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Jaguar Predation

Pckts Offline
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Canada Balam Offline
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White-tailed deer kill at the rewilding center of Jaguars Into The Wild Foundation, Mexico.
Can't wait to see this predation get recorded in the wild as well.


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By panterinha_intothewild
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Pckts Offline
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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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Skull of a large Tapir predated by Fantasma male.

onçafari

''Tapir skull. This skull belonged to a very large tapir that was hunted by Fantasma, one of the largest male jaguars here at the Caiman Refuge.''


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Fantasma (Ghost)


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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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3 Jaguars on a carcass at Fazenda Caiman - South Pantanal

Onçafari & CENAP/ICMBio camera traps


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*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



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*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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Scraps of a carcass of what appears to be an Armadillo left by Xangô cerrado male.

credits: Cristina Gianni


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*This image is copyright of its original author





Xangô

credits: Douglas Santos

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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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From: Ecología del jaguar

https://www.researchgate.net/publication...del_jaguar


Figure 2. Collared peccary skull preyed on by an adult jaguar in the Biosphere Reserve Sierra del Abra Tanchipa.


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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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FROM: First documented predation of a Baird’s tapir by a jaguar in the Calakmul region, Mexico.



''Dead female juvenile Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii) found in the communal land (ejido) Nuevo Becal in the Calakmul region, Campeche, Mexico.''


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LEFT: ''Female juvenile Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii) beginning to be eaten by a jaguar in a similar way to other prey.''

RIGHT: ''Picture of the carcass of a sheep showing how a jaguar attacks and devours its prey.''



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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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From: MANUAL OF IDENTIFICATION, PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF PREDATION BY CARNIVORES

''Carcasses predated by jaguars almost always have a bite on the base of the skull (behind the ears) or on the neck area, crushing it or breaking vertebrae (Figure 7). However, the death itself most often (in adults) tends to be caused by the breaking of the neck from the impact of the fall. In many cases the head of the preyed animal is turned backwards. The carcass is rarely killed by suffocation with a bite to the throat.''


Figure 7 - Adult horse with lesion at the base of the skull, typical feature of jaguar attack.

photo: CENAP'S Archive

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''Another characteristic of carcasses preyed on by jaguars is that the jaguar begins to consume the carcass from the anterior portion, starting to feed on the face and neck, and then moving to the chest region (Figure 8). The lower part of the neck and the chest commonly known as the "bleeder" is the favorite part of the carcass. It is common for the hind parts (after the ribs) to be left intact. On the other hand, calves are fully consumed, including the head and legs.''


Figure 8 - Buffalo preyed by jaguar, which usually start feeding from the pectoral region.

photo: Maria Renata Pereira Leite Pitman

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Acinonyx sp. Offline
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Kill rates and predation patterns of jaguars (Panthera onca) in the southern Pantanal, Brazil

Abstract

Jaguars (Panthera onca) often prey on livestock, resulting in conflicts with humans. To date, kill rates and predation patterns by jaguars have not been well documented. We studied the foraging ecology of jaguars in an area with both livestock and native prey and documented kill rates, characteristics of prey killed, patterns of predation, and the influence of prey size on the duration at kill sites and the time interval between kills. Between October 2001 and April 2004 we monitored 10 jaguars equipped with global positioning system (GPS) collars. We collected 11,787 GPS locations and identified 1,105 clusters of locations as sites of concentrated use (e.g., kill sites, bed sites, and dens). Of these, we found prey remains at 415 kill sites and documented 438 prey items. Kills were composed of 31.7% cattle (9.8% adults and 21.9% calves), 24.4% caiman (Caiman crocodilus yacare), 21.0% peccaries (mostly Tayassu pecari), 4.1% feral hogs (Sus scrofa), 3.9% marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus), 3.2% giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), 2.0% capybaras (Hydrochoeris hydrochaeris), 1.6% brocket deer (Mazama americana and M. gouazoubira), and other avian, mammalian, and reptilian species. Individual jaguars differed in the proportion of each species they killed and the proportion of native prey versus cattle. Although all 10 cats killed cattle, 5 killed a high proportion of cattle (>35% of kills), and 3 killed few cattle (<15%). Males (27%) and females (35%) killed cattle in similar proportions. In contrast, male jaguars killed a higher proportion of peccaries than did females, and female jaguars killed more caiman than did males. The mean kill rate for all jaguars was 4.3 days ± 4.4 SD between known consecutive kills. The time interval to the next subsequent kill by jaguars increased with increasing prey size. Jaguars also increased the length of time at a carcass as prey size increased. Jaguar kill rates on peccaries steadily increased over the 4-year study. In contrast, kill rates on cattle decreased during the same period. Rainfall, and subsequent water levels on the Pantanal, was the main driver of seasonal kill rates by jaguars on cattle and caiman. As water levels increased, predation on caiman increased as caiman became more distributed throughout the landscape. Conversely, as water levels fell, caiman became less plentiful, and cattle were moved out into pastures thereby increasing their availability to more jaguars.


Distribution of 438 prey (number of kills [n] with percentage of kills in parentheses) found at 415 kill sites for 10 radiocollared jaguars, November 2001–April 2004, in the southern Pantanal, Brazil.

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Acinonyx sp. Offline
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JAGUAR TAKES DOWN VULTURE IN INCREDIBLY RARE MID-AIR BATTLE


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https://www.storytrender.com/67304/jaguar-takes-down-vulture-in-incredibly-rare-mid-air-battle/
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johnny rex Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-20-2021, 04:47 PM by johnny rex )

Are there any photos that show jaguars eat through the osteoderms, especially at the back, of crocodilians? I asked simply because I haven't see photos of jaguars bite a huge chunk out of the back of caimans but only at the rear part of the skull in a single photo that you can easily find in Google Image. I believe a jaguar can bite through the osteoderms on the back of caimans given the powerful jaws but so far haven't see photos of that.
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Italy AndresVida Offline
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https://www.instagram.com/reel/CUC7jCBgR...=copy_link

Badass.. Truly
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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Jaguar with its prey in El Pantanal
Credit to @christianbrunskill

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