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Hybrids

India brotherbear Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 01-29-2019, 09:13 AM by Rishi )




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Poland nobody Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-29-2019, 03:39 AM by nobody )

Tiliger


*This image is copyright of its original author

The tiliger is a hybrid cross between a male tiger (Panthera tigris) and a ligress (which is the hybrid offspring of a male lion and female tiger). The world's first tiligers were born on 16 August 2007 at Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood, Oklahoma.[citation needed]

Although male tigons and ligers are sterile, female hybrids can produce cubs. As with ligers, tiligers grow to a size that is typically larger than either of their tiger and lion fore
bears. Large males can grow up to 400 kg and 3.50 meters in length, while the females may grow up to 250 kg and 3 meters in length.





Tiliger Male vs Tigress
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India brotherbear Offline
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This is interesting although hybrids serve no purpose. ( that I know of ).
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Finland Shadow Offline
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(01-29-2019, 04:16 AM)brotherbear Wrote: This is interesting although hybrids serve no purpose. ( that I know of ).

Well, at least we can see what it looks like if big cat is 400 kg. Comparing these hybrids to other big cats we can all make our estimations, if 400 kg tigers in past are realistic weights or exaggerations. It would be very interesting to see comparisons what comes to skulls and bones etc. I think, that some hybrids have died already in old age.
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India brotherbear Offline
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(01-29-2019, 04:27 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(01-29-2019, 04:16 AM)brotherbear Wrote: This is interesting although hybrids serve no purpose. ( that I know of ).

Well, at least we can see what it looks like if big cat is 400 kg. Comparing these hybrids to other big cats we can all make our estimations, if 400 kg tigers in past are realistic weights or exaggerations. It would be very interesting to see comparisons what comes to skulls and bones etc. I think, that some hybrids have died already in old age.

Perhaps too, if these captive cats were allowed proper exercise and fed on a healthy diet, we might learn of the physical capabilities of the huge Pleistocene cats of a similar size.
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Belgium Luipaard Offline
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Leopard-jaguar hybrid:


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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A rare wild hybrid, a cross between the red lechwe and waterbuck

https://africageographic.com/blog/a-wild...-botswana/




*This image is copyright of its original author
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-01-2019, 06:18 PM by BorneanTiger )

(01-29-2019, 04:16 AM)brotherbear Wrote: This is interesting although hybrids serve no purpose. ( that I know of ).

As mentioned elsewhere, in 2017, the Cat Specialist Group recognised only 2 subspecies of lions, like they did with tigers and other felids, but the defined subspecies of lions (the Northern Panthera leo leo (including the Asiatic, Barbary and West African lions), and the Southern Panthera leo melanochaita in Eastern and Southern Africa) apparently overlap in Ethiopia or Northeast Africa, at least, which could lead to hybridisationbetween the Northern and Southern subspecies. This is a potential taxonomic headache for the CSG, because subspecies are supposed to be geographically and genetically distinct from each other (Study.com): https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-genetic...list-grouphttps://wildfact.com/forum/topic-north-e...ican-lions

Abyssinian lion at New York Zoological Gardens, 1914: https://archive.org/stream/annualreportn...6/mode/1up

Northern subspecies (Panthera leo leo),
Southern subspecies (Panthera leo melanochaita), or
hybrid (Panthera leo leo × Panthera leo melanochaita)?


*This image is copyright of its original author
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-01-2019, 11:35 AM by Rishi )

On 22 May 2017, Karl Shuker, author and cryptozoologist in England, discovered this long lost photograph of an extraordinary hybrid cat. Cubanacan, the progeny of a lion and a tigon [tiger x lioness] was born at the Alipore Zoo in Kolkata, India, on 7 March 1979, and was the only surviving cub of his litter of three.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Cubanacan as portrayed in the 1985 Guinness Book of Records.
Alipore Zoo, Kolkata

Alipore Zoo
had embarked on a fifteen-year endeavour to hybridise lions and tigers, an effort that created Cubanacan’s tigon mother, Rudrani, and her sister, Rangini, several years earlier. A pioneering scientific success for India, and even the rest of the world, Cubanacan was widely regarded as the first litigon born in the world.

*This image is copyright of its original author

A depiction of Cubanacan’s tigon mother, Rudrani, approaching his lion father, Devabrata. From 100 Years of Calcutta Zoo (1875-1975).
The Centenary Celebration Committee, Zoological Garden, Alipore, Calcutta (1975)
 

*This image is copyright of its original author

A captioned photograph of the litigon Cubanacan, published in The Statesman, Calcutta (now Kolkata) on 12 March 1980.
However, a record from 1943 indicates a successful mating between a fifteen-year-old lion-tiger and a lion at the Munich Hellabrunn Zoo to produce a female cub. Even so, Cubanacan’s remarkable genetic makeup sparked interest and enthusiasm in India and around the globe. The fascination with hybrid cats continued as Rudrani produced four more litigons in subsequent years.
There is now evidence that these experiments were led by a scientific quest to determine if hybrids could be fertile, a question that struck at the heart of the notion of biological species. At the time, the very definition of species hinged on reproductive isolation.  Though probing at a research question, concerns surfaced about artificially creating animals not found in the wild as freaks for public curiosity. There were also claims of animal cruelty during the process, an allegation that has come to the forefront in the current effort to ban cross breeding of big cats in the United States.

*This image is copyright of its original author

In the weeks following his birth, The Statesman ran articles about Cubanacan.
In the midst of this controversy, hybrids still command ample public attention. The 2017 Guinness World Records (formerly the Guinness Book of Records) ranked, Hercules, a liger [lion x tigress] at the Myrtle Beach Safari in South Carolina, the world’s largest big cat.
Cubanacan was also once the world’s largest big cat, who, according to Guinness in 1985, weighed 363 kg (800 pounds), stood 1.32 m (4.4 inches) at the shoulder and measured 3.5 m (11.6 inches) in length. Given the aversion to hybridisation and the subsequent 1985 ban on cross breeding big cats in India, it appears that Cubanacan’s memory was purposely forgotten.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unspecified photographs of a tigon and a litigon, published in the Guidebook to Calcutta Zoo, A Dunlop Presentation, with legends whitened. Presumably, this was an effort to prevent proper identification of the taxa in the years after cross breeding became illegal. Exact publisher & publication date unknown, but circumstantially the photographs date to between 1992 and 1995.
The hybridisation debate in biology is important. So is the current proposal on banning big cat hybridisation in the US, and it is in the light of this controversy that Cubanacan’s photograph is being preserved for posterity as a valuable item in wildlife history, best viewed without value judgement.

http://blogs.nature.com/indigenus/2017/0...tigon.html
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-01-2019, 11:37 AM by Rishi )

(11-01-2019, 09:17 AM)Sully Wrote: On 22 May 2017, Karl Shuker, author and cryptozoologist in England, discovered this long lost photograph of an extraordinary hybrid cat. Cubanacan, the progeny of a lion and a tigon [tiger x lioness] was born at the Alipore Zoo in Kolkata, India, on 7 March 1979, and was the only surviving cub of his litter of three.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Cubanacan as portrayed in the 1985 Guinness Book of Records.
Alipore Zoo, Kolkata

Alipore Zoo
had embarked on a fifteen-year endeavour to hybridise lions and tigers, an effort that created Cubanacan’s tigon mother, Rudrani, and her sister, Rangini, several years earlier. A pioneering scientific success for India, and even the rest of the world, Cubanacan was widely regarded as the first litigon born in the world.

*This image is copyright of its original author

A depiction of Cubanacan’s tigon mother, Rudrani, approaching his lion father, Devabrata. From 100 Years of Calcutta Zoo (1875-1975).
The Centenary Celebration Committee, Zoological Garden, Alipore, Calcutta (1975)
 

*This image is copyright of its original author

A captioned photograph of the litigon Cubanacan, published in The Statesman, Calcutta (now Kolkata) on 12 March 1980.
However, a record from 1943 indicates a successful mating between a fifteen-year-old lion-tiger and a lion at the Munich Hellabrunn Zoo to produce a female cub. Even so, Cubanacan’s remarkable genetic makeup sparked interest and enthusiasm in India and around the globe. The fascination with hybrid cats continued as Rudrani produced four more litigons in subsequent years.
There is now evidence that these experiments were led by a scientific quest to determine if hybrids could be fertile, a question that struck at the heart of the notion of biological species. At the time, the very definition of species hinged on reproductive isolation.  Though probing at a research question, concerns surfaced about artificially creating animals not found in the wild as freaks for public curiosity. There were also claims of animal cruelty during the process, an allegation that has come to the forefront in the current effort to ban cross breeding of big cats in the United States.

*This image is copyright of its original author

In the weeks following his birth, The Statesman ran articles about Cubanacan.
In the midst of this controversy, hybrids still command ample public attention. The 2017 Guinness World Records (formerly the Guinness Book of Records) ranked, Hercules, a liger [lion x tigress] at the Myrtle Beach Safari in South Carolina, the world’s largest big cat.
Cubanacan was also once the world’s largest big cat, who, according to Guinness in 1985, weighed 363 kg (800 pounds), stood 1.32 m (4.4 inches) at the shoulder and measured 3.5 m (11.6 inches) in length. Given the aversion to hybridisation and the subsequent 1985 ban on cross breeding big cats in India, it appears that Cubanacan’s memory was purposely forgotten.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unspecified photographs of a tigon and a litigon, published in the Guidebook to Calcutta Zoo, A Dunlop Presentation, with legends whitened. Presumably, this was an effort to prevent proper identification of the taxa in the years after cross breeding became illegal. Exact publisher & publication date unknown, but circumstantially the photographs date to between 1992 and 1995.
The hybridisation debate in biology is important. So is the current proposal on banning big cat hybridisation in the US, and it is in the light of this controversy that Cubanacan’s photograph is being preserved for posterity as a valuable item in wildlife history, best viewed without value judgement.

http://blogs.nature.com/indigenus/2017/0...tigon.html

Yes, Alipur zoo drew lot of flak due to its hybridization experiments back then.
Photos defunct though.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#11
( This post was last modified: 11-22-2019, 10:15 PM by BorneanTiger )

Jhbinz said in 2012 that s/he "made this encounter this past summer in Yukon Territory while driving between Teslin Lake and Rest Area on Liard River" in Yukon, northwest Canada. What is it, a grizzlyblack bear hybrid?
   
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