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giant otter - Pteronura brasiliensis

Dark Jaguar Offline
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#16

(02-22-2021, 06:48 PM)Balam Wrote:
(02-22-2021, 03:29 PM)Styx38 Wrote: Caiman seem pretty easy to kill by various animals.

Might be because they are fish eaters, compared to the macropredatory lifestyle of Crocodiles and Alligators.

Still, the Otter killing this Crocodilian is quite an impressive feat.


*This image is copyright of its original author


http://alautreboutduboutdumonde.uniterre...e%29+.html

It's rather obvious why you're trying to make caiman seem weak crocodilians compared to other crocodilians. Turns out you're wrong here as well:

After python, it is an otter's turn to kill and eat an alligator
The photographs taken in 2011 show an otter killing and devouring an alligator at the Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge, Florida


*This image is copyright of its original author




The vast majority of crocodilians feast of fish, and that includes "macro predatory" (which all crocodilians are) like Nile or Saltwater crocodiles. The famous scenes of Nile crocodiles killing wildebeest and zebra only happen seasonally and are dependant on the ungulate migrations. Caiman from different species will eat whatever they can catch, this is the same case as all other crocodilians, and animals strong enough to kill them will do so if they can, which is the case for all other crocodilians as well.

Well said.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#17

I've already told this story before but I saw a Caiman swim right up to 3 Otters with a Kill and there was a big splash underwater and the Otters scattered while the Caiman fed on their fish kill. One of the Otters also had a nice wound on it as well. Also, you won't see Otters killing full grown Caiman, youngsters for sure but Big Caiman seem to be immune to Otters or at least they're not worth the Risk. 


A poster at Carnivora named Ghostoftsavo said this

"It seems Yacare Caimans and also the spectacled caiman are highly underrated here. Just because the Yacare caimans are not scared of humans does not mean they are timid. Yacare Caiman is one of my favorite species and they are a lot of fun to be around. I spent some time for work in the Pantanal and they are literally everywhere. Fishing becomes a very interesting sport there as you try to reel in your fish before the caimans get to it. I have some nice video footage of this. 

Btw unprovoked predatory attacks by Yacare caimans on humans do happen. There are a few cases where the person lost a limb. Also there is one case where the Yacare caiman jump in the boat and bit the back of a tourist. They are really not that small. Attached some pics of a few nice sized Yacare and Spectacled caiman. 

And man when these guys snap their jaws its like a gun shot. 

I attached a few of my pics."
One of his photos

*This image is copyright of its original author


here's what he mentioned about the work he does

"Initially I was going to get involved in with a Giant otter project in 2015 but that fell through. Then in 2017 I did get to go but it was for a eco-tourism project. Currently i"m working with a Peccary research project but haven't been able to go back due to Corona. The first time I was in the Pantanal was in 2004. It is honestly one of my top 3 favorite places in this world for wildlife. "
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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#18

credits: Morales-age fotostock/imagestate


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#19

photo: Nicole Duplaix

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Dark Jaguar Offline
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credits: Erisvaldo/Almeida


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Dark Jaguar Offline
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#21

photos: Bernard Dupont


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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#22

Giant otters sighting in Pantanal.




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Giant Otter Cub learn how to swim - Amazon.




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Dark Jaguar Offline
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#26

Pantanal - MT

credits: Martin Grace

*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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#27
( This post was last modified: 06-27-2021, 04:24 PM by Dark Jaguar )

onças do rio negro

''A family with 9 Giant Otters walking out of the water scares the Black-collared hawk !''

VIDEO
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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#28

Projeto Ariranhas ( Giant Otter Project )

''Its not always that Giant Otters are comfortable with our presence. This group, for example, is clearly fleeing from the boat. And this escape behavior can even drive a group away from its territory or cause other more severe consequences such as: affecting reproductive success, increasing the mortality of cubs and even increasing the aggressiveness of the Giant Otters leading to accidents. Therefore, whenever you notice escape behaviors like this stop the boat, back away slowly, avoid sudden movements and sounds which can further aggravate the animals' state of stress. If everyone who circulates in the area takes these same precautions, it is possible that the Otters will start to tolerate our presence better and even allow a longer time of contemplation.''


VIDEO
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#29
( This post was last modified: 01-22-2022, 04:54 PM by Dark Jaguar )

Projeto Ariranhas (Giant Otter Project)

How does a Giant Otter's Growl sounds like?

"What is that sound?" Have you ever heard the sound of a dog protecting its bone? Giant otters also growl to protect their food or to signal that they are not happy with the presence of an intruder in their comfort zone. This giant otter is growling at its partners in order to defend its delicious prey.''


VIDEO
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( This post was last modified: Yesterday, 03:01 AM by Dark Jaguar )

Projeto Ariranhas (Giant Otter Project)

''Hah'' sound of Giant Otters

"What is that sound?" It just sounds like an exhalation of air but it is the “Hah” sound, a short sound vocalized in situations of alert or inquiry. Otters usually emit Hah's when they are investigating something new in their territory or when they confront a predator, as in this video, in which the group was mobbing a jaguar. Hah's are usually emitted accompanied by snorts and growls, as in this situation.''

VIDEO
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