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Dinosaur news

Malaysia johnny rex Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-14-2019, 05:24 AM by johnny rex )

(01-13-2019, 07:31 AM)GuateGojira Wrote:
(01-12-2019, 09:58 PM)brotherbear Wrote: http://paleontologyworld.com/exploring-p...e-eclipsed  
   
The Giant Crocodile Dinosaur that Would Have Eclipsed the T. Rex

Interesting fossils and impresive creature. Thank you for the information.

What I don't like is the eternal comparison with the T. rex, I mean everityme that a new carnivore is discovered they compare it with the T. rex: bigger than the..., of the same size than the..., cousing of the...., etc. etc.

It is really silly that the news reports are very ignorant and lacks of knowledge of this matters and try to be very sensacionalists in this type news, very depresing.


Who's the admin of paleontologyworld anyway? He acted so childish with those "T-rex fanboys" words.
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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Paleontology discoveries 2018 recap





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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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These forest dinosaurs were they predators or insectivores ?

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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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Just posting this here for those who didn't see it in the other thread

Ibrahim's Spinosaurus is actually a GOOD thing for dejected Spinosaurus fans (as in, they can once again rule the T rex vs Spinosaurus debate). Why?
No matter how badly Spinosaurus may lose on land, it absolutely dominates in water, hands down. I'd in fact go so far as to say it's appropriate to state Spinosaurus as the overall winner because it has more of a chance of winning on land than T rex does in water.
Same goes for other terrestrial opponents, such as Carcharodontosaurus, Giganotosaurus, etc, or aquatic opponents such as the killer whale (except slightly different; it has a good chance in water already and absolutely dominates on land)
The only exception to this are amphibious crocodiles; they share the same lifestyle. But even against the biggest amphibious animals I would back Spinosaurus

TL;DR: Dejected Spinosaurus fans, fear not. Spinosaurus still wins overall.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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Do you know this movie about prehistoric animals, at first the dinosaurs ?

Horned dinosaurs are excellent, carnivore dinosaurs a little too emaciated, but it's only details. Humoristic,well done, good music too...

" Join Dinosaurs for incredible kid-friendly videos. Enter the prehistoric world when dinosaurs ruled the Earth. See them hunt and battle. See them roam in massive herds. Go back in time and experience what dinosaur life was like.  ".











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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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Valued dinosaurs' speed:

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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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Lythronax (meaning "King of gore") was a tyrannosaur that lived about 80 million years ago in North America. It is estimated to have measured 2.5 tons, besides being 8 feet tall and 24 feet long: https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/d...index.html

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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Dinosaurs marching, nothing news but not outdated... For example. the spinosaurus is in accordance with the most recent depiction.




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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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Do you know the famous series "Walking with dinosaurs" from the BBC ? Here you are the "Walking with dinosaurs" from the JWE (Jurassik World Evolution) series... The episods are a little bit shorter, other dinosaurs are highlighted, the music is the same but it's very interesting !




































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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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Sorry, but at the previous post I have inserted by mistake the last episod ("JWE Special"), with this one:





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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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At last, - I have been waiting it for a moment - the last one of the sery JWE ! With the T-rex and the final breakdown of the mesozoic era:






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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" Birds are dinosaurs, dinosaurs are closest related to crocodiles. Crocodiles are therefore closer related to birds than they are to lizards. Both crocodiles and lizards are reptiles. So why do people refrain from calling birds reptiles, after all birds are dinosaurs. (To eliminate confusion, synapsids are adjacent to reptiles but they themselves are not reptiles, so mammals are thus not reptiles either). "


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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-07-2020, 10:01 PM by BorneanTiger )

(04-17-2020, 12:33 PM)Spalea Wrote: " Birds are dinosaurs, dinosaurs are closest related to crocodiles. Crocodiles are therefore closer related to birds than they are to lizards. Both crocodiles and lizards are reptiles. So why do people refrain from calling birds reptiles, after all birds are dinosaurs. (To eliminate confusion, synapsids are adjacent to reptiles but they themselves are not reptiles, so mammals are thus not reptiles either). "


Modern-day birds like chickens and ostriches would be (distantly) related to theropods like T-rex, and theropods were physically intermediate between birds and modern-day reptiles, but what about sauropods like Brachiosaurus and Argentinosaurus? Whereas say crocodilians and theropods were carnivores with elongated, powerful jaws, sauropods were herbivores that looked more like giraffes and camels. Also see this thread: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-are-din...#pid120735

Skull of a saltwater crocodile (foreground) and gharial (background) in the Museum of Zoology, Saint Petersburg, Russia, by I. Marriomassone:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Sue the T-rex at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, the USA, by Scott Robert Anselmo:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Exhibit of a chicken's skeleton at the Education and Exhibition Centre, Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Gardens, by Daderot:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Skeleton of Brachiosaurus in Chicago by Roland Arhelger:

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" The 1.7 million acres of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument has history, literally, right at your feet. Within the boundaries of this national monument, fossil records of the earth and its inhabitants date back more than 70 million years. Through the fossils they have found, paleontologists have shown that this arid desert has at different times been an ocean, lake, and swamp. Fossil types include fish, turtles, sharks teeth, plant life and dinosaurs. Many of the dinosaurs were first discovered at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Several dinosaur tracks have also been found throughout the monument. Professional digs in the area completed as recently as 2001 have led to some of very exciting dinosaur finds. In fact, the paleontologists that have done work in the area say that Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument has the highest concentrations of dinosaur fossils found anywhere in the world. You can go fossil hunting and explore the history of the earth, but remember to leave what you find so that others may have the same exciting experience."


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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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Paulo Leite: " Happy Dinosaur Day! Can you name all of them? "


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