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Hillocks, hills, volcanoes and mountains

BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-26-2020, 11:41 PM by BorneanTiger )

Starting a thread for landforms which I'm sure always or regularly catch your attention if you are nearby, with a post about the highest of them all on Earth: Mount Everest

With air pollution levels down during the pandemic, Kathmandu photographer Abhushan Gautam captured a sight that has been shrouded in the city's smog for nearly 50 years — a clear view of Mount Everest: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-...-1.5580607https://thehill.com/changing-america/sus...-120-miles




   
   
   

Istock: 
   
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BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-24-2020, 04:37 PM by BorneanTiger )

@peter I'm sure that you heard that you've heard of this case:

In November last year, KLM flight 685 was supposed to fly from Amsterdam to Mexico City, and though the flight ended up taking around 11 hours as usual, the passengers didn’t end up in Mexico City, rather, they ended up in Amsterdam, right where they started. The Boeing 747-400 operating the flight turned around when it was already over North America, meaning it crossed the Atlantic twice. This was because Mount Popocatépetl or Popōcatepētl (Nahuatl for "Smoking Mountain"), an active stratovolcano in central Mexico erupted, the plane apparently had a cargo of about 2 dozen horses, and diverting to Canada or the USA would have created issues for the passengers, such as the lack of visas upon entry: https://onemileatatime.com/klm-flight-to-nowhere/




Located in the states of Puebla, Morelos and Mexico, in central Mexico, Popocatépetl lies in the eastern half of the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt. At 5,426 m (17,802 ft), it is the second highest peak in Mexico, after Citlaltépetl or Pico de Orizabahttps://volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=341090

Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios (Church of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios) at Cholula, Puebla State, by Comisión Mexicana de Filmaciones (12th of January, 2016):
   

As viewed from Amecameca in Mexico State, looking south-east, by Alejandro Linares Garcia (21st of February, 2010):
   
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BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-24-2020, 04:40 PM by BorneanTiger )

Popocatépetl has a twin to the north which overlooks the Valley of Mexico, that is Iztaccíhuatl or Ixtaccíhuatl (Nahuatl for "White Woman"), or Mujer Dormida (Spanish for "Sleeping Woman"), on the border between the states of Mexico and Puebla, the third highest volcano in Mexico with an altitude of 5,220–5,230 m (17,125.98–17,158.79 ft). Iztaccíhuatl is connected to Popocatépetl by the high saddle known as the "Paso de Cortés", and they are both located in Izta-Popo Zoquiapan National Park, which is named after them: https://web.archive.org/web/201203100239...N=37870244https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley....07/1933367https://simec.conanp.gob.mx/ficha.php?anp=87&=11https://web.archive.org/web/201010272002...ob.mx/sig/

Iztaccíhuatl, as viewed from Amecameca, by Alejandro Linares Garcia (21st of February, 2010):
   

Forshortened view of Iztaccíhuatl (left) and Popocatépetl (right) from the Polanco district of Mexico City, by Jorge Altamirano (18th of January, 2018):
   

Iztaccíhuatl (left) and Popocatépetl (right), by Haakon S. Krohn (24th of January, 2010):
   

There are a number of Aztec-Náhua legends regarding the volcanoes, which surround 2 lovers. One of them is that Iztaccíhuatl was a princess who fell in love with one of her father's warriors, Popocatépetl. The emperor sent Popocatépetl to war in Oaxaca, promising him Iztaccíhuatl as his wife when he returned (which Iztaccíhuatl's father presumed he would not). Iztaccíhuatl was falsely told that Popocatépetl had died in battle, and believing the news, she died of grief. When Popocatépetl returned to find his love dead, he took her body to a spot outside Tenochtitlan and kneeled by her grave. They were then covered with snow, and changed into mountains. Iztaccíhuatl's mountain is called "White Woman" (from Nahuatl iztāc "white" and cihuātl "woman") because it resembles a woman lying on her back, and is often covered with snow — the peak is sometimes nicknamed ''La Mujer Dormida''. Popocatépetl became an active volcano, raining fire on Earth in blind rage at the loss of his beloved: http://www.mexonline.com/history-popo.htmhttps://www.ancient-origins.net/myths-le...end-005779
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( This post was last modified: 08-09-2020, 12:27 AM by BorneanTiger )

Now for the mountains of the Arabian Peninsula, which are shown in this map that I posted in the thread for the Arabian leopard, to an extent: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-arabian...7#pid81977
(05-20-2019, 11:22 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote: I came across this: https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...in-danger/

The Arabian Leopards of Oman by Andrew Spalton and Hadi Al-Hikmani, illustrated by Vicky White. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Geologically, the peninsula is perhaps more appropriately called the "Arabian subcontinent", because it lies on a tectonic plate of its own, that is the Arabian Plate, which has been moving incrementally away from the rest of Africa (forming the Red Sea) and north, toward Asia, into the Eurasian Plate (forming the Zagros Mountains of Southwest Asia, particularly Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey). The rocks exposed vary systematically across Arabia, with the oldest rocks exposed in the Arabian-Nubian Shield near the Red Sea, overlain by earlier sediments that become younger towards the Persian Gulf. Perhaps the best-preserved ophiolite on Earth, the Semail Ophiolite, lies exposed in the Hajar Mountains of the UAE and northern Oman. The peninsula consists of:

A) A central plateau, the Najd, with fertile valleys and pastures used for the grazing of sheep and other livestock

B) A range of deserts: the Nafud in the north, which is stony; Ar-Rub' al-Khali (literally "the Empty Quarter") or the Great Arabian Desert in the south, with sand estimated to extend 600 ft (182.88 m) below the surface; between them, Ad-Dahna' Desert: http://www.wdl.org/en/item/11767/view/1/15/

C) Stretches of dry or marshy coastland with coral reefs on the Red Sea's side (the Tihamah)

D) Oases and marshy coast-land in Eastern Arabia on the side of the Arabian Gulf, the most important of which are those of Al-Ain (in the UAE, on the border with Oman) and Al-Hasah (in Saudi Arabia), according to Marshall Cavendish: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...#v=onepage

E) And of course, mountains at the eastern, southern and northwestern borders of the peninsula. Broadly, the ranges can be grouped as follows: https://books.google.com/books?id=tjXRfqBv_0UC&dq, https://books.google.com/books?id=eQvhZaEVzjcC&pg, https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...#v=onepage

1) Northeast: The Hajar range, shared by the UAE and northern Oman: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...ns&f=false

The Hajar Mountains, as seen from the Emirate of Sharjah, by JSPhotography2016 (7th of December, 2013):
   

2) Southeast: The Dhofar Mountains of southern Oman, contiguous with the Hadhramaut Mountains of eastern Yemen: https://books.google.com/books?id=AH8YAQ...+mountainshttps://books.google.com/books?id=uc_tCA...#v=onepage

The Dhofar Mountains near Salalah, Oman, during the season of al-Khareef (the Monsoon), by Mary Paulose (2006):
   

The seafront of Al-Mukalla, Yemen, at sunset, with Ar-Rawdah Mosque in the right-hand side, and the Hadhramaut Mountains in the background, by Ion Tichy (30th of October, 1992):
   

3) West: Bordering the Tihamah  (eastern coast of the Red Sea) are the Sarat Mountains (or Sarawat), which can be seen to include the Haraz Mountains of eastern Yemen, and the 'Asir and Hijaz Mountains of western Saudi Arabia, with the latter including the Midian (or Madyan) Mountains in northwestern Saudi Arabia: https://books.google.com/books?redir_esc...az&f=false, https://books.google.com/books?id=tjXRfq...at&f=falsehttps://books.google.com/books?id=KmxPAQ...+mountainshttps://books.google.com/books?id=XWwCHW...#v=onepagehttps://books.google.com/books?id=4RvQAg...+mountainshttps://books.google.com/books?id=AH8YAQ...edir_esc=y

Agricultural terraces near At-Tawilah ("The Table"?), in the Haraz Mountains of Yemen, by Bernard Gagnon (7th of August, 1986):
   

Jabal As-Sawdah (thought to be the highest mountain of Saudi Arabia, but not confirmed) of the 'Asir Mountains near the border with Yemen, about 28 km (17.4 miles) from Abha, by Muhammad Sobri (12th of July, 2017):
   

The Hijaz Mountains near the Islamic holy city of Makkah (Mecca), by Muhammed Enes Okullu (18th of August, 2011):
   

The Midian Mountains near 'Alqan, Tabuk Province, near the border, by 'Adel Al-'Omrani (3rd of January, 2013):
   

4) Northwest: Aside from the Sarawat, the northern portion of Saudi Arabia hosts the Shammar Mountains, which include the Aja and Salma Mountains: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...ns&f=false

The Aja Mountains near Jaw, Ha'il Province, by C. V. Hail (21st of July, 2007):
   

5) Central: The Najd hosts the Tuwaiq Escarpment or Tuwair range: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...ns&f=false

People picnicking at the base of the Tuwaiq Escarpment, near the Korean Slope, south-west of Riyadh in the central region of Najd, by Baptiste Marcel (24th of November, 2006):
   
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Netherlands peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-09-2020, 05:47 PM by peter )

BORNEAN TIGER

I never heard anything about flight 685, but I do know a bit about eruptions and old civilisations.  

Some years ago I was in Herculaneum (very close to Napels, Italy) for an afternoon. What I remember most is the development of society back then. I saw a well-planned city, hygiene, labour specialisation, facilities for leisure and, in particular, precautions. They knew about the danger the Vesuvius posed, but were completely surprised in spite of that.   

A day later, I visited the Archeology Museum in Naples. Again, I was suprised by the development of a civilisation only few remember. My dentist was in Herculaneum as well. He was flabberghasted by the tools his peers used so long ago. They really knew their business back then. In a way, it seems like the model they used back then is still in use.    

Nice thread and interesting contributions.
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(08-08-2020, 09:49 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote: Now for the mountains of the Arabian Peninsula, which are shown in this map that I posted in the thread for the Arabian leopard, to an extent: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-arabian...7#pid81977
(05-20-2019, 11:22 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote: I came across this: https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...in-danger/

The Arabian Leopards of Oman by Andrew Spalton and Hadi Al-Hikmani, illustrated by Vicky White. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Geologically, the peninsula is perhaps more appropriately called the "Arabian subcontinent", because it lies on a tectonic plate of its own, that is the Arabian Plate, which has been moving incrementally away from the rest of Africa (forming the Red Sea) and north, toward Asia, into the Eurasian Plate (forming the Zagros Mountains of Southwest Asia, particularly Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey). The rocks exposed vary systematically across Arabia, with the oldest rocks exposed in the Arabian-Nubian Shield near the Red Sea, overlain by earlier sediments that become younger towards the Persian Gulf. Perhaps the best-preserved ophiolite on Earth, the Semail Ophiolite, lies exposed in the Hajar Mountains of the UAE and northern Oman. The peninsula consists of:

A) A central plateau, the Najd, with fertile valleys and pastures used for the grazing of sheep and other livestock

B) A range of deserts: the Nafud in the north, which is stony; Ar-Rub' al-Khali (literally "the Empty Quarter") or the Great Arabian Desert in the south, with sand estimated to extend 600 ft (182.88 m) below the surface; between them, Ad-Dahna' Desert: http://www.wdl.org/en/item/11767/view/1/15/

C) Stretches of dry or marshy coastland with coral reefs on the Red Sea's side (the Tihamah)

D) Oases and marshy coast-land in Eastern Arabia on the side of the Arabian Gulf, the most important of which are those of Al-Ain (in the UAE, on the border with Oman) and Al-Hasah (in Saudi Arabia), according to Marshall Cavendish: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...#v=onepage

E) And of course, mountains at the eastern, southern and northwestern borders of the peninsula. Broadly, the ranges can be grouped as follows: https://books.google.com/books?id=tjXRfqBv_0UC&dq, https://books.google.com/books?id=eQvhZaEVzjcC&pg, https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...#v=onepage

1) Northeast: The Hajar range, shared by the UAE and northern Oman: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...ns&f=false

The Hajar Mountains, as seen from the Emirate of Sharjah, by JSPhotography2016 (7th of December, 2013):

*This image is copyright of its original author


2) Southeast: The Dhofar Mountains of southern Oman, contiguous with the Hadhramaut Mountains of eastern Yemen: https://books.google.com/books?id=AH8YAQ...+mountainshttps://books.google.com/books?id=uc_tCA...#v=onepage

The Dhofar Mountains near Salalah, Oman, during the season of al-Khareef (the Monsoon), by Mary Paulose (2006):

*This image is copyright of its original author


The seafront of Al-Mukalla, Yemen, at sunset, with Ar-Rawdah Mosque in the right-hand side, and the Hadhramaut Mountains in the background, by Ion Tichy (30th of October, 1992):

*This image is copyright of its original author


3) West: Bordering the Tihamah (eastern coast of the Red Sea) are the Sarat Mountains (or Sarawat), which can be seen to include the Haraz Mountains of eastern Yemen, and the 'Asir and Hijaz Mountains of western Saudi Arabia, with the latter including the Midian (or Madyan) Mountains in northwestern Saudi Arabia: https://books.google.com/books?redir_esc...az&f=false, https://books.google.com/books?id=tjXRfq...at&f=falsehttps://books.google.com/books?id=KmxPAQ...+mountainshttps://books.google.com/books?id=XWwCHW...#v=onepagehttps://books.google.com/books?id=4RvQAg...+mountainshttps://books.google.com/books?id=AH8YAQ...edir_esc=y

Agricultural terraces near At-Tawilah ("The Table"?), in the Haraz Mountains of Yemen, by Bernard Gagnon (7th of August, 1986):

*This image is copyright of its original author


Jabal As-Sawdah (thought to be the highest mountain of Saudi Arabia, but not confirmed) of the 'Asir Mountains near the border with Yemen, about 28 km (17.4 miles) from Abha, by Muhammad Sobri (12th of July, 2017):

*This image is copyright of its original author


The Hijaz Mountains near the Islamic holy city of Makkah (Mecca), by Muhammed Enes Okullu (18th of August, 2011):

*This image is copyright of its original author


The Midian Mountains near 'Alqan, Tabuk Province, near the border, by 'Adel Al-'Omrani (3rd of January, 2013):

*This image is copyright of its original author


4) Northwest: Aside from the Sarawat, the northern portion of Saudi Arabia hosts the Shammar Mountains, which include the Aja and Salma Mountains: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...ns&f=false

The Aja Mountains near Jaw, Ha'il Province, by C. V. Hail (21st of July, 2007):

*This image is copyright of its original author


5) Central: The Najd hosts the Tuwaiq Escarpment or Tuwair range: https://books.google.com/books?id=j894mi...ns&f=false

People picnicking at the base of the Tuwaiq Escarpment, near the Korean Slope, south-west of Riyadh in the central region of Najd, by Baptiste Marcel (24th of November, 2006):

*This image is copyright of its original author

Now for the highest mountain in the Arabian Peninsula, Jabal An-Nabi Shu'ayb (meaning "Mountain of the Prophet Shu'ayb") of the Harazi subrange of the Sarawat, which is located near the Yemeni capital city, Sana, within the district of Bani Matar, Governorate of Sana: https://books.google.com/books?id=L4dyDw...&q&f=falsehttps://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_...2.0x000052https://www.mindat.org/feature-72377.htmlhttp://www.peaklist.org/WWlists/ultras/mideast.html, https://books.google.com/books?id=tjXRfq...yb&f=false, https://books.google.com/books?id=eQvhZa...yb&f=falsehttps://peakvisor.com/adm/yemen.html

Measuring about 3,666 m (12,027.56 ft) high, with a prominence of approximately 3,326 m (10,912.07 ft), it is so-called, not because of the Midianite figure who is mentioned in the Qur’an (who was thought to be the Biblical figure Jethro), but because of another Prophet of the same name, that is Shuʿayb ibn Mahdam ibn Dhī-Mahdam al-Ḥaḍūrī, whose tomb is considered by locals to be on the mountain. Also known as "Jabal Hadhur", due to it being located in the region of Mikhlaf Hadhur, it is nearly equidistant from Sana as Jabal Tiyal (Yemen's 2nd highest peak). The mountain may seem like a rocky knoll from observation center, like on the highway from Sana – Al-Hudaydah, but from its western face, it is a massive mountain rising from about 1,500 – 1,600 m (4,921.26 – 5,249.34 ft). This side of the mountain halts clouds burdened with precipitation, causing that side to be relatively fertile. Atop the mountain is a military post with a radar, and what is reportedly the shrine of Shu'ayb: https://books.google.com/books?redir_esc...ume&q=شعيب, https://books.google.com/books?redir_esc...يب&f=falsehttps://books.google.com/books?id=8SsqDg...يب&f=false

In April 2019, Ahmad Zein Al-Yafei from Dubai scaled the mountain in 69 hours. He mentioned that reaching the summit was hard, long and tiring, having to go through low levels of oxygen, air pressure and temperature: https://gulfnews.com/uae/dubai-security-...1.63177391

Franco Pecchio (26th of December, 2006), from Kawkaban to the north of the mountain: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aiace/353668857/
   

Franco Pecchio (28th of December, 2006), from a point to the west of the mountain: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aiace/353667919/https://www.flickr.com/photos/aiace/353667843/
   
   

Bryan-Mestre: https://peakery.com/jabal-an-nabi-shuayb-yemen/
   

Brian J. McMorrow (12th of February, 2005): https://www.pbase.com/image/41332227https://www.pbase.com/image/41332228
   
   
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( This post was last modified: 11-26-2020, 02:51 PM by BorneanTiger )

(06-24-2020, 09:42 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote: Maharashtra reserves a forest for elephants which came from Karnataka State, in the area of Tillari in Sindhudurg District, besides leopards and tigershttps://www.ndtv.com/india-news/maharash...ka-2251137https://indianexpress.com/article/cities...e-6473276/https://www.hindustantimes.com/cities/ma...BntCL.html

A government notification said 2,953.38 hectares of forest land in Sindhudurg would be a "reserved forest" for "conservation of tigerelephant and leopard". The 38-km-long Dodamarg wildlife corridor that connects Radhanagari Wildlife Sanctuary in Maharashtra to Bhimgad Wildlife Sanctuary in Karnataka frequently witnesses elephant and tiger movement.

All India | Reported by Saurabh Gupta, Edited by Nonika Marwaha (with inputs from PTI) | Updated: June 23, 2020 11:52 pm IST | Written by Sanjana Bhalerao | Mumbai | Published: June 24, 2020 4:13:40 am

Tillari is a forest located in the hilly ranges of Konkan-Western Ghats corridor:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Mumbai: The Maharashtra government on Tuesday declared almost 3,000 hectares of Tillari forest land as a conservation reserve for elephants who had wandered into Sindhudurg district from neighbouring Karnataka almost two decades ago. Tilari is a forest located in the hilly ranges of Konkan-Western Ghats corridor. It is located 492 km from Pune in Belgaun district of Karnataka, bordering the forests of Goa and Maharashtra.

A government notification said 2,953.38 hectares or 29.53 square-km area of Dodamarg forest range in Sindhudurg district would be a "reserved forest" for "conservation of tiger, elephant and leopard", or ‘Tillari Conservation Reserve’. The decision was taken in view of the area's ecological, fauna and floral significance, it stated. The area covering nine villages in the forest range is known to serve as a corridor and even as a habitat for the population of tigers and elephants moving between the three states of Goa, Karnataka and Maharashtra.

According to an official statement, Chief Minister Uddhav Thackeray has said that development in the state will not take place by ignoring wildlife and biodiversity. A committee will be set up for management of that area in Tillari, which will be the first conservation reserve in Sindhudurg district. Maharashtra's Tourism, Environment and Protocol Minister, Aaditya Thackeray tweeted thanking the chief minister for his "crucial push to this project".





Samadhan Chavan, Deputy Conservator of Forests of Sawantwadi in Sindhudurg, told PTI it was the first time that a forest has been reserved for elephants in the state. "This is a huge step as nowhere in Maharashtra a forest or any other area was reserved for elephants till now," Mr Chavan said. Maharashtra is home to 62 conservation reserves, of which 13 are in the Western Ghats. The reserve is also likely to generate employment for locals in the areas, the release stated.

The 38-km-long Dodamarg wildlife corridor that connects Radhanagari Wildlife Sanctuary in Maharashtra to Bhimgad Wildlife Sanctuary in Karnataka frequently witnesses elephant and tiger movement.

Tillari will be the seventh corridor in the state to be declared as a ‘conservation reserve’. Conservation reserve denotes protected areas which typically act as buffer zones to or connectors and migration corridors between established national parks, wildlife sanctuaries and reserved and protected forests. Such areas are designated as conservation areas if they are uninhabited and completely owned by the Government of India but used for subsistence by communities if part of the lands are privately owned.

Girish Punjabi, a wildlife biologist at Wildlife Conservation Trust (WCT) who is working in the Tillari region, said between 2014 and 2019, seven tigers have been identified in the region. “The land in Tillari which was under the forest department was a reserve forest which basically is less protected. Being declared as a conservation reserve is a step in the right direction and gives it some level of protection from development projects. Tillari area abuts the Mhadei (Goa) and Bhimgad (Karnataka) wildlife sanctuaries. The area is not only a corridor for tiger movement between these sanctuaries but also a habitat,” he said.

As I said there, Tillari is a forest located in the hilly ranges of Konkan-Western Ghats corridor. According to UNESCO, the Western Ghats are a chain of mountains running parallel to India’s western coast; approximately 30–50 km (18.64–31.07 miles) inland; traversing the States of Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Goa, Maharashtra and Gujarat; covering an area of around 140,000 km² (54,054.3 miles²) in a stretch 1,600 km (994.19 miles) long that is interrupted only by the Palghat Gap measuring 30 km (18.64 miles) at around 11°N; are older than the great Himalayan mountain chain; a geomorphic feature of immense global importance; are recognized as one of the world’s eight ‘hottest hotspots’ of biological diversity along with Sri Lanka; demonstrate speciation related to the breakup of the ancient landmass of Gondwanaland in the early Jurassic period, secondly to the formation of India into an isolated landmass and the thirdly to the Indian landmass being pushed together with Eurasia. A number of flagship mammals occur in the property, including parts of the single largest population of globally threatened ‘landscape’ species such as the Asian elephant, gaur and tiger. Endangered species such as the Lion-tailed macaque, Nilgiri tahr and Nilgiri langur are unique to the area: https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1342

The Western Ghats are also known as the 'Sahyadri' (Mountain of Patience), and the coastal region between them and the Arabian Sea is officially known as the 'Konkan', with other names including the olden 'Aparanta': https://books.google.com/books?id=1YILeU...&q&f=false

The highest point in these ghats is that of Anamudi (meaning "Elephant's head") in Anamudi Shola National Park (near other parks like that of Eravikulam), Kerala State, near the border with Tamil Nadu. Part of the Anaimalai or Anamala Hills (also known as the Elephant Mountains), it rises to an elevation of 2,695 m (8,841.86 ft), with a topographic prominence of 2,479 m (8,133.2 ft), making it the highest point in India south of the Himalayas, besides being the peak with the greatest topographic isolation within India, and is thus known as the "Everest of South India": https://www.keralatourism.org/munnar/ana...kerala.php, http://eravikulam.org/eco-tourism-programs/, http://www.peaklist.org/WWlists/ultras/south_india.html, https://dsal.uchicago.edu/reference/gaze...05_342.gif, https://peakbagger.com/list.aspx?lid=302, https://www.newindianexpress.com/opinion...33161.html

A view of the Anaimudi peak from the Naikolli Mala ridge, by M. D. Madhu (14th of February, 2014):
   

The peak of Naikolli Mala in Eravikulam National Park, with Neelakurinji flowers in bloom, by Matthieu Aubry (4th of September, 2006):
   

Doddabetta near the town of Ooty (officially known as Udagamandalam, also known as Ootacamund, and abbreviated as Udhagai) in Tamil Nadu, the highest point in the Nilgiri Hills at at 2,637 m (8,651.57 ft), by user "Naini2407" (21st of August, 2016): http://peaklist.org/WWlists/ultras/south_india.html
   

View from the road to Mullayana Giri (the highest peak in Karnataka State, located in the Chandra Dhrona Hills of Chikkamagaluru Taluka, with a height of 1,930 m or 6,332.02 feet) by Shveta J. S. (10th of August 2014): http://www.chickmagalur.nic.in/htmls/tou...in.htm#mul
   

Reportedly the 2nd highest plunge-waterfall in India, the Jog Falls on the Sharavati river located in Sagara Taluka, Shimoga District, Karnataka State, by user "Jughead i" (15th of August, 2006): http://www.jogfalls.in/about.html
   

Hills near Chorla Ghat on the border of the states of Karnataka, Goa and Maharashtra, about 50 km (30.07 miles) by road) and nearly 55 kilometres (34.18 miles) from Belgaum (in Karnataka, near Maharashtra), by user "Deepu9538" (12th of October, 2014): https://books.google.com/books?id=rVnvDw...at&f=false, https://books.google.com/books?id=4GfoDw...at&f=false
   

View from Varandha Pass, located on the road from Mahad to Bhor (which is about 74 km or 45.98 miles long), and reaching a height of around 800 m (2,624.67 ft), by C. J. Samson (15th of August, 2010):
   

Maharashtra's highest point, Kalsubai (1,646 m or 5,400.26 ft), located on the border of Igatpuri Taluka (Nashik District) to the north and the Akole Taluka (Ahmednagar District) to the south, by user "Hamehta3" (27th of December, 2006): http://travelplay.in/trek-kalsubai-everest-maharashtra/
   

The hill station of Saputara in the Dang District of southern Gujarat, near the border with Maharashtra, by user "Ritesh169O" (8th of September, 2012): https://dangs.gujarat.gov.in/tourist/sap...ll-station
   
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( This post was last modified: 12-30-2020, 12:12 PM by BorneanTiger )

The subrange of the Sarat Mountains (or Sarawat) to which Jabal An-Nabi Shu'ayb belongs, that is the Haraaz Mountains of Yemenhttps://books.google.com/books?id=eQvhZa...yb&f=false

Credit: Rod Waddington (20th of December, 2013):
   

A mountaintop village with crops, by Waddington (20th of August, 2013):
   

More terraces, by Waddington (19th of February, 2014):
   

The mountaintop town of Manakhah near Jabal An-Nabi Shu'ayb, by Waddington (21st of April, 2014):
   

Fortified settlements amidst the mountains, by Waddington (19th of August, 2013):
   

The road from Kahil to Manakhah, right over these mountains, by user "Yeowatzup" (27th of January, 2010):
   

A farm, by Waddington (21st of April, 2014):
   

Another view of a mountaintop village, by Waddington (20th of August, 2013):
   

The Yemeni Highlands, by Waddington (29th of January, 2014):
   

Water-reservoir, by Mufaddal Q. N. (30th of January, 2013):
   
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( This post was last modified: 01-10-2021, 09:50 PM by BorneanTiger )

Located about 75 miles (121 km) east of the capital San‘a’ (صَنْعَاء), the Yemeni city of Ma’rib (مَأْرِب) is not only the capital of the governorate of the same name, but it also used to be the capital of the ancient kingdom of Sheba (Ge'ez: ሳባ (Saba), Arabic: سَبَأ‎ (Sabaʾ), South Arabian: ??? (S-b-ʾ), Hebrew: שבא‎ (Šəḇā), treating Yemen as the location of the Biblical kingdom, rather than Ethiopia or Africa), which is mentioned in the Bible as well as the Qur’an (27: 15–44, 34: 15–17). It is known for its ancient dam, which was reportedly built in the 8th century B.C., and collapsed sometime before the birth of Muhammad in the 7th century CE: https://books.google.com/books?id=oMceAg...ib&f=false

Ruins of the Old Town of Ma’rib, by Bernard Gagnon (18th of August, 1986):
   

The ruins of multi-story mud-brick buildings can be seen on the top of a mound, or tell, formed from the accumulated man-made deposits of the central part of the ancient city. While the city has been inhabited since at least the first millennium B.C.E., the standing buildings are of relatively recent date, some still inhabited (circa 2006). The exposed stone walls in the foreground were part of an outlying area of the ancient city. The modern city of Ma’rib is located about 3.5 km (2.17 miles) to the north. Credit: Tapatio (27th of February, 2008)
   

The ancient dam set amidst the Sarat Mountains (or Sarawat), by Ljuba Brank (20th of August, 2012):
   

By Grobe (1988)
   

An artist's impression of the ancient dam, by the University of Calgary and the American Foundation for Anthropology (7th of February, 2017):
   

The Saba’eans had engaged in solar worship, before ceasing under the influence of the Israelite King Solomon (who was a Monotheist), during the reign of the legendary Queen, locally referred to as "Balqees" or "Bilqees" (بلقيس). Ruins of a temple, referred to as Ma‘bid Barraan (معبد برّان, Barran Temple), ‘Arsh Bilqees (عرش بلقيس, Throne of Bilqis) or Maḥram Bilqees (محرم بلقيس, Sanctuary of Bilqis), can be seen today:

View of the temple by Brank (20th of August, 2012):
   

Another view by Brank (27th of April, 2008):
   

It is worth noting that Ma’rib has a newer dam at the mouth of Wadi Adhanah (وادي أذنة), which was constructed in the 1980's at the expense of Shaikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the founding President of the U.A.E. who was reportedly descended from Saba’eans, who had migrated to places like what is now the U.A.E., after the collapse of the historical dam: https://books.google.com/books?id=tjXRfq...ib&f=false

Credit: Gagnon (18th of August, 1986) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Marib_dam.jpg
   
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More Sarat Mountains (Jibal as-Sarawat, جبال السّروات) in Saudi Arabia

Jabal Nis (جبل نيس) next to Wadi Rim (وادي ريم) in Al-Bahah Region; credit: Allosh77 (10th of August, 2013) 
   

Clouds next to the mountains of Al-Bahah Region; credit: مجووود العدواني (28th of August, 2014) 
   

qasbah (قصبة, watchtower) in the city of Al-Bahah (الباحة); credit: Fake God20 (12th of July, 2009) 
   

The city of Fayfa’ (فيفاء) in Jazan or Jizan Region; credit: Yahya711 (9th of April, 2013; 19:56:11) 
   

Credit: Faifa (22nd of July, 2009) 
   

Jebel Al-Qeher (جبل القهر) in Jazan Region; photo courtesy of the Saudi Commission on Tourism and National Heritage
   

Panoramic views of the villages and their oases from the summit of Jabal Raum (جبل روم) in Najran Province; credit: SPA
   
   

The Dam of Najran Valley (Sudd Wadi Najran, سدّ وادي نجران); credit: Retlaw Snellac Photography (1st of February, 2006) 
   
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( This post was last modified: 09-24-2021, 09:58 PM by BorneanTiger )

Hillocks, hills or mountains of Al-Hijaz (الحجاز), in and around the city of Makkah (مكّة): 

The hillock of As-Safa (الصّفا); credit: Imam Khairul-Annas (5th of September, 2013; 07:57:17) 
   

The hillock of Al-Marwah (المروة); credit: Aiman titi (24th of October, 2012; 18:33:12) 
   

Jabal Abu Qubays (جبل أبو قبيس, Mountain (or Hill) of the Father of Qubais), which is covered by buildings to the right; credit: Saudi Pics 
   

Jabal An-Nur (جبل النّور, Mountain of Light), by Wal N. (27th of December, 2007; 14:01) 
   

Ghar Hira’ (غار حراء, Cave of Hira’) by Nazli
   

Jabal Thawr (جبل ثور, Mount Bull); credit: Accor 
   

Ghar Thawr (غار ثور, Cave of Bull); credit: Voice of Islam 
   

Mina (منى); credit: Aiman titi (14th of November, 2011) 
   

A tilted unusual photograph of Muzdalifah (مزدلفة) when it is empty; credit: Q. N. Mufaddal (7th of April, 2011; 11:23 U.T.C.) 
   

Jabal Ar-Rahmah (جبل الرّحمة, Mount of the Mercy) in the Plain of `Arafat (عرفات); credit: علاء (27th of January, 2013; 21:38:27) 
   
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