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Bear and Big Cat interactions in the wild

United States brotherbear Offline
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From Russia with Love. 
*This image is copyright of its original author
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Finland Shadow Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-12-2018, 06:32 PM by Shadow )

(12-12-2018, 04:59 PM)brotherbear Wrote: From Russia with Love. 
*This image is copyright of its original author
That is a big one, no doubt about it. I just wish, that someone would always be standing right next to the animal in these photos, or in front of an animal and practically leaning on animal, so that back is against it. It would give so much better possibility to estimate better. But big is big, it can´t be hidden like this photo show.
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Finland Shadow Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-12-2018, 07:08 PM by Shadow )

(11-22-2018, 12:42 PM)Olga.bohai Wrote: Hello to all wildlife lovers!

I have new interesting info for you. Yesterday I had a dinner with the scientists from Leopard Land National Park and asked them a question about tigers and bears. And I was very surprised that they agree with my assumption that tigers expelled brown bears. There is no official confirmation because for nowadays we have not much records about animals population in our territory, people came here only 100 years ago, the reserves were launched in the middle of XX century, they started to use camera traps in 2010s and nobody can tell us how many tigers and bears were here before. The main reason why there are more black bears than brown bears that black bears can climb trees and save theirselves from tigers who can’t climb the trees because of their weight. Brown bears can’t climb the trees on the same reason. Tigers kill a lot of brown bears cubs, that’s why their population is much less than in Kamchatka and other Russian regions. That’s what our scientists say. Hope this information will be interesting for you.
P.S. I am now with tourists in Amur Leopards watching tour, they are waiting in the hide in taiga for the leopard comes out for his bait. We’ve already got records on camera traps that he came thrice for one night, I will send it later on the forum when I come back home with good internet access.

I noticed that posting only now and that was really interesting information. Also explanation makes sense. That is one thing what has crossed in my thoughts, that could tigers have that kind of impact to bear behavior. Even though male bears can roam there safely, mother bears are in different situation especially with cubs. That for sure would explain at least partially, that less brown bears than before. Females and cubs going further from areas with high tiger density and leaving then adult males to roam in larger areas searching food, but naturally in mating times have to go where females are.

It would be interesting to hear a little bit more some day and are my thoughts even close to that, what these scientists are thinking :) I think, that it is a little bit different situation when comparing to wolves. Wolves are forced to go away as packs leaving behind next to nothing of them. Brown bears then again are in different situation when females and cubs are vulnerable to tiger attacks and then again males in that size, that not anymore able to climb... well, they are then already pretty much that big, that no need to climb, they don´t have anymore any reason to feel threatened. So it sounds like partial expelling.

Anyway what you told is very interesting and theory which has logic and sense.
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China Smilodon-Rex Offline
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(12-12-2018, 04:59 PM)brotherbear Wrote: From Russia with Love. 
*This image is copyright of its original author
Over 1200 pounds body-weight?
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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Tiger/sloth bear interaction in Ranthambore




Famous matkasur tiger, sloth bear interaction of Tadoba andhari reserve, different angle footage



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United States brotherbear Offline
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(12-13-2018, 07:03 PM)Smilodon-Rex Wrote:
(12-12-2018, 04:59 PM)brotherbear Wrote: From Russia with Love. 
*This image is copyright of its original author
Over 1200 pounds body-weight?

The only source i have seen is Imgur, thats it.

imgur.com/gallery/S22Uz
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Finland Shadow Offline
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Here is one video, where tiger and sloth bear have a confrontation. The one filming this doesn´t have too steady hand.... but still from this can be seen how situation developes. Maybe someone could give some hint if there is said something interesting on background by these people talking there. Video starts with loud music, but when situation starts, music goes off at 0:09.




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India Suhail Offline
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Tiger gets chased by mother bear in ranthambore



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Finland Shadow Offline
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(12-22-2018, 05:52 PM)Suhail Wrote: Tiger gets chased by mother bear in ranthambore




Sloth bears have funny coughing sounds there in the end :) Obviously they had a lot to say to each others Grin
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United States brotherbear Offline
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When tigers hunt bears, I feel sure that the tiger separates black bears from brown bears, knowing their different habits. But I doubt that the sex or age of the bear has any bearing on the big cat's choice of potential prey. Size matters. This goes for all bears, black or brown. Although a tiger does not put a bear onto a set of scales, he seems to have a picture in his mind of the size limit of which bears to stalk and which ones to avoid. This, I suppose, comes from perhaps a million years of hunting bears. Instinct. That size limit seems to be roughly 400 to 450 pounds (  roughly 193 kg ). This size range includes juvenile and adult she-bears. The famous tiger named Dale ( among other given names ) including "the bear killer" was known to have a preference for bear meat. Of all the many bears Dale killed, only two were adult she-bears. It appears that bears within the 200 and 300 pound range are the most sought after prey bears. 
I believe that, should tigers come into contact with Himalayan bears which are much smaller than the grizzlies of the Russian taiga, even full-grown boar brown bears will be viewed as potential prey. In my opinion, it is not the sex of the bear that matters to the tiger, but the size.
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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United States brotherbear Offline
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I have come to the conclusion that tales told about animals by pioneers, animal trainers, hunters and explorers, and newspaper reporters from the early nineteenth century and into the mid-twentieth century must be taken with a grain of salt. I can only suppose that before television and movies, people enjoyed telling and listening to "whoppers". Then, for some time, the habit stuck. When we read about historical animal fights, they may or may not have happened at all. Even of those that did, many are half from fact and half from imagination to create a colorful story. What are we suppose to believe?
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Finland Shadow Offline
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(01-12-2019, 02:46 PM)brotherbear Wrote: I have come to the conclusion that tales told about animals by pioneers, animal trainers, hunters and explorers, and newspaper reporters from the early nineteenth century and into the mid-twentieth century must be taken with a grain of salt. I can only suppose that before television and movies, people enjoyed telling and listening to "whoppers". Then, for some time, the habit stuck. When we read about historical animal fights, they may or may not have happened at all. Even of those that did, many are half from fact and half from imagination to create a colorful story. What are we suppose to believe?

That is a good question... more there is contradiction to modern day, the more skeptic I am. For sure back then some species like Siberian tigers were bigger than nowadays can be seen. Before people started "massacres" of some species by totally irresponsible hunting and taking so much space to live from animals, there was so much more prey animals etc. 

But hunter stories in times, when most people had no chance to really know... much easier even write books and put there exaggerations. Not too many people at least could even imagine for instance internet even 30-50 years ago :) Not to mention situation before ww2.... and earlier. Golden ages for storytellers to put some extra there :)
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