There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Bears of the Pleistocene

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators

Spalea, I agree wholeheartedly. I know that it has been accepted now pretty much as fact that Smilodon lived and hunted as a pride. I have read it both ways considering atrox. If the American lion hunted in groups, then they too would have posed a huge threat to the grizzly. If they hunted as individuals like a leopard or a tiger, then probably they would stalk the occasional sub-adult and sometimes a mature she-bear. But, loners or group hunters, the bear would no doubt do his best to avoid them. 
I also agree with your ideas concerning the La Brea tar pits. Bear fossils are scarce in comparison with Smilodon and the wolves. Perhaps like the bears, atrox would sometimes observe and recognize the danger. There is no doubt that the stench of death from the pits would draw bears from many miles around. The grizzlies and black bears were late arrivals, but even the short-faced bears are low in numbers by comparison. It had to be tough for both atrox and the bears to see and smell so much meat and walk away, even when sensing the danger.
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
4 users Like brotherbear's post
Reply

Canada Wolverine Offline
Regular Member
***

(04-03-2018, 02:25 PM)brotherbear Wrote: Life is very much a financial challenge to me right now, but in time I plan to order this book by an author I respect. 
                                                                                               
*This image is copyright of its original author

The title sounds intriguing. Probably my next book from Amazon.
2 users Like Wolverine's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 04-07-2018, 08:43 AM by epaiva )

Book The Cave Bear Story - Bjorn Kurten

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 04-07-2018, 08:46 AM by epaiva )

Cave Bear
Credit to @bartonfishoff

*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators

1.34 meters is equal to

52.76 inches
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
1 user Likes brotherbear's post
Reply

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 04-07-2018, 08:32 PM by brotherbear )

Post 301 is converting the shoulder height to American showing that this massive cave bear had a shoulder height of 4 feet and nearly 5 inches. He likely weighed 1500+ pounds.
 
Unrelated to cave bear data: 
The panda bear has been proven to be closely related to the Andean bear, or to be more specific, the short-faced bear lineage. This brings such monsters as Indarctos and Agriotheruim into the lineage.
Also, in comparing the panda bear with the Andean bear for similarities, we might see attributes basic to this lineage. Both the panda bear and the Andean bear have extremely strong jaws. This is proven to be true in extinct short-faced bears. Panda bears and Andean bears prove to be more vocal the Ursus bears. Perhaps this too was a short-faced bear trait. Neither the panda bear nor the Andean bear hibernates. It is widely accepted that the extinct short-faced bears never hibernated.
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
3 users Like brotherbear's post
Reply

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 04-10-2018, 12:18 AM by brotherbear )

From brown bear to cave bear. Amazing evolution.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC45432/

Tracking the origins of the cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) by mitochondrial DNA sequencing.
C Hänni, V Laudet, D Stehelin, and P Taberlet

The different European populations of Ursus arctos, the brown bear, were recently studied for mitochondrial DNA polymorphism. Two clearly distinct lineages (eastern and western) were found, which may have diverged approximately 850,000 years ago. In this context, it was interesting to study the cave bear, Ursus spelaeus, a species which became extinct 20,000 years ago. In this study, we have amplified and sequenced a fragment of 139-bp in the mitochondrial DNA control region of a 40,000-year-old specimen of U. spelaeus. Phylogenetic reconstructions using this sequence and the European brown bear sequences already published suggest that U. spelaeus diverged from an early offshoot of U. arctos--i.e., approximately at the same time as the divergence of the two main lineages of U. arctos. This divergence probably took place at the earliest glaciation, likely due to geographic separation during the earlier Quaternary cold periods. This result is in agreement with the paleontological data available and suggests a good correspondence between molecular and morphological data.
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
1 user Likes brotherbear's post
Reply

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
Canine Expert
*****
Moderators

(04-10-2018, 12:17 AM)brotherbear Wrote: From brown bear to cave bear. Amazing evolution.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC45432/

Tracking the origins of the cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) by mitochondrial DNA sequencing.
C Hänni, V Laudet, D Stehelin, and P Taberlet

The different European populations of Ursus arctos, the brown bear, were recently studied for mitochondrial DNA polymorphism. Two clearly distinct lineages (eastern and western) were found, which may have diverged approximately 850,000 years ago. In this context, it was interesting to study the cave bear, Ursus spelaeus, a species which became extinct 20,000 years ago. In this study, we have amplified and sequenced a fragment of 139-bp in the mitochondrial DNA control region of a 40,000-year-old specimen of U. spelaeus. Phylogenetic reconstructions using this sequence and the European brown bear sequences already published suggest that U. spelaeus diverged from an early offshoot of U. arctos--i.e., approximately at the same time as the divergence of the two main lineages of U. arctos. This divergence probably took place at the earliest glaciation, likely due to geographic separation during the earlier Quaternary cold periods. This result is in agreement with the paleontological data available and suggests a good correspondence between molecular and morphological data.


It is probably due the admixture from the Cave bear within the population of the modern European Brown bear.
2 users Like GrizzlyClaws's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
****

@brotherbear :

About #302: Andean Bear, Giant Panda and the Short Faced Bear belong to the same lineage ? They also have a extremely strong jaws ? Intereseting because they share this special feature above their diet: 100% vegetarian as concerns the giant panda, omnivorous for the Andean bear, 100% meat-based for the short-faced bear.

Perhaps too as you say, the short-faced bear was a "vocal" bear ? But how would we be able to know, determine, that ?
3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
Canine Expert
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 04-10-2018, 06:33 PM by GrizzlyClaws )

(04-10-2018, 03:02 AM)Spalea Wrote: @brotherbear :

About #302: Andean Bear, Giant Panda and the Short Faced Bear belong to the same lineage ? They also have a extremely strong jaws ? Intereseting because they share this special feature above their diet: 100% vegetarian as concerns the giant panda, omnivorous for the Andean bear, 100% meat-based for the short-faced bear.

Perhaps too as you say, the short-faced bear was a "vocal" bear ? But how would we be able to know, determine, that ?

Maybe the Giant Panda belongs to the tribe of Ailuropodini of the subfamily Tremactinae, whereas the Andean bear and Short-Faced bear belong to the tribe of Tremactini of the same subfamily.

BTW, the lineage of Ailuropodini remained in the old world, whereas the lineage of Tremactini migrated to the new world.
3 users Like GrizzlyClaws's post
Reply

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
Canine Expert
*****
Moderators

Tremactinae - cat-like bears with shorter muzzle

Ursinae - dog-like bears with longer muzzle

These two major branches of the bear might have split in a brief period after the formation of Ursidae.
3 users Like GrizzlyClaws's post
Reply

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators


*This image is copyright of its original author
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
3 users Like brotherbear's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB