spalea Offline
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Christopher Ang: " I’ve been photographing the mighty Jaguars since 2017. Where I’ve returned to the Wetlands of the Pantanal every year (until Covid19) to Photograph the enchanting Jaguar. A new paper published June 2, 2020 by the journal ‘Conservation Biology’ finds that from 2012 to early 2018 in Central and South America, more than 800 jaguars were killed for their teeth, skins, and skulls to be smuggled to South-East Asia as well as China.

Unfortunately, “the illegal trade in Jaguars is growing, and is likely linked to increased Chinese Investments in Central & South America. “ reports National Geographic.
Let’s STOP the Wild Animal Trade Forever go to My Profile (click the Website) to sign the PETITION of :
@world_animal_protectection @worldanimalprotectionus
To END WILD ANIMAL TRADE FOREVER. "


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Balam Offline
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@Dark Jaguar and others who may understand Portuguese or want to see the footage.

There was a recent report done on the jaguars from Southern Pantanal from the Pousada Aguapé which is the same site where the large female and the large male I posted some time ago were recorded. The female was featured in the report and according to them, she killed the cow-calf and dragged the carcass several meters from inside its enclosure into the forest to consume it, a real show of strength.

They spoke about how restrictions are being lifted in regards to COVID-19 and they hope to see an increase in tourism into the area. Some good news stated in the report was that the number of jaguars sighting in the area have increased progressively through the years, and at least 15 individuals have been identified around it.

At the end of the video, they showed footage of a large and powerful female who was crossing alongside a pathway and then a bridge on top of the marsh. I'm not sure if this is the same female as the one from the calf video, but either way, she has a very impressive frame. 


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


It's safe to say that the jaguars in that area are quite big and healthy (I'm still waiting on more footage of that impressive male I keep talking about), but most importantly it's nice to see areas of Pantanal continuously showing signs of improvement in jaguar conservation and utilizing it to increase the economy through ecotourism.

Full report:




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