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Dragonflies interaction with other invertebrates

Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#16


*This image is copyright of its original author


Female Swamp Darner & Male Regal Darner

Female {Epiaeschna heros} begins to eat a still-living male {Coryphaeschna ingens} after he attempts to court her.







Taken Summer 2014 at Beckwith Camp & Conference Center



Cropped to exclude child's dirty foot.



Didn't have time to grab camera; only had my iPhone on me.



live.staticflickr.com/8753/16952766437_0341c515ab_b.jpg

Poor male Regal darner....
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#17
( This post was last modified: 01-22-2023, 02:09 PM by GreenGrolar )





Even dragonflies have their enemies. This dragonfly is either a swamp darner (probably female as males stay closer to the water except during mating season) or a female regal darner.

Code:
Habitat
Dragonflies and damselflies are found all over Australia and although they need water to breed, individuals can be seen flying many kilometres from freshwater. Males tend to be territorial staying close by water to guard their hunting and mating grounds. They can often be observed perched on a favourite vantage point, usually a branch or rock protruding from the water or flying rapidly across their territory. When guarding their territory they will often fly rapidly after intruders chasing them away before returning to the same perch.

Females often roam further from water in search of prey. The nymphs are predominantly aquatic, although one species in known to inhabit wet leaf litter in northern Queensland. The nymphs of dragonflies and damselflies can be found in many aquatic habitats including either sluggish or fast running freshwater creeks, rivers, stream and lakes, and some species inhabit the more saline habitats of inland waters.
https://www.ento.csiro.au/education/inse...onata.html
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#18


*This image is copyright of its original author

Great blue skimmer mating: male and female have different colours.





Looks like the great blue skimmer’s jaws can draw a bit of blood.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Red fired Cannibal fly feeding on Great blue skimmer.

www.pbase.com/image/133941495


*This image is copyright of its original author

Female great blue skimmer.
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#19




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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#20




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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#21




Dragonfly devours horsefly.
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#22




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