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Big Cat's Canines and Claws

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#46
( This post was last modified: 09-06-2015, 11:21 PM by GrizzlyClaws )

Bengal tigress


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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#47

African lion


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United States Pckts Offline
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#48

Golden from Noahs Ark

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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#49

A record sized Clouded leopard fangs, 9.3 cm and 9.1 cm, a modern sabertooth cat by all definition.


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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#50

Amur tiger and South China tiger


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United States tigerluver Offline
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#51
( This post was last modified: 09-09-2015, 05:59 AM by tigerluver )

Canine morphology in the larger Felidae: implications for feeding ecology (2007) by Per Christiansen is attached, it would belong nicely here.

Attached Files
.pdf   CHRISTIANSEN-2007-Biological_Journal_of_the_Linnean_Society.pdf (Size: 379.18 KB / Downloads: 30)
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#52
( This post was last modified: 09-09-2015, 11:15 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

Lion and tiger's crown comparison.

Tiger's canine has greater curvature on the crown such as a folding angle on the rear of the lateral side.


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United States Pckts Offline
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#53

Any hypothesis as to why the folding is more pronounced in the tiger canine than lion?
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#54

I think the most plausible hypothesis is that tiger being convergently evolved toward the sabertooth cats.

But still, tiger's canine teeth are robust conical, while the sabertooth cat's canine teeth are slender blade-like.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#55
( This post was last modified: 09-10-2015, 12:23 AM by Pckts )

I wonder if it has to do with making the kill as well.

I have noticed that Tigers tend to hold fast on their kills throat or spine while lions don't hold on as long since they have more mouth's to help with the kill. Maybe also since their large prey usually has back up so they are forced to release more often while tigers like to separate their large prey and make quick kills if possible.

So maybe the curved canine allows them to withstand the tug of war motion while maintaining their bite.

Just a guess
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#56
( This post was last modified: 09-10-2015, 02:33 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

Tiger's fangs are long enough to instantly crush the windpipe, and they are deeply rooted as well, unlikely the sabertooths fang which were designed purely for exsanguination.

I think the longer fangs with a slightly curved folding angle could prevent the fangs getting snapped during the struggle with the large prey when the fangs sink deeply into the throat.

The neck of those large bovids are really thick, and it can seriously snap the fangs if it got a violent struggle.
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#57

Are a lot of these teeth from "pharmacy fauna" (teeth used by traditional apothecaries)?
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#58
( This post was last modified: 09-10-2015, 01:10 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

Those subfossils from Manchuria are mostly belonged to the fauna that dated less than 10,000 years old. Those are used for the fossil collection.

While those old tiger fangs in China that dated about 50-100 years were used the traditional medicine purpose.

Recently, there are also many lion fangs appear among the private collections, some of these specimens are wild from the big game hunting, while some others from the captive specimens.
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#59
( This post was last modified: 09-10-2015, 12:59 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

(09-09-2015, 09:51 PM)Pckts Wrote: Any hypothesis as to why the folding is more pronounced in the tiger canine than lion?

Also, not all tiger fangs have that folding.

Virtually, some tiger fangs have the folding, some others don't have, but nearly all lion fangs don't have that folding.

Some captive Amur tigers also don't have that folding, and almost all wild Bengal tigers have that folding.

It seems that the northern Bengal fangs might have even exceeded the superiority of the Amur fangs.
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#60
( This post was last modified: 09-10-2015, 01:03 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

(09-10-2015, 12:35 AM)tigerluver Wrote: Are a lot of these teeth from "pharmacy fauna" (teeth used by traditional apothecaries)?

Most fangs I posted here are belong to the private collection.

They don't belong to the apothecary anymore. Otherwise, the fangs wouldn't look so intact.
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